Geography 200
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Changing How We Think About Africa

Do you speak African? Well, neither do the 1 billion people on the continent.Africa is home to 54 different nations, more than 2,000 languages and four of the world's 10 fastest growing economies, but is often painted with a sweeping stroke of doom and gloom. In this week's Reality Check, Mehdi Hasan exposes popular misconceptions about the African continent.
Taylor Doonan's insight:
This video combats many misunderstandings about Africa, the biggest one being that many people view Africa as one nation instead of 54 unique nations. It also talks about how some African countries are on the rise and that women have a large role in many governments in Africa. The video aims to take away the stigma of war and poverty that goes along with Africa. 
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ThePlanetaryArchives/BlackHorseMedia - San Francisco's curator insight, March 11, 2016 6:23 PM

This short video is full of with examples and statistics that show that many of the 'doom and gloom' perspectives and ways of thinking about Africa are outdated (at best).  Here are some good facts to update how we talk about Africa. 

 

Tags: Africa, perspective.

Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, March 21, 2016 3:07 PM

This short video is full of with examples and statistics that show that many of the 'doom and gloom' perspectives and ways of thinking about Africa are outdated (at best).  Here are some good facts to update how we talk about Africa. 

 

Tags: Africa, perspective.

David Stiger's curator insight, November 10, 2018 4:43 PM
This video mentions that the Western world's negative, doom and gloom perception of Africa are "lazy" and this is important. Westerners may have become so accustomed to the colonial and post-colonial problems in Africa, that there is an outside attitude of "what good could possibly come from Africa - they are doomed and deserve our pity and charity." In reality, as this video points out, Africa is not just one single entity and its different players are on the rise. It is a continent of 54 separate countries containing 1 billion people who speak from a range of 2,000 languages. The video mentions that nearly one third of Africa is part of the middle class. With that said, in our geographic mental maps, it is time to start looking at Africa like the 'Tiger Countries of Asia', like South Korea, who blossomed into economic powerhouses. This is a fair comparison as Africa now has the ten fastest growing economies in the world, outpacing the West. With this line of thinking, Africa is a continent full of opportunity containing a lot of promising potential if given the chance. Interestingly, if white-Americans and white-Europeans improved their attitudes about the 54 countries of Africa (and saw them as capable societies) this would humanize non-white people in general and probably reduce racist, bigoted attitudes. 
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Why Is Greenland an Island but Australia a Continent?

Why Is Greenland an Island but Australia a Continent? | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"Why is Australia a continent and Greenland is not? Even though Australia is the smallest of the accepted continents, Australia is still more than 3.5 times larger than Greenland. There has to be a line in the sand between small continent and the world's largest island and traditionally that line exists between Australia and Greenland. Geologically, Australia lies on its own major tectonic plate while Greenland is part of the North American plate."

Taylor Doonan's insight:
Australia is 3.5 times larger than Greenland and this article talks about how there is no internationally recognized definition of a continent. Though there is no internationally recognized definition the line between island and continent lies somewhere between Greenland and Australia. It is also worth noting that Australia sits on its own tectonic plate where Greenland is part of the North American plate. 
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 9, 2017 11:58 AM
unit 1
Anne Tumak's curator insight, March 10, 2017 4:28 AM

I'm sharing this link for two reasons. 

  1. To help resolve the confusion as to why Greenland the world's largest island but Australia gets to be the smallest continent. The main reason is all about the continental shelf and not the coastline--Greenland is connected to North America to the continental shelf while Australia has its own shelf. 
  2. I know many of you have been fans of Matt Rosenberg's online resources over the years.  If you have lost track of him, he is continuing to share geographic information on ThoughtCo

 

Tags: GreenlandAustralia, geology.

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Climate Comparison Maps

Climate Comparison Maps | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"Triton1982 makes maps by comparing each of the city's highest and lowest average temperatures against the Koppen classification system."

Taylor Doonan's insight:
This images shows how diverse Australia really is, they have climates similar to different cities all over the world. The southern coasts are similar to California, but the interior of the country is a desert, for such a small continent it has some of the most varying climates. 
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Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 2018 10:23 PM
This is an interesting map that compares Australia's climate to that of other regions. By doing this, the artist clearly explains how vast Australia's climate truly is. Because of its size, it is possible to think that Australia would not have such a diverse climate. However, its regions are comparable to deserts, the tropics, and temperate zones.
Matt Danielson's curator insight, December 12, 2018 4:30 PM
I found this very interesting. I always imagined Australia as a temperate cost with a vast dessert/prairie interior that was generally inhospitable. Though the interior part is true I learned that the coastal areas vary greatly in climate. This allows for a much more varied ecosystem in Australia than I ever imagined. 
Corey Rogers's curator insight, December 15, 2018 8:39 PM
This map makes it easier to understand the climate that is inside Australia. It is cool how every part of the country has its own unique climate. It also shows just how big Australia is and how crazy their climate can be. 
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How religion(s) spread across the world

How religion(s) spread across the world | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
VIDEO: 5,000 years of religious history in two minutes.
Taylor Doonan's insight:
The five major religions all growing throughout the world, rather quickly, with the exception of Judaism. Hinduism spread when it was established but quickly stopped spreading and does not span much of the world. Buddhism followed a similar path of Hinduism spreading but not going much beyond the continent of Asia, Buddhism is the largest religion in Asia and is also seen as a lifestyle and not just a religion. 
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Clayton Nelson's comment, April 4, 2016 10:09 AM
It is amazing to see how quickly some religions spread compared to others especially once the Islamic religion began. Also i believe its a great thing that during the age of discovery, religions were taken over to the new world with those who traveled there.
Alexis Michelle's curator insight, April 4, 2016 10:11 AM

Short, sweet and to the point--this video is a great way to show the historical geographies of major world religions. Each of these religions have been "born" somewhere and have grown to different countries. Everyone has a religion well most of everyone and I believe it is very important to know the history of the religion that you are or fit into.


Tags: religion, diffusion, culture, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism,
unit 3 culture.


Blake Bass's curator insight, April 7, 2017 10:05 AM
This article is very excellent at explaining where religions are and why they are there,this article relates to human geography and what we are learning because it explains the most practiced religions and where they are.
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Urbanization in China

China's citizens are moving from the countryside into cities in record numbers, boosting the economy but making party leaders uneasy


Tags: economic, planning, urban, China, East Asia.

Taylor Doonan's insight:
This video talks about how the dispersion of the population of China is changing, and becoming more urban. Many young rural citizens are choosing to go to the cities and find work there instead of staying and working on farms, but this poses the problem of who is tending to the crops in the rural areas, and because the young population is leaving it is often older members of the families. These younger citizens still often have land in the rural areas and many will return as they get older and continue to work on the fields, the country wants to find a way to keep these younger citizens in the urban areas as to continue to urbanize the country. 
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Nicholas Vargas's curator insight, July 16, 2015 11:30 AM

China is urbanizing rapidly, but at what cost?

 

How is this impacting China's citizens, specifically those that have been relocated?

François Arnal's curator insight, July 17, 2015 4:15 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

 

@Céline

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, July 18, 2015 9:02 AM

Une courte vidéo de la revue The Economist

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Why China is building islands in the South China Sea

"China is building islands in the South China sea and its causing disputes among the other nations in the region; Malaysia, the Philippines, Brunei, Vietnam, and Indonesia. China claims they aren't military bases, but their actions say otherwise. The US has many allies in the region and uses its massive Navy to patrol international waters, keeping shipping lanes open for trade."

Taylor Doonan's insight:
China is attempting to extend their EEZ by building islands in the South China Sea so they can claim the area 200 miles off the coasts of these man made islands. This is a problem because of the other countries that have EEZ claims in the South China Sea because if China claims more land it takes away the EEZ zones of some of these other countries. 
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Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 11, 2018 1:33 PM
China is being very sneaky in their attempt to control the South China Sea and have decided they don’t want to listen to any international laws or court rulings that don’t follow what they want.  In order to strengthen their claims to the South China Sea and increase their land holdings, the Chinese have decided to literally build islands in the body of water.  These islands are then used as naval bases to help them take over other islands that are held by other countries in the South China Sea.  Their strategy for taking over these islands is called the “Cabbage strategy” where they quietly surround and blockade the islands from the countries who hold control over them in order to take them over.  As much as the other countries bordering the South China Sea do not like what China is doing, they are unable to challenge them too much because China’s navy is the most powerful in the region.  This is a situation that shouldn’t be so escalated because international maritime laws have established that countries can control the water 200 miles off their coasts, which would mean China would control part of the sea, other East Asian countries would control part of the sea, and the center of the sea would be international waters.  However, the natural resources in the sea are irresistible to China, so they have started literally building islands and taking over tiny islands that would normally have no one on them.  Other countries in the South China Sea have responded by building and settling on these ridiculously small islands as well.  China has now taken their claims a step farther and claimed airspace above the South China Sea.  The recent breakthroughs in technology have changed the way that governments can claim their borders and made geography more complicated.  The reason that China has been getting away with this is that no country except the U.S. can keep China in check.  However, it would be impossible to threaten China with the American Navy without causing a much bigger military conflict.  So for now, China quietly continues taking over the South China Sea.
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 21, 2018 10:23 AM
The vast resources in the South China Sea and the benefits of the Exclusive Economic Zone make it clear why china wants and currently is building islands in the South China Sea. By occupying these newly created islands and claiming them for their own, they can extend their area of economic control by 200 nautical miles. For a nation that is rapidly industrializing and is heavily dependent on fossil fuels, these new areas of control are monumentally important.
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India-Pakistan border Ceremony

Fascinating footage of a traditional ceremony that takes place on the Pakistan India border. From the BBC
Taylor Doonan's insight:
This video shows a ceremony that takes place on the India-Pakistan border and how precisely things need to be done to keep the peace. The two flags are lowered at a slow pace to ensure they are being lowered at the same pace, for if one were to be lowered before the other it could cause an international dispute. 
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Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:32 PM

whether or not this incites nationalism in a poor way, i think it is a good thing. no nationalism is a very detrimental thing to a country, i believe that this does benefit both countries in a way, maybe not as far as relations between the two countries but internally having love for your own country.

Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 1, 2018 8:20 PM
This is a really interesting display of hyper-nationalism and masculinity that has been taking place at the India-Pakistan border for years. On the surface, it seems like simply an entertaining, friendly competition. However, many are concerned that this tradition does nothing but enforce the tension between the two countries.
Matt Danielson's curator insight, December 12, 2018 3:24 PM
This event is interesting. Its almost reminds of me of two football teams staring each other down and chanting before a football game.  There is alot of tension between the two countries and some thing there is always a lingering possibility of war. This can seem to some as a way to be macho and "battle" without actually going to war. 
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Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."

Taylor Doonan's insight:
This video addresses the problems with having a girl versus having a boy baby. It talks about families killing babies if they are girls, aborting them, all so they can go on to have a son. According to the video 200 million girls are missing throughout the world. Many of these missing girls are daughters that were aborted or killed so their families could go onto have a son. 
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:10 PM

Females might be the underdogs of men forever. Hopefully this is not the case but it just seems like it will be sometimes, doesn't it? Women have had issues with rights and equality from the beginning of time. Things need to change on a global scale for horrible situations like this to stop occurring so frequently.

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:52 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Processes and Patterns

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:45 PM

This femicide is extremely disappointing.  Genocide is expected in third world, war torn countries.  The fact that it's 2014 and female babies are murdered for being girls, and parents are scared for their  children's lives, show how much power the government has over the people's lives. It is sad to think the government has the power to dictate how many children families can have and what gender.  On the flip side, these are countries that are extremely overpopulated.  The one child policy in China is what China is currently using (along with this femicide) as population control.  This is an important issue because there needs to be some sort of population control, but to what extent? This is taking away someone's basic human right - to procreate. Parents do not have control over what gender they produce and if they produce a female, their child may be taken and murdered from them. The state takes away what you created, your offspring and there is nothing they can do about it. 

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Could ACFTA free trade deal be a new dawn for Africa? - BBC News

As African heads of state sign the first continent wide free trade deal, what will it mean for the people that live there? The BBC's Nancy Kacungir
Taylor Doonan's insight:
This video talks about free trade among African countries. African Continental Free Trade Agreement is Africa's attempt at getting countries to trade more with each other instead of going through other countries outside of Africa. Many of the countries in Africa have now signed this deal, and hopefully it will begin to boost many African countries economies. 
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Tanzania's Albinos Face Constant Threat Of Attack

For many albinos — born with a partial or total lack of pigment in their skin, hair and eyes — life is difficult, and that is particularly true in Tanzania, where they are attacked for their flesh, the result of superstitious beliefs.


Taylor Doonan's insight:
This article focuses on Albinos in Tanzania and their persecution. Albinos in Tanzania and much of Africa face people not  understanding them. Albino people face severe sensitivity to the sun and often have impaired vision and in Tanzania this is not commonly known and often misunderstood causing Albinos to fall behind in school or be made fun of for covering up their skin. My sister is albino and she has never faced any sort of persecution, she is accommodated for her vision at school and no one really even notices other than the occasional comments on how pretty her blonde hair is, hopefully Tanzania can get to that point some day where Albinos are treated like humans. 
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The Daily Show–Spot the Africa

Between rampant racial inequality and Ebola outbreaks, South African comedian Trevor Noah admits he hesitated to visit a country as underdeveloped as America.
Taylor Doonan's insight:
This video takes a South African and an American and they address misconceptions about Africa by playing a game where the American is shown two images and is to guess which one is in Africa and which is in America, of the images shown the worse looking ones were generally in America. They are not trying to say necessarily that America is worse off than parts of Africa, but that parts of Africa are doing well, and that they are not as bad as we may think. 
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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:15 PM
As comical as this is, it goes to show the kind of racism and pride we have in our country. Here the guest speaker says he took multiple photos of different places and wanted the host to figure out if it is America or Africa. Most of the photos showed undeveloped or terrible sections of the US and opposite for Africa. Each time the pictures were shown, the host assumed it was Developed America and underdeveloped Africa.
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 3:44 PM
This clip is a whimsical but also a way for Americans to understand there labeling of people is actually very incorrect, rude, and offensive. Most of America juts makes assumption based on what Hollywood puts out , for movies and commercials that this place is all desert and needs vast amounts of help. That however is far from the truth. Yes, they have the Sahara desert but that only makes up half of Africa. The bottom half of Africa is prosperous and we as Americans need to not believe everything we see.
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 12:06 PM
This is such an amazing skit between Trevor Noah and Jon Stewart. It is so informative in how ignorant average U.S. American's can be. Jon Stewart is portraying many people in the U.S. are genuine in their ignorance. With the pictures of scenes from different countries in Africa and in the U.S., you see that these so-called "developing countries" do have some very good things that are happening and the "greatest country" also has issues. It is just one of those things where you don't notice how much better life is getting in the world today.
 
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Egypt expels British journalist Bel Trew: Times of London | Egypt News | Al Jazeera

Egypt expels British journalist Bel Trew: Times of London | Egypt News | Al Jazeera | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Authorities threatened Times of London journalist, Bel Trew, with a military trial before deporting her, newspaper says.
Taylor Doonan's insight:
This article talks about a English journalist who was arrested, detained and then sent back to England with virtually no explanation. The woman had been living in Cairo for seven years and reporting for the London Times for five. The arrest came after interviewing a relative of a man who died on a boat on his way to Europe. The article also talks about how this is not uncommon due to the censorship of the government. This reporter and England will continue to look for a reason for her deportation. 
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Saudi Arabia unveils plans for 'entertainment city' near Riyadh

Saudi Arabia unveils plans for 'entertainment city' near Riyadh | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"The 334 sq km (129 sq mile) attraction - about the same as Las Vegas - will offer cultural, sporting and entertainment activities - including a Six Flags park and a safari park. The announcement boasts it will be the first of its kind in the world. Building will begin early next year and the first stage finished by 2022.

It forms part of a wider master plan. Vision 2030, announced by Deputy Crown Prince Mohammad Bin Salman a year ago, aims to diversify the economy and reduce the kingdom's reliance on oil, through a series of projects." 

Taylor Doonan's insight:
There are plans to build a giant entertainment city in Saudi Arabia, similar to Las Vegas. The question about building such a city in this region is the way women are treated in this region. Women must be covered at all times and cannot really go outside without a man, this would cause for an interesting dynamic in a city like this. It will be interesting to watch as it happens. 
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James Piccolino's curator insight, March 24, 2018 10:09 AM
I don't know if this is just me judging a culture without knowledge, but when I think Saudi Arabia, I do not think of entertainment, joy, and fun as the article puts it. This is more evidence of cultural outlooks than it is anything against the region. This city could also prove to be a turning point in their culture, and a larger embrace of westernization.
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Israeli settlements, explained

"Both sides claim the West Bank as legitimately belonging to them. Over time, and especially as Israeli politics has shifted rightward, the settler movement has become an institutionalized part of Israeli society. Support comes in the form of building permits, public investment, and even incentives for Israelis to move into the West Bank. While peace talks remain frozen, the settlements continue to grow, making any possibility of a Palestinian state in the West Bank faint."

Taylor Doonan's insight:
This video gives some in depth background on how Israel and Palestine are severely intermingled. It goes into the history of the creation of Israel and it talks extensively about the West Bank region and who lives there and who controls what parts. The region is very intertwined and more Israelis are moving into the region and how it would become more and more difficult to separate the region into two states. 
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Douglas Vance's curator insight, March 22, 2018 12:14 PM
These Israeli settlements not only violate UN resolutions, they also serve to undermine any viable two state solution. The level to which these settlements have divided Palestinian towns and cities have made creating a clearly defined border between the West Bank and Israel nearly impossible. In a way, Israel is actively undermining any attempts at such a solution by making the presence of their citizens so pervasive in Palestinian lands that it would become impossible to create a coherent border without having to first remove these settlers. 
David G Tibbs's curator insight, March 22, 2018 1:25 PM
The settlements started out has a religious spreading. However, that has dramatically changed over time due to economic reasons. Not only that the amount of government support for the people living in these lands are incredible, even in an outpost that is deemed illegal. The country occasionally goes into illegal areas and tear down houses to show a tough face on them. The government and its people theorized that more will come home and that the populations in the settlements will grow to half a million. The international community and Israeli must come up with a strategy before it gets to the point of no turning back. 
 
brielle blais's curator insight, April 1, 2018 4:34 PM
This shows how important clear and distinct boarders are for different countries. In this case, that is important because Palstine feels their land is justing getting taken, while Israel argues they are returning to their homeland. Either way, the rest of the world believes what Israel is doing is illegal and Palestine should have it's own autonomy as a state, in a two-state system.
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Papua New Guinea

"Papua New Guinea gained independence from Australia in 1975 and has over 800 languages;  87% of the population lives in rural areas." 


Tags: Papua New Guinea, Oceania.

Taylor Doonan's insight:
Papua New Guinea is a very unique country, it has an extremely diverse population and speaks more languages than any other country in the world. There are over 800 languages spoken in Papua New Guinea. This country is very interesting, they became independent from Australia in 1975 and have been slow to urbanize. Many of the countries villages are so un-urbanized that they can only be reached on foot, and many of the hundreds of languages that are spoken are only spoken on one of the villages that does not connect with another village. The country also struggles with clean drinking water and bathroom facilities. There is malnutrition across the country, but despite the difficulties the country faces they are improving their education and becoming a better country. 
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Chris Costa's curator insight, December 1, 2015 4:20 PM

I found this video to be very interesting, providing a brief overview of contemporary Papua New Guinea and the struggles the nation faces as we push deeper into the 21st century. Once a colonial possession of Australia, the nation gained its independence in 1975, although it retains close relations with its former colonizer; Australia is the nation's greatest provider of foreign aid. Although great strides have been made in areas such as education, health, and infrastructure, the nation lags far behind the West in terms of industrial development; just 58% of Guineans are literate, with a meager 3% of reads being paved, and the average Guinean having a lifespan some 20 years shorter than their Australian contemporaries. Although this may seem backwards to many Westerners, Guineans are proud of a rich, vibrant culture, with some 800 languages being spoken on the island. With each language representing a different culture, it becomes apparent how diverse the population really is, achieving a level of cultural complexity that has oftentimes been discouraged in today's Western world. We would do well to embrace the differences that are celebrated today in Papua New Guinea. While it is hoped that improved education will ultimately lead to a higher standard of living for all the people of Papua New Guinea, this writer hopes they don't lose track of the differences that make them so wondrous in a world that is oftentimes so intolerant of others.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 7, 2015 2:49 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon's page, some of the stats are mind boggling and they are actually portrayed as being good. For example, while 87% of the population is rural, 58% are literate. I figured the literacy numbers would be rather poor in a country where the entire population lives in rural areas, but I didn't think that 58% literacy would be something worth bragging about. Maybe except in North Korea.

Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 2018 10:37 PM
This video let’s us see into the world of Papua New Guinea. Even though it is Australia’s neighbor, the video focuses on the poverty and inequality that plagued the nation. PNG has extremely low life expectancies, birth and literacy rates. The country has over 800 languages and cultures that are all significantly different. Nearly half of the girls have not been educated, and some people experience extreme poverty without access to clean water and plumbing.
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Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic

Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Jakarta's traffic is legendary and locals have now become experts at finding ways to get around the jams, with some even making money out of them.

 

The population of Indonesia is heavily concentrated on the island of Java, and the capital city of Jakarta faces a tremendous strain on it's transportation network.  This video show that resourceful people will find inventive ways to make an unworkable situation manageable. 

Taylor Doonan's insight:
Jakarta makes rush hour in America look like a walk in the park, it is almost constantly busy and there are strict rules about who can be on the roads, such as there must be a certain number of passengers in a car and taxis are monitored. These rules cause residents to go to extreme measures, people often stand and get paid to be passengers in peoples cars so they meet the passenger requirement and that is how some of the residents of Jakarta afford to live. There are also many unregistered taxis that take the risk because registering them is difficult to do. 
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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 9:38 PM

The traffic in Jakarta is insane, to be in a constant standstill on your way to work is unreal. The reporter in the video says that if the city of Jakarta continues on its current path, it could be "in a state of Paralysis" which for an entire city is not good. The traffic has, for some, become a way to make money, illegally but money nonetheless.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:01 PM

Humans instinctively look to profit when the situation arises, this is one of those situations. The government implemented regulations that barely seem to manage the traffic jams, i.e. having 3 people per car. Since people do have to work and may not always be able to meet the requirements, others have started making a living as a “jockey,” an individual who offers to ride in a car so the 3 people limit is met. Doing this is considered illegal. Yet, there aren’t good enough jobs for people to work (otherwise they won’t be a jockey) and those who do work can’t seem to always follow the rule without it harming there work life.  Plus, more police now turn their attention towards these people thereby deterring them away from their other duties. I realize that the state probably never intended these consequences to happen, but now that it is I really wonder just how useful this law really is. One thing is certain though, without better planning or economic innovation by the government, the jams will continue to happen.

 

I find it odd that the people keep staying despite the major traffic problem. As one interviewee mentioned. I guess as long as you can find ways to stay productive and still receive enough compensation, the time spend in traffic isn't enough of a hassle for them. As someone who has enough economic opportunity with far less wait time in traffic though, I would find this situation unbearable. Clearly, this isn't that case though. So, I am not sure of the immediate solution. As we learned in class, the government tried transmigration. This just lead to more problems. It was then suggested that the type of opportunity. If that is the case though, what should the government do now? Waiting for a more natural economic opportunity to get the people out of Jakarta won't happen quick enough to curb the increasing population growth. Therefore the strain on the infrastructure will continue because the population's carrying capacity is exceeded. Whatever the answers, I think this would be a great case study for urban planning and the impact raising car dependency has on a society as this driving nightmare shows just how important planning is with more cars. 

Matt Chapman's curator insight, April 26, 2018 12:42 PM
Traffic is a show of heavy urbanization.  This shows just how urbanized Jakarta is and how many people are working and moving around the city.
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Maeklong Railway Market

"Multi-purpose land use."

Taylor Doonan's insight:
Urban planning in a rapidly urbanizing area can be difficult, but in this area two very different urban entities use the land together so beautifully. This market was built around the train tracks and when the train passes through at a slow speed the market clears the tracks and both work together so flawlessly. This is uncommon for us to see because many cities in America had room to grow and expand and had ample planning time because urbanization happened much slower than it is in Asia, with urbanization happening so fast the countries need to use their space flexibly. 
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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 7, 2015 2:59 PM

This is insanity!! I've never seen anything like this! I always wondered why people who live in such squalor stay living in the area. If you have to pack your house up so a train to come through it might be time to move.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:15 PM
Definitely a good way for multi-purpose land use. They are utilizing the space they have conservatively, they really nailed this one on the head coming up with an idea to put a market right on a railroad track. Is this concept even safe or sanitary? Most definitely not. First off, it is not sanitary because that train on a daily basis has gone through all sorts of dirt and the train is literally passing right over the farmer's food that he is still going to sell to customers. Also, probably not the safest, because the people are just inches away from the passing train and with the wrong move, they can possibly fall onto the track and they are dead. I will hand it to them though, they act in an orderly fashion and move swiftly both when it comes and when it leaves. As a matter of fact, they go on with life so well after it leaves, it is almost like the train never passed through in the first place.
Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 2, 2018 2:57 AM
In one video we see issues surrounding urban development, city planning (or lack thereof), population density, and land use, among other topics. As more and more people move into Southeast Asia's unplanned cities, there will be more crowding and people will have to use every last available inch of land, even if that means going right up to the train tracks. This is a culture shock to people in the West, where most land is single-use only.
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Why China and India face a marriage crisis

"What has lead to this marriage squeeze?  First, millions women have gone 'missing'. A generation ago, a preference for sons and the greater availability of prenatal screening meant first Chinese couples, then Indian ones, started aborting female fetuses and only giving birth to boys. At its extreme, in parts of Asia, more than 120 boys were being born for every 100 girls. Now, the generation with distorted sex ratios at birth is reaching marriageable age. The result is that single men far outnumber women."

 

Tags: gender, China, India, culture, population.

Taylor Doonan's insight:
This video talks about the marriage crisis India and China will be facing over the next few decades. The one child rule that was enforced in the region caused many couples to selectively abort their daughters so they could have sons instead, doing this caused a major population gap between men and women. Now as this group of the population where men so drastically outnumber women come of age the countries face a marriage crisis. With men so drastically outnumbering women and marriage being such an important part of the culture in India and China the countries could undergo severe cultural changes. 
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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, September 17, 2016 7:23 PM
Great food for thought!
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Gapminder Tools

Gapminder Tools | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Animated global statistics that everyone can understand
Taylor Doonan's insight:
This info-graphic tool is interesting and shows a multitude of different things when looking at populations. When looking at birth rate per woman in India versus America it shows a great span of time when birth rates drop in America, this drop happened in India over a much faster span of time and this tool can be used to look at trends of what could happen in much of the developing world. 
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Rise of solar panel energy in Bangladesh

Taylor Doonan's insight:
A small village in Bangladesh is not generally what comes to mind when you think of solar energy, but this small village is using solar energy to help advance it.. Homes and businesses in this village are installing solar panels due to the lack of electricity. These solar panels make it possible for this town to function past sundown. 
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Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:26 AM

I believe solar energy will help improve living in places such as Bangladesh. With solar energy, it can provide light at night, store food, and help to produce and cook food. Telecommunications would also be easier to access.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:28 PM

Because of the rise in solar power energy it is allowing what I would consider a dark country is so important is because it is allowing the people of the area to have a longer day. Most people would be at home in the dark but with this cheap and affordable government funded solar panel they are able to have a longer day and seem to be able to be healthier lifestyle as they are not left out in the dark and able to go to a pharmacy at all times. These solar panels can run up to two light bulbs for ten hours allowing life to continue whether its dark or not.

Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 5:15 PM
Bangladesh is a very poor and undeveloped nation and most do not have access to electricity. For most of life before solar energy, people stopped when the sun went out. At first the people of Bangladesh did not believe in the idea of Solar energy but that is because they didn't know what it was and the good it could do. Within two years however people started to believe and know around one million homes have solar panels. This is the fastest expansion of solar panels in the world.  The solar panels are also cheap which help the villagers who do not bring in a lot of extra income. The fact that solar panels are actually attainable amenities in Bangladesh is key to villagers success in the modern world.
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Poop Stories

Poop Stories | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"From the time we’re about 6 years old, everyone loves a good poop joke, right? But is there something more meaningful lurking beneath the bathroom banter? Take a look at some international potty humor and then follow the jokes to a deeper understanding. Every laugh on this page reflects a life and death issue: the very real sanitation problems facing India today."

Taylor Doonan's insight:
This page tackles the problem of the lack of toilets in India. There are many comedians poking fun at the serious issues, which is not uncommon for comedians. Unfortunately these are serious issues, people are dying, especially children. 24% of girls drop out of school due to lack of proper toilets. Hopefully these comedians bring more light to the issue so it can begin to be addressed more seriously. 
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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:19 PM

It is fascinating that a country so many lives are lost due to something we find simple and trivial, and really do not even think about but use on a daily basis.

Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's curator insight, November 18, 2014 7:03 PM

World toilet day!

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:49 PM

Often when people are faced with a tragic fact they instantly attempt to shut it out because it makes them uncomfortable. In the same way Americans can walk past five homeless people a day and not bat and eye...its easier. Using comedy to address a dire situation such as India's sanitation standards, is an ingenious way to get people to actually listen

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Clean Water for All

A community in Bonsaaso, Ghana learns that their local water supply contains unsafe mineral concentrations. See how they implement a filtration system design...

 

Ghana is one of the more stable nations in the region, and yet even it has serious issues with fresh water. This video shows how low-tech solutions can combat the tainting of water by environmental factors such as mineral contamination of water sources. The $5,000 price tag for such technology seems high, but is very affordable considering the benefits given.  Another organization working on this issue is: http://waterwellsforafrica.org/


Via McDerder
Taylor Doonan's insight:
This video shows a water filter created by an engineer from Ghana and members of the community talking about how much the filter has helped them. The chemicals in the water made it unsafe to drink but this filter purifies the water to make it safe. 
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Do you know Africa?

Do you know Africa? | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

Many of Africa’s leaders will be in town next week attending a White House summit. The continent’s land is shared among 49 countries — many of which rarely make U.S. headlines. How familiar are you with Africa’s geography?

Taylor Doonan's insight:
This interactive map quizzes you on the location of the states of Africa and it shows the percentage of how many people found certain countries. South Africa, Madagascar and other more recognizable countries had higher percentages, but it is still a difficult quiz as many people do not know the geography of Africa. 
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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 2015 3:41 PM

http://lizardpoint.com/geography/africa-quiz.php

This is easier because it shows you the shape of the countries. As for this quiz, I can locate any African country but some of them, not precisely. I'm able to locate Ethiopia, Libya and Angola obviously because they're bigger but not Togo, Eritrea and Rwanda. However, I can closely locate the smaller countries but not precisely.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 2015 5:21 PM

I love interactive maps like this.  These are the best way to learn where things are in the world geographically.  Africa is the toughest, for myself, continent in the world to be able to locate and identify where certain countries are.  This is in part because Africa has so many countries and also Africa is a part of the world that is not often taught in school, therefore you have limited thoughts and ideas about these types of areas.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 22, 2015 1:54 PM

I have always been fascinated with Africa and its history. Through its history one can understand why Africa is the way it is today. Its a shame that Africa does not have more of a focus in the Public School Curriculum. Its played a huge part in developing western civilization, whether it be in ancient Alexandria providing grain for the Roman Republic or the coltan extracted through inhumane means in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Africa is a continent that has been raped and torn in a repetitive manor under a variety of foul experiences brought upon by western countries. These are the same western countries that are held of high interest and regards in subject manor instituted in the Public School System. Africa has also been apart of amazing developments of human civilization, for example the Trans Saharan Trade Route which linked Kingdoms such as Ancient Ghana to dynasties far in the Middle East. It is also the birthplace of man (no big deal). In either case there needs to be a stronger push on teaching/molding "Africa" (yes, I know... broad) into the curriculum. It is important in both understanding the history of the world, specifically western civilization and how it coined itself  “civilized.” Through introducing basic aspects, history, and dilemmas (both old and modern) it could inspire more interest and an expansion of knowledge from student to student. School is and will most likely continue to be Euro-centric and have large flares of Americana and other “themes” of North America. 

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Changing How We Think About Africa

Do you speak African? Well, neither do the 1 billion people on the continent.Africa is home to 54 different nations, more than 2,000 languages and four of the world's 10 fastest growing economies, but is often painted with a sweeping stroke of doom and gloom. In this week's Reality Check, Mehdi Hasan exposes popular misconceptions about the African continent.
Taylor Doonan's insight:
This video combats many misunderstandings about Africa, the biggest one being that many people view Africa as one nation instead of 54 unique nations. It also talks about how some African countries are on the rise and that women have a large role in many governments in Africa. The video aims to take away the stigma of war and poverty that goes along with Africa. 
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ThePlanetaryArchives/BlackHorseMedia - San Francisco's curator insight, March 11, 2016 6:23 PM

This short video is full of with examples and statistics that show that many of the 'doom and gloom' perspectives and ways of thinking about Africa are outdated (at best).  Here are some good facts to update how we talk about Africa. 

 

Tags: Africa, perspective.

Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, March 21, 2016 3:07 PM

This short video is full of with examples and statistics that show that many of the 'doom and gloom' perspectives and ways of thinking about Africa are outdated (at best).  Here are some good facts to update how we talk about Africa. 

 

Tags: Africa, perspective.

David Stiger's curator insight, November 10, 2018 4:43 PM
This video mentions that the Western world's negative, doom and gloom perception of Africa are "lazy" and this is important. Westerners may have become so accustomed to the colonial and post-colonial problems in Africa, that there is an outside attitude of "what good could possibly come from Africa - they are doomed and deserve our pity and charity." In reality, as this video points out, Africa is not just one single entity and its different players are on the rise. It is a continent of 54 separate countries containing 1 billion people who speak from a range of 2,000 languages. The video mentions that nearly one third of Africa is part of the middle class. With that said, in our geographic mental maps, it is time to start looking at Africa like the 'Tiger Countries of Asia', like South Korea, who blossomed into economic powerhouses. This is a fair comparison as Africa now has the ten fastest growing economies in the world, outpacing the West. With this line of thinking, Africa is a continent full of opportunity containing a lot of promising potential if given the chance. Interestingly, if white-Americans and white-Europeans improved their attitudes about the 54 countries of Africa (and saw them as capable societies) this would humanize non-white people in general and probably reduce racist, bigoted attitudes. 
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Who Likes Whom in The Middle East? Key players & Notable relationships

Who Likes Whom in The Middle East? Key players & Notable relationships | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
An interactive network visualisation of key players & notable relationships in the Middle East region. Continually updated. Awesome looking.
Taylor Doonan's insight:
This infograph is fun to play with and it shows who like who and who hates who in the middle east. it is interesting when you only look at the "love" reationships and realize how many nations don't have any. Though there are nations that  have no "love" relationships every one, but Oman, has at least two hate relationships, this is a great learning tool. 
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brielle blais's curator insight, April 1, 2018 4:45 PM
In geography it is important to understand what countries are enemies, what countries are alibis, and what countries have strained relationships. Without this knowledge, you really are left clueless to important relationships or causes to wars, or how each place affects another economy, politics, etc.
Corey Rogers's curator insight, December 15, 2018 12:40 AM
This chart is interesting, in that it shows the complex webbing of how each region is back by a certain country. It such a mess that trying to view this chart is such an eye sore, which is exactly how this region is, just a huge mess of a spider's web. 
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Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn

Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
During summer, the sun never sets in Sweden's northernmost town, posing challenges for Muslims observing the holy month.
Taylor Doonan's insight:
This article talks about the difficulty Muslims face during Ramadan when they are outside the middle east, specifically when they are in Sweden north of the arctic circle. This article follows a few different Muslims who have chosen different ways of fasting when sun up and sun down are not a good time table to go by. Some follow the times of their homes in the middle east, while some follow the time of Stockholm, the capitol of Sweden. The article also talked about one person who goes off of Istanbul's time because Turkey is the closest Muslim country to Sweden. Some of these people fear that they will not satisfy their god when fasting like this but others believe they have to do what they have to do. 
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