Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English)
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Health at Google talk by Dr Eric Topol

Health at Google talk by Dr Eric Topol | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Watching another great talk by Dr Eric Topol MD (this time at Google's office) and something struck me about a striking difference between the way Doctors talk about and understand the internet and...
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Opinion: Four digital health predictions that transpired at the Mobile World Congress

Opinion: Four digital health predictions that transpired at the Mobile World Congress | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
After attending the 4YFN (four years from now) at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona recently, digital health entrepreneur and nurse Anna Sort outlines four key predictions for the healthcare of the future.

Via Florian Morandeau, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Florian Morandeau's curator insight, March 11, 2019 2:38 AM

MWC prospection: Netflix for healthcare, the rise of self-diagnosis, innovation from within & gamification.

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Facebook, Twitter are blocking dangerous antivaccine posts. It’s about time l

Facebook, Twitter are blocking dangerous antivaccine posts. It’s about time l | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

In recent weeks, Pinterest, YouTube, Facebook, and Amazon have done something previously thought unimaginable: They’ve censored potentially dangerous health information, at last addressing a problem that started in the late 1990s.

In 1998, Andrew Wakefield, a British gastroenterologist, published a paper claiming that the combination measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine caused autism. The following year, in 1999, the U.S. Public Health Service, exercising an abundance of caution, asked pharmaceutical companies to eliminate the mercury-containing preservative, thimerosal, from most vaccines.

Many watching this one-two punch against vaccines worried about what would happen next. Such groups as Every Child by Two (now Vaccinate Your Family), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Immunization Action Coalition, the Autism Science Foundation, Parents of Kids with Infectious Diseases, the National Meningitis Association, and Meningitis Angels, among others, created websites and distributed educational materials about the importance of vaccines. Researchers performed dozens of studies showing that MMR didn’t increase the risk of autism and that the trace quantities of mercury in vaccines weren’t harmful. Indeed, Andrew Wakefield’s paper was later retracted when he was found to have misrepresented clinical information.

Nonetheless, as feared, the controversies surrounding MMR and thimerosal created a foothold for anti-vaccine groups.

 

During the following 15 years, organizations like the National Vaccine Information Center (formerly Dissatisfied Parents Together), Generation Rescue, Moms Against Mercury, and Safe Minds became the one-stop shop for mainstream media outlets interested in airing parents’ concerns about vaccines.

The results were predictable.

Influenced by thousands of television shows, radio programs, and newspaper articles, a critical number of parents stopped vaccinating their children. As a consequence, measles infections, which were eliminated from the United States by 2000, came roaring back. An outbreak starting in Disneyland in 2014 spread from California to 24 other states. Now hundreds of children whose parents have chosen not to vaccinate them are infected with measles every year. Many are hospitalized. When hundreds become thousands, children again will start dying from measles.

But the tide is turning. Mainstream media, in the face of overwhelming scientific evidence supporting the safety of vaccines, realizes that there aren’t two sides to this story. Also, nothing educates like outbreaks.

Although marginalized, activists haven’t given up, turning their attention from mainstream media to social media, where their misinformation continues to cause harm. It is here that the anti-vaccine groups have thrived. Anti-vaccine blogs, websites, books, live streamings, podcasts, chat rooms, and Facebook pages dominate the landscape.

Recently, and surprisingly, social media outlets have started to push back. Pinterest now bars searches for vaccine content. YouTube no longer allows anti-vaccine groups to monetize their videos with ads. Facebook fact-checks health articles to determine which will appear less prominently in news feeds. And Amazon has started removing anti-vaccine documentaries from its video streaming service.

In response, anti-vaccine groups have cried foul, arguing that these actions represent an abridgment of their First Amendment right to free speech. The law, however, has historically set limits on that right. In 1919, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., in Schenck v. United States, reasoned that free speech did not extend to “falsely shouting fire in a crowded movie theater causing a panic.” Holmes argued that to do so might cause people to be hurt or killed while running for the exits. The same is true here. By unnecessarily scaring parents, hundreds of children are getting trampled every year.

 

To their credit, several prominent social media sites are no longer waiting for children to die from preventable infections before silencing those doing the shouting.

Paul A. Offit, M.D., is director of the Vaccine Education Center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and a professor of pediatrics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. He also is a member of the Inquirer’s Health Advisory Panel.


Via nrip
cinternetmarketer's curator insight, March 13, 2019 5:59 AM
 
Timothy Cappos's comment June 18, 2019 11:43 PM
This is great news! I am happy that social media platform like Facebook and Twitter have taken action to censor harmful media lately.
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First quantitative AI tools for medical imaging receive clearance

First quantitative AI tools for medical imaging receive clearance | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
The FDA has now cleared the radiology software product Quantib™ ND for distribution in the US.

Via Florian Morandeau, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Florian Morandeau's curator insight, March 12, 2019 2:22 AM

Quantib AI software using machine learning for radiologists, has just received FDA clearance.

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AI research programme launched in London to develop use in healthcare

AI research programme launched in London to develop use in healthcare | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
An artificial intelligence (AI) research programme has been launched in London which aims to develop the use of the technology in healthcare.

Composed of five projects, the CAP-AI programme is focused on developing the use of AI in healthcare in London with the aim of improving patient care.

This involves project teams from Barts Health NHS Trust and Queen Mary University of London supporting a London-based Small/Medium Enterprise (SME) to deliver their project, with the aim of creating a new product that can be commercialised.

Two projects are already underway – the first led by Vascular Consultant, Sandip Sarkar from Barts and in partnership with AI-start-up Motilent.

This particular project aims to use AI to predict how congenital ascending aortic aneurysm, an unpredictable and potentially deadly condition, is likely to develop in patients.

Another project, is iPlato Healthcare working with Queen Mary which aims to use AI to improve the treatment options for the thousands of patients across the UK with musculoskeletal (MSK) problems.

Sven Bunn, programme director Barts Life Science – the research arm at Barts, said: “This collaboration between the NHS, higher education and AI start-ups makes it possible for us to explore AI’s true potential in healthcare.

Via Dominique Godefroy, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Physicians digital healthcare landscape

Physicians digital healthcare landscape | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

According to a recent comScore study, physicians spend 48% of their online time on professional sites. According to the study, the top sites in HCP and General Health Content are part of the WebMD network, while for the Social Media category, Sermo is the first one.

 
 Top Site per Category by Percent Reach% Reach of Physicians Online- HCP ContentMedscape.com57%- General Health ContentWebMD.com20.5%- AssociationAAFP.org17.0%- Pharma SupportDoctorDirectory.com22.0%- PharmaceuticalsWyeth.com6.3%- GovernmentNIH.gov30.5%- Health & WellnessThatsfit.com8.3%- Social MediaSermo.com21.3%- InsuranceUcomparehealthcare.com11.3%- Physician LocatorHealthgrades.com26.0%- ClinicClinicaloptions.com3.5%- Pharmacy ServicesAllscripts.com3.5%

Source: comScore


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GSK asthma app wins healthcare technology award 

GSK asthma app wins healthcare technology award  | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

GlaxoSmithKline mobile app that helps asthma patients better understand their condition and how to manage it was one of six winners at the AXA PPP Health Tech & You Awards.
MyAsthma, which was developed with UK agency The Earthworks, can track medicine usage and asthma attacks, and use location, weather and air quality data to learn what trigger’s a patient’s asthma.


An industry first, GSK’s app is the first from pharma has been approved as a Class 1 medical device and CE marked.


Via Alex Butler
Denise Silber's curator insight, May 16, 2017 3:30 AM
Key insight here is that the app is CE marked as a device.
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Is social media right for pharma?

Is social media right for pharma? | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

KEY TAKEAWAY: GWI Social examined the very latest figures for social media engagement, social behaviors and trends within the social space.  Among the key findings…filling up spare time is the main reason for using social media among 16-24s, while older groups see these platforms as a way to keep up with friends and the news.  But is social media right for pharma?

Almost every internet user can now be reached via social media – 94% of digital consumers aged 16-64 say they have an account on at least one social platform and 98% have visited/used one within the last month.  So then, is social media a channel for pharma to reach patients?


Pfizer is using Facebook as an ad platform, but are men really going to click on the ad because Viagra now comes in individual dosage envelopes?

Facebook has become a media rich RSS feed with users following interests and participating in social media activism via the share button.  We can easily express outrage by simply sharing content we agree with but as facebook seems to know where we have been on the web and what we have done will “suggested post” health content become too intrusive?


In research, earlier this year, a lot of older facebook users were surprised to have suggested content appear in their facebook feed.  A number of older women said they were offended and shocked that facebook seemed to know what health content they were researching online.

So is social media right for pharma?  In some cases, yes.  At a minimum pharma should be listening to what patients are saying about their product as well as competitors’ products and using the input for content that addresses questions/concerns.


As for advertising on social media there are opportunities, but rather than advertise “single packs” perhaps Pfizer would do better to talk about men’s health as a way to engage the social media audience.


Via Plus91, Rémy TESTON
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Engaging patients online can improve chronic disease management

Engaging patients online can improve chronic disease management | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

The majority of patients (91%) with a chronic health condition need more help managing their disease.

One in five patients feel anxious or frustrated dealing with their chronic disease. Nearly four out of ten patients with a chronic condition admit they are only somewhat knowledgeable about how to best manage their health. A majority of patients want additional support from their providers, and nine out of 10 of those who want help managing a chronic condition say assistance from their provider would make a difference in their overall state of health.

Those responses are from a survey of 502 patients conducted by West Corp. and released in February at HIMSS 2017 in Orlando, Fla.

These findings also signal a need for more patient engagement in chronic care, and point to opportunities for healthcare organizations and providers to achieve better clinical and financial outcomes.

Web-enabled technology such as automated surveys allow providers to routinely monitor chronic patients.
 
 

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The emotional burden of chronic disease is challenging enough for patients. But in addition to the fear, anxiety and frustration chronic patients feel, many also say they lack the knowledge and confidence necessary to successfully manage their health.

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44% of patients surveyed are only somewhat confident, at best, they are effectively managing their condition, and over half (59%) of patients with a chronic illness believe they are not doing everything they should be doing to manage their condition. As a result, one in five (20%) chronic patients rate their ability to manage their condition as fair or poor at best.

A lot of patients simply do not have a good grasp on health metrics—meaning they either don’t know what their current health metrics are, or they do not know what they should be. 43% of patients are only somewhat confident they know their current numbers for things like blood pressure and cholesterol. What’s more, even when patients do know their numbers, it is not guaranteed that they understand what those numbers mean. To make sense of health metrics and chronic disease management, patients need support from their healthcare providers

One in five patients feel they need 24-hour disease management assistance. Traditionally, chronic care has been delivered during face-to-face doctor visits. However, this outdated approach to chronic care does not support patients when and where they need help. Providers can help patients do a better job of managing their health by supporting them not just during office visits, but also at home and in daily life – where patients desire more assistance, especially online.

According to the survey, at least 70% of patients with a chronic condition would like more resources or clarity on how to manage their disease. Close to a third of patients say a better understanding of how to change unhealthy behaviors (35%), a more individualized treatment plan (33%) or tips and tools for handling their condition (31%) would help them be more effective in their treatment.

Providers must seize engagement opportunities

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There are many different ways providers can engage patients and support them between visits. As the West survey findings show, patients desire personalized and targeted communications and information, and they also want regular check-ins from providers. Three-quarters (75%) of chronic patients want their healthcare provider to contact them regularly and alert them if anything looks wrong (only 30% of patients report receiving regular check-ins to review their progress).

Web-enabled technology such as automated surveys allow providers to routinely monitor chronic patients, escalate cases where patients are at risk, and intervene before patients reach the point of needing acute care. According to the survey, there is untapped potential for using patient surveys. Just 5% percent of providers say they use survey check-ins that ask patients for feedback about treatment plans.

Biometric monitoring devices like heart rate monitors and blood pressure cuffs offer similar benefits as patient surveys. When asked to choose between a one-way and two-way monitoring device, more patients (53%) prefer a two-way device. These tools provide additional opportunities to engage and monitor patients at home, and could be leveraged more by providers.

CMS penalties and incentives

Potentially avoidable readmissions are costing hospitals $528 million in Medicare penalties for the 2017 fiscal year. Healthcare organizations know that reducing preventable readmissions is in their best interest financially, but many do not realize that they are missing opportunities to prevent readmissions by proactively engaging chronic patients.

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In January 2015, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services began reimbursing chronic care management (CCM) services for qualified Medicare beneficiaries who have at least two chronic conditions expected to last longer than a year. CPT code 99490 reimbursement varies from state to state, but generally CMS reimburses at approximately $42.60 per beneficiary (every month) to physicians for implementing processes to manage patients outside of the clinical setting.

With government incentivizing chronic care management, and patients demanding it, providers can more successfully manage chronic diseases by more effectively engaging and supporting chronic patients.

Fonda Narke is director of product integration, West Corp. Healthcare Practice


Via Plus91, Esposito Christelle, DIRECT MEDICA by Webhelp
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The True Vision of Big Data in Healthcare

The True Vision of Big Data in Healthcare | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

From the impact of wearable technology to the potential for boosting cancer research, there’s been a lot of buzz about big data in the healthcare space. However, the true vision of big data in healthcare lies not in individual data collection or disparate applications, but in the potential of combining healthcare data to create new resources for doctors.

New Data Sources

To conduct a recent study, researchers turned to data on social media to identify measures for stress by identifying tweets with hostile or negative language. They then turned the data into a color-coded map to predict the potential of heart disease in any given location. When researchers cross-checked their findings with a map created by traditional research, the maps were nearly identical. Based on the results, the researchers believe using external data sources to conduct big data research will be just as reliable and faster than traditional means.

Predictive Medicine

By combining disparate data sources, healthcare practitioners can also better identify patients who are at risk of developing a chronic disease and better suggest preventive tests and treatments. In addition to individual care, data can be used to identify potential disease outbreaks or hot spots, so the disease source can be quickly identified and contained.

Complete Patient Records

The healthcare industry has been notorious for its poor management of patient records. Individual health data is typically scattered across multiple files in different offices, and what is stored electronically is rarely shared between doctors. In addition, the majority of healthcare data is currently unstructured, making it difficult to sort through that data for patterns. By developing a structured system for tracking patient data, and combining data both from doctors and other sources, such as genetics and social media, healthcare professionals will have a complete profile of the patient allowing them to make better judgments and avoid costly mistakes.

Administrative Streamlining

Hospital administration consists of many moving parts. From ensuring machinery is operating properly to keeping doctors and nurses updated on the latest research and medical training. Even a basic BLS certification training takes extra time and coordination that keeps doctors away from treating patients. Companies that specialize in developing software that collects best practice information are turning to big data search engines to aggregate data, so they update best practice and patient outcome data in near real-time. By having this data readily available, doctors will be able to avoid unnecessary tests and streamline their own education.

The impact of big data on the healthcare industry is only beginning to be realized. While big data can and will be used to improve current processes, much of the benefit will come from new systems and technology that combine healthcare data with other sources to produce new insights.


Via Plus91
Massissilia AROUF's curator insight, October 26, 2016 3:25 AM
The True Vision of #BigData in #Healthcare
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Is Pharma Ready to Realize the Value of mHealth?

Is Pharma Ready to Realize the Value of mHealth? | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

mHealth experts at Partners' Connected Health Symposium say digital health tools could improve everything from clinical trials to drug efficacy. But progress is slow.When Apple launched its ResearchKit platform in 2015, healthcare providers and the pharma industry hailed the mHealth platform as a meaningful step toward better clinical trials.They’re starting to see that pay off.


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Can You Gamify Health? | Huffington Post

Can You Gamify Health? | Huffington Post | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Have you ever made a resolution to acquire a healthier lifestyle by changing your behaviour? Whether you wanted to be less stressed, cut out junk food, or stop smoking, you probably defined some simple rules and rewards to influence your behaviour and hopefully achieve that goal. When you applied those rules, you were in fact practicing “gamification”, the process of applying game mechanics to a real-life situation in order to generate a desired outcome. Unfortunately, you didn’t have the resources to turn those ideas into an exciting app.

Via Giuseppe Fattori
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Study: Wearable Fitness Trackers May Do More Harm Than Good

Study: Wearable Fitness Trackers May Do More Harm Than Good | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
If you've been wearing a fitness tracker and have been disappointed in the results you've received, you're not alone. Results may not be as advertised.
Via Pharma Guy
Pharma Guy's curator insight, September 28, 2016 9:24 AM

Alsop read: “Most Blood Pressure Monitoring Apps are Untested, Inaccurate and Even Bogus!”; http://sco.lt/6m9OFN

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Apple Watch Saves Man's Life

Apple Watch Saves Man's Life | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
A couple of people are giving the Apple Watch credit for saving their lives.

 

According to British tabloid The Sun a man’s life has been saved by his Apple Watch. The paper reports that Dennis Anselmo, a 62-year-old builder, felt “terrible” after taking lunch. Anselmo had a rest, and during that time looked at his Apple AAPL -1.14% Watch, checking his pulse. He discovered that it was well over twice what it should be, registering 210 beats per minute.

Anselmo then called for an ambulance, and at hospital was later told that had he gone home he may well have died. Instead the doctors were able to clear his arterial blockage and he’s now doing well. And Anselmo isn’t the first person to claim that their Apple Watch has saved their life either.


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The Prospects of Behavioral Genetics: Bad Genes Behind Crimes, Precision Education And Loosing Free Will?

The Prospects of Behavioral Genetics: Bad Genes Behind Crimes, Precision Education And Loosing Free Will? | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Advances in genetics seem to shift the balance in the nature vs nurture debate towards the former. We looked at whether crimes could be blamed at bad genes.
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No longer artificial – AI in pharma and healthcare

No longer artificial – AI in pharma and healthcare | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Eleven years is a long time to be writing about ‘digital pharma’, and I do indeed remember when it was all My First Twitter Account and iPhone Apps as far as the eye could see.

Over those years some technologies have entered the digital health mainstream, while others have failed to live up to their promise, never emerging from what Gartner’s Hype Cycle terms the Trough of Disillusionment.

Stuck in those doldrums we might find, amongst others, Google Glass, Google’s smart contact lens and Nokia’s digital health ambitions, but one tech sector that is living up to the hype is artificial intelligence (AI).

It has certainly featured on its fair share of ‘next big thing in health tech’ lists over the years, but the last few months have seen a real sense of momentum build around the area.

To stick with Gartner’s Hype Cycle model for a moment, AI in pharma and healthcare is being rapidly driven up by what the consultants term the Slope of Enlightenment and towards the Plateau of Productivity.

Gathering pace

The headwinds for this were certainly there in 2018, when all the signs were that AI in pharma was on the rise.

For healthcare systems the focus is on faster, more effective diagnosis and the cost-savings in treatment – and health benefits – that catching diseases early could bring.

Via Dominique Godefroy, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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AI research programme launched in London to develop use in healthcare

AI research programme launched in London to develop use in healthcare | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
An artificial intelligence (AI) research programme has been launched in London which aims to develop the use of the technology in healthcare.

Composed of five projects, the CAP-AI programme is focused on developing the use of AI in healthcare in London with the aim of improving patient care.

This involves project teams from Barts Health NHS Trust and Queen Mary University of London supporting a London-based Small/Medium Enterprise (SME) to deliver their project, with the aim of creating a new product that can be commercialised.

Two projects are already underway – the first led by Vascular Consultant, Sandip Sarkar from Barts and in partnership with AI-start-up Motilent.

This particular project aims to use AI to predict how congenital ascending aortic aneurysm, an unpredictable and potentially deadly condition, is likely to develop in patients.

Another project, is iPlato Healthcare working with Queen Mary which aims to use AI to improve the treatment options for the thousands of patients across the UK with musculoskeletal (MSK) problems.

Sven Bunn, programme director Barts Life Science – the research arm at Barts, said: “This collaboration between the NHS, higher education and AI start-ups makes it possible for us to explore AI’s true potential in healthcare.

Via Dominique Godefroy
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5 health care organizations that make the most of social media

5 health care organizations that make the most of social media | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

Health care marketers can’t afford to ignore social media.

With the right strategy, organizations can increase campaign awareness, gain community support, and garner insight from a like-minded community of professionals and individuals.

For health care organizations, social media marketing must revolve around the brand while still engaging audiences and holding their attention.

Skyword.com offered the following examples of five health care organizations that have developed and maintained compelling social media marketing strategies.

Cleveland Clinic

 

The nonprofit academic medical center has a strong presence on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn. It has created a welcoming, knowledgeable and community-centric personality by featuring people-centered and approachable photography, along with posts about local interests and friendly stories from its blog that answer common questions.


By focusing on the needs of its audience, Cleveland Clinic has developed an engaged social community on mulitple platforms.

Quest Diagnostics

The home page of this Fortune 500 organization’s website addresses both B2C and B2B audiences and includes a special social media section that enables visitors to connect directly with brand managers on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter.

All of Quest Diagnostics’ social media accounts reflect the company’s professional, yet approachable, tone through simple, warm, supportive language that helps audiences feel like members of the community.

 
 
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Communicators also spotlight their employees, which humanizes the clinical brand.


Philips Healthcare

 

This health-centric division of the larger Philips brand is focused on creating a better future through its wellness-related products and services. This mission is reflected in its social media marketing strategy, which features an array of content based on its advances in health care and technology.

Its “Innovations in Health” group on LinkedIn comprises a select community of health care professionals, which speaks to an audience interested in the latest health care solutions. This has resulted in an exclusive community of over 140,000 members with a passion for health care and technological innovation at both the professional and consumer level. This community ultimately gives Philips Healthcare abundant insight and knowledge that can be used for future innovation.

Johnson & Johnson

 

The company has led the way for health care brands in social media marketing by establishing its own unique tone. Rather than merely posting and tweeting about its latest news, brand managers create and share content with a comprehensive focus.


This strategy shows that the company understands its audience and their interests enough to develop and endorse content that’s both relevant and timely. Brand managers deeply engage their online following and keep them returning for more.

Orlando Health

 

This not-for-profit health care network has established a social personality that feels upbeat, warm and personal. Its social media posts span a wide range of initiatives and interests, such as informational stories about better well-being, adorable photos of therapy dogs and the latest local news. Every post displays its passion for its people.


 
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Primary care doctors should offer or refer low-risk patients to behavioral counseling to prevent heart disease. https://cards.twitter.com/cards/rbxgc/43v8u ;…

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More Exercise & Better Diet: How to Cut Your Heart Disease Riskorlandohealth.com
 
 
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Orlando Health overcomes the challenge of creating a friendly and fun social media personality by incorporating a holistic wellness approach with a focus on the needs of both the individual and the larger community.


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Virtual Reality Has a Bright Future in Healthcare

Virtual Reality Has a Bright Future in Healthcare | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Virtual reality has the ability to dramatically transform the healthcare industry. Here are four of the most exciting use cases.

Via Jerome Leleu
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The patient expert

The patient expert | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Online medical communities and social media have given rise to the patient expert, a newly important facet in pharma’s relationship with healthcare.

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Study questions doctor judgement on personal social media accounts

Study questions doctor judgement on personal social media accounts | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

Not even doctors are immune from inappropriate social media posts. Young doctors often have "unprofessional" or offensive content on their Facebook profiles, a new study suggests.

The study, of newly graduated urologists, found that nearly three-quarters had publicly identifiable Facebook profiles. And 40 percent of them contained unprofessional or "potentially objectionable" content.

That ranged from profanity and images of drunkenness, to clear violations of medical ethics -- such as divulging a patient's health information.

The researchers said the findings add to concerns over how doctors' social media use -- if not thought out -- could potentially erode patients' trust.

"I think we all have a role to play in making sure the high standards of patient confidentiality and the doctor-patient relationship are upheld," said lead researcher Dr. Kevin Koo.

Koo is a urology resident at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, in Lebanon, N.H.

The study is not the first to bring attention to doctors' social media use.

The issue has been on the medical profession's radar for a while, said Dr. Matthew DeCamp, of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics in Baltimore.

Several professional societies, and some university medical centers, already have guidelines that call on doctors to use social media with care.

The American Medical Association, for instance, issued guidelines in 2010. They encourage doctors to "consider separating personal and professional content online." They also stress the importance of "appropriate professional boundaries" with patients, and never violating patients' privacy.

But it's not clear how often those messages get through to doctors, said DeCamp, who was not involved in the study.

"It's concerning that professional guidelines may not be having the intended effect," he said.

Koo agreed it's not clear how many doctors "even know that guidelines exist."

For the study, Koo's team queried Facebook with the names of 281 doctors who graduated from U.S. urology residency programs in 2015.

The investigators found that 72 percent had a publicly identifiable Facebook profile.

Next, the researchers looked for content deemed unprofessional or at least potentially offensive. They found such content in 40 percent of the profiles.

Unprofessional content included images or references to drunkenness, drug use or "unlawful behavior." It also included posts that divulged protected patient information.

There were several cases of that, the study found. One post showed X-rays where a patient's name was visible; others gave enough details that the patient could be identified -- like describing complications that happened during surgery on a specific date.

Using social media that way is clearly wrong, DeCamp said. "Sharing patient information is egregious," he added.

In other cases, he noted, it's not so black-and-white.

The category of "potentially objectionable" content included images of doctors holding an alcoholic drink, for instance -- or posts expressing opinions on politics, religion or controversial social issues.

So should doctors not be allowed to offend anyone online?

No one expects doctors to never post an opinion, Koo said. "We realize they don't live in a vacuum," he added.

Still, according to DeCamp, there is reason for doctors to consider how posting their views will influence people.

It could be argued, he said, that doctors shouldn't lend their "trusted position" to a political cause that is unrelated to medicine, for instance.

Can doctors solve the problem by simply never "friending" a patient, and keeping all personal posts out of public view? And should they, as guidelines suggest, have a separate "professional" online identity?

DeCamp said he believes it's impossible to have two separate "identities." Instead, he suggested that doctors take the time to consider their posts carefully: "Ask yourself if this is something you really want in a public space," he said.

Some doctors' online personas have already affected them in the real world, Koo and colleagues noted.

One study found that 92 percent of U.S. state medical boards had investigated online professionalism violations. Most were reported by patients or their family members.

The study was published online recently in the journal BJU International.


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Pinterest or Instagram for Pharmaceutical Marketing? Spoiler: It's Both.

Pinterest or Instagram for Pharmaceutical Marketing? Spoiler: It's Both. | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

Yes, it’s true that you’re a busy pharmaceutical communications exec: Why would you add another online channel to your already-loaded pharma marketing toolkit? Especially since Pinterest and Instagram are basically the same: Both are image-driven social media platforms, using visuals in marketing that encourage sharing and engage your target audience.

 

But that’s where the similarities end. Pinterest and Instagram have distinct purposes and applications, so a better question is: Why would you limit your reach and capabilities by choosing one over the other? Consider the primary function of each…

 

  • Pinterest: A platform that enables you to curate visual content that you’ve found online and would like to share with your community.

 

  • Instagram: A platform that enables you to capture visual content that you find engaging and would like to share with your community.

 

So, it’s curate versus capture. But when you dig a little deeper…

 

  • A Pinterest user focuses on discovery of other user’s content in common areas of interest. The platform is similar to a search engine that can be customized to seek out specific content, how-to’s, inspiration, and products. A user gathers the content by “pinning” it to their visual idea-board in relevant groups. Pinterest incorporates the classic characteristics of social media, so users can share their boards, follow the boards of others, and comment on content.

 

  • Instagram users seek to share pictures and videos that they’ve captured from their own mobile device – which they can first enhance by incorporating special effects, applying filters, and adding captions. The content isn’t just shared on the platform; rather, a user can transition Instagram visuals over to Facebook and other social networks.

 

Now you can see how the distinction between the two is quite profound. You can also understand that different types of messages and images will resonate with users on Pinterest as compared to Instagram – because they’re active on these platforms for entirely different reasons. You can’t optimize engagement, raise brand awareness, and develop a loyal following without understanding which one to use, for what reasons, and when.

 

When to Use What

 

Linking: When you pin an image on Pinterest, it will include a link to the source of the content on an external site. If that external site is yours, you drive website traffic every time someone clicks on the pin, increase that traffic potential exponentially every time someone re-pins it, and boost SEO.

 

When you post an image on Instagram and share it across other social media channels, they’re directed to that content’s individual link. That person isn’t heading to your website, but to the Instagram-generated link and your profile.

 

  • Linking Advantage: Pinterest

 

Storytelling: You tell your stories on Pinterest through the stories of others, on the themed boards you create to gather your pins. It’s possible to distribute promotions and hold contests to engage your audience and invite them into your story.

 

Instagram users are seeking a more personalized experience when they engage with brands on the platform. Because you’re posting content that you create yourself, you can establish a more individual connection between your company and the user. Instagram content is consumable through quick captions, images, and video clips – unique content that communicates information about the products you offer.

 

  • Storytelling Advantage: Instagram

 

Target Audience: Woman account for roughly 85 percent of Pinterest users, a figure that represents that largest gender differential on all social networks. When you consider that women are more likely to seek health information online as compared to men (85 and 75 percent, respectively), SEO becomes a factor – making the advantages of Pinterest clear.

 

Still, Instagram has more active monthly users, at 500 million compared to Pinterest’s 150 million according to 2016 figures. So if it’s breadth you seek with pharma marketing, Instagram may be your best bet.

 

  • Target Audience Advantage: Too Close to Tell

 

There’s no clear winner between Pinterest and Instagram, but there is a clear point: You want to use one over the other, depending on your goal. The key is understanding the different users of each platform and why they’re hanging out there


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The Internet of Things is transforming health care, but there's one huge risk

The Internet of Things is transforming health care, but there's one huge risk | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
From fitness trackers to medical devices that track specific conditions such as Huntington's disease or asthma, technology and healthcare companies are increasingly joining forces to utilize the Internet of Things to better monitor patients' health and help prevent diseases. The possibilities for both device makers and Big Pharma to collaborate with tech companies are vast, which is no surprise given that more than $3 trillion was spent on healthcare in the U.S. in 2014, and likely even more than that in 2015, according to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.
Via Alex Butler
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Asthma tracking startup Propeller Health takes in $21.5 million to grow and go global

Asthma tracking startup Propeller Health takes in $21.5 million to grow and go global | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Imagine not being able to breathe and imagine that loss of breath coming out of nowhere. It's a frightening position to be in, but one company, Propeller..

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FDA approves Medtronic's 'artificial pancreas' for diabetes

FDA approves Medtronic's 'artificial pancreas' for diabetes | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Medtronic Plc won U.S. approval on Wednesday for an "artificial pancreas" that is the first device to automatically deliver the right dose of insulin to patients with type 1 diabetes, freeing them from continually monitoring insulin levels throughout each day.
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A Pill That Monitors Your Vital Signs

A Pill That Monitors Your Vital Signs | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Vital signs are key indicators of health. But tracking some of these signals, such as the body’s core temperature, can require invasive tactics—which is especially problematic for active or injured patients. Almost anyone, however, can swallow a pill.
Via Philippe Marchal, eMedToday
John Maughan's curator insight, June 10, 2016 9:27 AM
Inner Space 2 - we many not be able to miniaturize ourselves but we can do things today that were sci-fi in 1987.