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Dementia (Focus on Dementia)

Overview An estimated 93,000 people have dementia in Scotland in 2017. Around 3,200 of these people are under the age of 65. As our population ages, the number of people with dementia will increase; we expect the number to double over the next 25 years.
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CELCIS news story: tell us your stories about compassionate care

CELCIS news story: tell us your stories about compassionate care | Social services news | Scoop.it
CELCIS, SSSC and the Care Inspectorate are producing a new resource to promote, maintain and develop compassionate care across the social care sector.
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Designing for the future - Media Releases - Newsroom - NES

News release on event leading change by design of public services in the future...
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Impact: The 3rd Health and Social Care Integration Event Tickets, Mon 20 May 2019 at 09:30

Impact: The 3rd Health and Social Care Integration Event Tickets, Mon 20 May 2019 at 09:30 | Social services news | Scoop.it
The ALLIANCE Annual Conference and AGM, ‘Impact: the 3rd Health and Social Care Integration event’, will take place on Monday 20 May 2019 in Glasgow. The  2019 conference will consider the impact integration has had over the last three years, what still needs to be done and how organisations can...
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Social media impacting young people's mental health, says Prince's Trust - Glasgow Live

Social media impacting young people's mental health, says Prince's Trust - Glasgow Live | Social services news | Scoop.it
22-year-old Glaswegian Reece Hayes has shared his story and is urging young people to reach out to the charity for help...
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Support for young carers - Information and support - Macmillan Cancer Support

Support for young carers - Information and support - Macmillan Cancer Support | Social services news | Scoop.it
If you're caring for a parent or relative with cancer, it's important that you're supported too. Support groups, young carers' projects and social workers, charities and online forums can help. If you're worried about money, you be be able to get a benefit called Carer's Allowance.
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‘Time to Talk’ about mental health? –

‘Time to Talk’ about mental health? – | Social services news | Scoop.it
The 7th February 2019 is ‘Time to Talk Day’, a UK wide initiative, run in Wales by Time to Change Wales. The aim: to end the stigma and discrimination faced by people with mental health problems.Set up in 2012, Time to Change Wales is run by the mental health charities Mind Cymru and Hafal,…...
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Our Voice and Health and Social Care Integration

Our Voice and Health and Social Care Integration | Social services news | Scoop.it
Health and Social Care Integration presents a great opportunity to improve the level of involvement of people in the design and delivery of services.It is a requirement of the integration legislation to include representatives from the third sector, people with experience as a carer and people with...
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Budget control hinders social and health integration in Scotland | Public Finance

Budget control hinders social and health integration in Scotland | Public Finance | Social services news | Scoop.it
The unwillingness of public bodies to relinquish control of budgets is hindering the integration of health and social care in Scotland.
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A social worker abroad’s take on Brexit

A social worker abroad’s take on Brexit | Social services news | Scoop.it
Professional Social Work magazine - 5 February 2019 Brexit – the culmination of a misguided project creating division and turmoil, and fanning the flames of resentment It was presented as a rare moment of triumph for prime minister Theresa May. After heated debate on 29 January the House of Commons passed the Brady amendment calling for a renegotiation of the EU withdrawal agreement. The next day, it was reported that the prime minister would be flying back to Brussels to reopen negotiations. Nothing unusual there... except that pictures of May leaving Downing Street were accompanied by footage of Lancaster bombers leaving Biggin Hill during World War II heading for the English Channel. This may have been a simple mix-up by the BBC, but it was a Freudian slip of enormous significance, reminding viewers abroad of Britain's earlier sorties with its European neighbours, embarked upon with Churchillian spirit to protect our borders and national heritage. By coincidence, the images had remarkable symmetry with many of the underlying arguments used by arch Brexiteers such as Nigel Farage and Boris Johnson during the Referendum campaign to explain why Britain should leave the EU. The footage of May heading for Brussels, and by implication travelling in a Lancaster bomber, was shown on news channels in Finland, Germany, France, and indeed throughout Europe. Unsurprisingly, many politicians and viewers drew negative and somewhat sinister conclusions. The people of Europe had never quite understood why the UK wished to leave the EU, but now they knew - the veil had been lifted to reveal what Brexit was really all about! The German commentator Oliver Welke, from the ZDF Heute political satire show said: “Es sieht aus, als ob die Englander immer noch im Krieg sind und zu den Tagen des Imperiums zurückkehren wollen” (it looks like the English are still at war and want to return to the days of empire). To understand how this could have happened we should go back to the Referendum in June 2016. The Referendum debate When he was prime minister, David Cameron called the Referendum to settle 'the question of Europe' and unite a bitterly divided Tory party. But his decision to try and renegotiate the UK's relationship with the EU beforehand went down like a lead balloon with other European leaders. After acrimonious negotiations long into the night, a compromise was struck that allowed Mr Cameron to return from Brussels with a deal he could claim protected Britain's interests. In fact, all he had achieved was little more than an agreement the UK could impose an “emergency brake” on migrant benefits for seven years. This was a move designed to appease Euro-sceptics in his party and get around the principle of free movement by making conditions for migrants less attractive, thereby helping to reduce the level of immigration. The Referendum debate itself was one of the most bitter, ill-informed and misleading debates I have ever witnessed. It was characterised by exaggerated claims, misinformation and promises that could never be kept from leading proponents on both sides. A highly complex issue was reduced to a simple binary choice between leave and remain, saturated with bold emotional statements and political spin. Britain has always had an uneasy relationship with the EU since the time of Margaret Thatcher who resisted moves towards closer European integration – something successive UK governments have slavishly followed. Although a number of relevant issues were debated during the referendum debate, including, agricultural policy, fishing, cost of EU membership, immigration and free movement, possible trade deals a la Canada or Norway, the consequences of leaving were never properly set out.  Significantly, the Irish border issue that subsequently became a major sticking point, was never discussed. News footage of goods in lorries passing swiftly through Norwegian customs into the EU in Sweden were shown with reassuring commentary suggesting post Brexit trade could run smoothly. Those leading the Remain campaign embarked on what became known as 'project fear' and over hyped the projected long-term effects of leaving. This took priority over calmly and rationally setting out balanced arguments about the many benefits of EU membership. Cameron badly misjudged the public mood. This was not a mistake Vote Leave intended to make. However, they countered by making exaggerated claims about the true cost of EU membership and promising the EU membership fee of £350 million a week going to Brussels would be redirected to the NHS. Vote Leave also drew heavily on fears about excessive immigration, EU boats plundering our fishing stocks and our apparent inability to deport EU citizens committing crime – claiming they all could be solved by the UK controlling its borders and sending EU citizens without jobs home. The public were assured a trading deal with the EU could be negotiated as member states imported more goods from us than we imported from them and would not want to risk losing this trade. When Vote Leave won, a crestfallen Cameron immediately resigned and Theresa May took over as Tory party leader and prime minister. Some say this was because there was no other reliable candidate capable of uniting the Conservatives. George Osborne swiftly left as chancellor to become editor of the London Evening Standard and a new team of largely untried and inexperienced ministers were appointed. May was handed the “poisoned challis” of trying to keep the Conservative party together and simultaneously open negotiations with the EU to produce a withdrawal agreement. On 29 March 2017, she formally invoked article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, which set the clock ticking on the UK's withdrawal from the EU two years later. And with Brexiteer David Davis as the new Brexit secretary, there was cautious optimism of negotiating a good deal. However,  it was not long before guarded optimism was replaced by an injection of realism at the difficulties of overcoming the many pitfalls in the long winding road ahead. A bewildered looking May confirmed this by doing the rounds on television saying that “no deal is better than a bad deal” - words that would come back to haunt her. So what went wrong? Bitter negotiations that led to May's withdrawal deal May's current dilemmas over Brexit is the culmination of bitter negotiations over the past two-and- a-half years. The team was led at different times by three Brexit ministers supported by a host of civil servants, and the EU side led by chief negotiator Michel Barnier. Negotiations have been a shambles. From the outset, it became clear the UK was reluctant to set out its position, and instead attempted to cherry pick those parts of EU membership they wished to retain without, of course, accepting the fundamental principle of free movement. The EU side found this unacceptable and would not agree to any deal that undermined the integrity of the single market.  The EU negotiating team became highly frustrated that the UK side were unwilling or unable, due to political divisions in the Conservative party, to say clearly what they wanted. It seemed to Barnier that they came to Brussels and “tried it on”, asking for what they thought they could get away with. Also, the UK side failed to fully acknowledge that those who leave a club and stop paying for the privilege cannot expect to receive benefits as good as those who remain club members. I am told by a source in Brussels that even the civil servants supporting both sides struggled to speak the same language. It was suggested to me that this was primarily because the public school educated civil servants from the UK were quite charming but “do not say what they mean and do not mean what they say”. To elaborate on this cultural difference, political debate in the UK and Donald Trump's US is now saturated with spin. This can be found in European politics too but to a much less extent. Based upon my experience of living and working in Finland and having contact with policymakers in Brussels, I would say European politicians tend to be more predictable and quite straightforward.  During the negotiations the EU were understandably resistant to a deal that could be interpreted and spun in different ways by UK politicians back home. They saw that as a recipe for problems further down the road, especially as the terms of any trade deal was still to be worked out.   May's current dilemma With the clock ticking towards 29 March and with the “no deal” option still firmly on the table, there are those in May's government who are still hoping that EU ministers will blink, come to their rescue, re-open negotiations and drop the Northern Ireland backstop. I think this is highly unlikely as they have spent over two years of difficult negotiations to arrive at the present compromise deal. When Barnier says that “we stand by the agreement we have negotiated and... the Irish backstop is part and parcel of the deal”, he means this. He has strong support from President Macron, Angela Merkel and other EU leaders. The best May can hope for is the EU will issue a further 'statement of reassurance and good intent'. This will simply say 'subject to agreeing an acceptable trade deal, we anticipate the Irish backstop to be a temporary arrangement'. If this scenario proves to be accurate, then May will clearly try again to get her deal through parliament, claiming that the 'extra reassurances' make it the best and only deal in town. The vote before the end of February is likely to be a little closer and less humiliating than last time but I predict will be rejected. We will then be back to considering and voting on the various amendments, with a delay to leaving on 29 March (Yvette Cooper's amendment) likely to be seen as more acceptable and sensible, commanding greater support than either a 'no deal' or second referendum (my own preferred choice). A formal request for a delay until, say, Christmas would be a face-saving move and give everyone more time to try and find a way forward. It would, of course, not please everyone, especially the arch Brexiteers on the Tory backbenches who would claim 'it fails to carry out the will of the people' and is a ploy by remainers to thwart Brexit. However, a delay would almost certainly be acceptable to the EU. Implications for social work and social care       It is ironic that much of what I wrote in my PSW article on the Referendum back in June 2016 about the uncertainties facing social work still apply. It is just that, after the shambles of the past two-and-a-half years, we are now much more aware of the problems associated with leaving. It is worth setting out some of the implications again.  We are well aware of the economic benefits associated with the single market with some global firms saying they intend to transfer their head office to Europe. However, the EU promotes important social values too, in particular, a commitment to equality, fairness and social justice. This accords well with the ethical principles of social work as set out in our mission statement and the International Federation of Social Work's (IFSW) core values. The IFSW charter sets this out and thus challenging discrimination and inequality is a justified part of our everyday practice as injustice is embedded in many social problems. Currently, disadvantaged areas in the UK like Cornwall receive 166 million Euros from the special European Social Fund for projects to tackle poverty and so far the government has only made bland assurances about continuing this funding.   In general terms the EU provides a broader legislative and policy context for all social work practice which it is hoped the UK government will adopt. Worryingly this has not been done yet. The EU influence on agency policy can be found through primary legislation in treaties (now agreed by qualified majority voting); secondary legislation though regulations and directives (the 48 hour Working Time Directive which our government allowed workers to opt out of); policy briefings and guidance; research reports and an enormous amount of annual statistical data. EU statistical data provides a useful source of data for comparative social policy research and publications such as EUROSTAT enable us to compare policy and practice outcomes, social expenditure and different approaches across all the member states. In the past this has acted as an incentive for the UK to look beyond our own borders at how other countries tackle similar social problems - child protection systems in Sweden, multi-disciplinary care of older people in the Netherlands and integrated mental health care the Nordic way in Finland. There is a danger that without EUROSTAT data forcing us to widen our horizons, Brexit could lead to a more insular approach. This must be avoided. EU membership has facilitated social work practice in a number of discreet ways. For example, many urban councils have recruited social workers from EU countries to fill vacancies; European exchange networks where good practice lessons are shared; links with organisations like UNICEF whose funds support work with asylum seekers and refugees; important university exchange programs such as ERASMUS which enable social work students to spend a term in a European university. It is unclear post-Brexit which of these programs will continue and whether government funding will be maintained. Vice chancellors from Russell Group universities have recently written a joint letter to the government asking for a commitment to continue research funding on a number of EU projects. There is clearly a lot at stake here. Access to a range of health and welfare benefits for EU citizens will clearly be affected as these are linked to free movement rights. At present we are told the Government is renegotiating bilateral agreements with the EU on social security, pensions and access to health care. This would not only effect migrants in the UK but the estimated 1.5 million British people currently living in Europe who do not have unrestricted access to benefits in other member states. I myself will be affected by this in Finland and it is one of the many reasons I support a second referendum. However, it remains to be seen what scheme is set up to replace the European Health Insurance Card.  In the words of Charles Aznavour... Brexit has raised issues that underlie the principles of democracy which transcend national borders and might only be achievable within a more harmonious and integrated political community. This explains why countries like Germany and France want closer political union, something the UK has always resisted since Margaret Thatcher went to Bruges and warned against the EU becoming a centralised socialist club. The alternative to a more integrated EU, with decisions formulated in Brussels, is for greater self-reliance and independence in Westminster. The reality of this is that while transparency and accountability may be at times lacking, post-Brexit blaming Brussels will no longer be an option. An uncomfortable truth for the Brexiteers. The question is how to make the EU and UK government in Westminster more open, responsive and democratic institutions committed to promoting justice and equality alongside their economic goals. This is the only way that disadvantage, discrimination and inequality throughout Europe, highlighted by the current migration crisis, will be tackled. It requires our political leaders to forego national self-interest and show moral integrity and a wider social vision for the common good. If we bale out of the EU on 29 March with some Ersatz deal or 'no deal' I will turn on my CD player and listen to Charles Aznavour singing, Yesterday when I was young... Dr Paul Stepney is Adjunct Professor of Social Work at the University of Tampere in Finland This article is published by Professional Social work magazine which provides a platform for a range of perspectives across the social work sector. It does not necessarily reflect the views of the British Association of Social Workers
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A Concert for Caring

A Concert for Caring | Social services news | Scoop.it
Following a successful concert to celebrate caring in 2014, the Health and Social Care Alliance Scotland (the ALLIANCE) are pleased to announce that they are hosting a second Concert for Caring in partnership with Regular Music (this link will take you away from our website).
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Scottish councils urged to speed up health and social care integration

Scottish councils urged to speed up health and social care integration | Social services news | Scoop.it
A new report sets out a number of proposals designed to ensure progress on integration continues.
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Building Collaboration Fund

Building Collaboration Fund | Social services news | Scoop.it
CCPS is working in partnership with Scottish Government to support the development of collaborations in the social care sector through the Building Collaboration Fund. The £100,000 fund recognises the huge promise of organisations working together to improve their offer to the people they collectively support. Funding of between £5000 and £25,000 is available for up to 6 collaborations during 19/20 to provide practical support for progressing the collaboration. Successful applicants will also participate in a structured peer learning programme which will provide additional support for overcoming some of the barriers to successful collaboration. The knowledge and learning gained from these sessions will help inform future collaborations in the social care sector. If you’re interested in applying please refer to the below guidelines and submit the application form by 5pm on Monday the 18th March. Please contact Emma if you’d like to discuss your idea or if you have any queries.
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Scottish Government to scrap jail sentences of less than 12 months - The Scotsman

Scottish Government to scrap jail sentences of less than 12 months - The Scotsman | Social services news | Scoop.it
Attempts are being made to reduce Scotland’s prison population by introducing a presumption against sentences of less than a year.
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Research in Practice for Adults | What is it about the care system that correlates with criminality?

Research in Practice for Adults | What is it about the care system that correlates with criminality? | Social services news | Scoop.it
Oli Preston ‘I came into a system that couldn't hug me when I needed a hug the most. And then, years later, I’m the one diagnosed with an attachment disorder?’ These are hard-hitting words from Lemm Sissay, addressing over 200 leaders and practitioners from across Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS). Lemm is Chancellor of the University of Manchester, author, playwright and poet. He is also a ‘care leaver’. But as Lemm puts it, he didn’t leave care. Care left him. In his own words, Lemm was ‘built for prison’ by the care system. Taught not that he should aspire to great things, but that he should learn how to sign onto the dole so that he could make ends meet when he turned 18. You get the sense that the strengths evident from his public speaking – his quick tongue, his vivid imagination, his inability to stay still, his racing mind – that these traits could have been the exact thing that made his experience in care so difficult. Although he didn’t end up in prison, as a care leaver, Lemm Sissay is from a population of people who are much more likely to become mixed up with the criminal justice system. Although this fact has until recently been overlooked, there has been a new focus on better supporting care leavers and reversing the trend. This particular speech was made at the second HMPPS annual Care Leavers Conference, hosted by Teresa Clarke, the service’s ‘Care Leavers Champion’. In the last few years, the criminal justice system in England has started to respond to the mounting evidence that the care experiences of prisoners require a great deal more attention. To see why you don’t have to look much further than the headline statistics: In 2016-2017, there were over 70,000 young people in some form of care in England alone. This includes foster care, residential homes, secure homes, or short term placements. The majority of these young people (approximately 60%) were in this situation to protect them from abuse or neglect. Only two percent of the care population were being parented by the state because of their own ‘socially unacceptable’ or ‘criminal’ behaviours (Department for Education, 2017). The number of 18-21 year olds who are defined as care leavers in the same reporting year was approximately 27,000. Overall, care leavers (aged 16-18) make up less than 1% of the under 18 population – 62 children for every 10,000 in England. However in English and Welsh prisons, estimates suggest that over 25% of young offenders and more than 50% of the people in secure children’s centres have been in care (Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons, 2011; Redmond, 2015). This is not exclusive to a single area of the criminal justice system either. In both male and female, youth offender and adult facilities, you are more likely to meet a care experienced person than you would out on the street (Farmer, 2017). What is it about the care system that correlates with criminality? And what is the nature of this relationship? My instinct as a researcher and evaluator is not to jump to conclusions, but to ask more questions. It would be easy to blame the system and say that the experiences someone has in care make them more likely to offend, but this perspective overlooks the many hard working foster carers, social workers and other professionals who fight every day to improve the lives of the young people they work with. Also, we shouldn’t overlook ‘confounding’ factors – things such as family and personal poverty, which might explain both the likelihood of being in care and of being imprisoned. Indeed, a review of evidence by the Care Leavers Association highlighted the links between poverty, the absence of familial support, and care leaver involvement in the criminal justice system (Graham, 2015); and a report by the Howard League for Penal Reform (Fitzpatrick, 2014) showed the large systemic gaps in support for people with care experience when leaving prison. The House of Commons Justice Committee (2013: 47) also identified this gap, citing the 'devastating implications' following release due to ‘the effective abandonment of looked after children and care leavers in custody by children’s and social services’ (House of Commons Justice Committee, 2013). However, saying that this is simply ‘a money problem’ risks overlooking deeper systemic and societal issues. It might also lead people to believe that increasing payments for care leavers would solve the problem. But what kind of parent, corporate or not, would bring their child up in a system where they are taught that the appropriate replacement for loving family support is a slight increment in their Universal Credit entitlement? Without further epidemiological research, it’s hard to know the exact relationships between poverty, care and prison – and the likely answer is that this relationship is complex and very much depends on the specific context of the young person. However, many studies suggest that a key factor in preventing offending and reoffending is a supportive family or social support structure, something which people who have been in the care system are less likely to have around them, both before and after they’ve been in prison (Fitzpatrick & Williams, 2017). This lack of a stable family life, whether this family is biologically related or not, might explain a number of key factors that relate to criminological outcomes, and it has been shown that attachment to family is a significant factor in the prevention of reoffending (Brunton-Smith & McCarthy, 2016). For instance, family might help with money and accommodation, overcoming substance addiction (Broome, Knight, Knight, Hiller, & Simpson, 1997), and provide emotional support throughout early adulthood. Family might also offer support, advice and guidance around employment. Indeed, of the 27,000 care leavers in 2016-2017, 40% were not in education, training or employment, compared to 13% of the wider population (Department for Education, 2017). In his recent review, Lord Farmer highlighted the absence of ‘key protective factors’ for care leavers, such as living with family after release and maintaining contact with family members or significant others during a sentence (Brunton-Smith & Hopkins, 2013; Farmer, 2017). Indeed, Ministry of Justice research found that rates of reoffending were 39% lower for prisoners who received regular visits from partners or family (Ministry of Justice, 2016); however these are clearly factors that may be more complex for people who have been in care. The evidence therefore suggests that the focus should be on helping young people to develop stable systems and relationships which can provide the type of familial support that might otherwise be unavailable to people who have previously been in care. What would this support look like practically and why isn’t it already happening? In his 2016 report, Lord Laming highlighted several areas for services to improve the quality of support for care leavers to reduce re-entry into the criminal justice system, including increased support during custody, better and targeted rehabilitation for young people who have experienced care, and improved multi-agency working between social care and criminal justice services (The Prison Reform Trust, 2017). The Farmer review (2017) made recommendations that familial and other significant relationships could be better developed for care leavers before they leave prison. Furthermore, the review highlights the central role of staff (specifically, prison officers) in understanding care leavers’ circumstances and how to recognise the potentially sparse external support system they may have. Furthermore, there could be efforts to increase the use of entitlements that already exist. Care leaver legislation and policy stipulates that young people who have spent a significant period of care in their lives (13 weeks or more) have a number of entitlements, including regular contact with a Personal Advisor (PA), a pathway plan which should be reviewed every six months, and financial support for things like accommodation, education and training. But these entitlements may not be accessed by all care leavers, and in prison the practicalities of accessing this support become even more difficult. Prisons might be located away from the local authority the care leaver is from, PAs might not be able to visit within visitation hours, and pathway plans might not be relevant to the terms of sentence and probation. In all, the realities of incarceration make support challenging. However, there are already examples of services within prisons and local authorities which are addressing these needs. In HMP Drake Hall, a service led by an inmate and care leaver is improving the identification of other inmates who have experienced care, providing a regular support forum for care leavers, and assisting them with access to their entitlements, including regular visits with PAs and financial support for training. In HMP Brinsford and HMP Portland, Barnardo’s are undertaking a programme of training for prison and local authority staff, focusing on appropriate support for care leavers. Their Care Leaver Engagement Workers will also be offering one-to-one support for care leavers, help with the development of positive relationships, and peer support groups. In Salford and HMP Forest Bank, the local authority care leaver service and local probation service have developed a multi-agency approach, including a shared protocol and joined-up pathway plans and probation plans for care leavers. And in the North East of England, the charity NEPACS are co-producing support with care leavers in HMP Deerbolt and HMP Low Newton to develop training resources and improve resettlement and resilience of care leavers. Adequately supporting young people and young adults who are already in prison is only part of the solution. To really address the overrepresentation of care leavers in prison we require a more appropriate response to both the individual challenges that children in care face and the systemic issues which might be responsible for their criminalisation in the first place. The recommendations in the Prison Reform Trust review (2017) have a particular focus on how the local authority, as the recognised parent of children in care, should be providing the kinds of support that are typically provided by families and are crucial to preventing young people from becoming involved in the criminal justice system in the first place. This includes reducing unnecessary involvement with police and criminal systems for arbitrary or non-serious acts; and improving the consistency in the way the Home Office deals with young people in care. This feels like a particularly powerful recommendation given the context of ‘corporate parenting’. Specifically, if a child from a stable family was to be punished by their parent – perhaps to be grounded, or to lose their allowance for a month – this might have some implications on family relationships, but then it would be over. Just a memory of ‘that time when you did that thing’. But punishment by a corporate parent might involve the inclusion of other services, social workers, even the police. And these services have statutory obligations to collect detailed records. Records that stay with young people throughout their childhood and often their lives. As Scott King, a care leaver and trainer in providing support to care experienced people put it back at the HMPPS conference: ‘We should stop punishing care leavers. Most of these people have been punished enough – their parents and foster carers have all given them that message, and the system’s response to their reaction is to punish them further. But the things they’ve achieved despite the challenges they’ve faced is amazing. These strengths should be appreciated and acknowledged.’ There is no one-size-fits-all approach to supporting young people who’ve been in care, and making a change to their overrepresentation in the criminal justice system will not be an easy task; however, the work of many individuals and the commitment of several organisations is starting to make a difference. And there are easy ways in which other organisations and care providers can join this movement too. As the evidence mentioned here suggests, any work which strengthens relationships for young people in care and care leavers would be a step in the right direction. Services should focus on ensuring care leavers are fully accessing the support they are entitled to, but more importantly, that leaving care is not the end of care. All young people should have a family group – whether they are relatives, non-relatives, friends, work colleagues, class mates, PAs, or other professionals – well into their adult lives. Furthermore, developing and nurturing this support structure and planning for a family beyond care should be the focus of services and corporate parents long before a young person begins the transition into adulthood. About the author Oli Preston is the Head of Evaluation at Research in Practice and Research in Practice for Adults. Related Research in Practice for Adults resources Transitional safeguarding – adolescence to adulthood: Strategic Briefing Transitions – supporting young people in transition to reach positive outcomes in adulthood: Webinar References Broome, K. M., Knight, D. K., Knight, K., Hiller, M. L., & Simpson, D. D. (1997). Peer, family, and motivational influences on drug treatment process and recidivism for probationers. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 53(4), 387–397. Available online: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9169394 Brunton-Smith, I., & Hopkins, K. (2013). The factors associated with proven re-offending following release from prison: findings from Waves 1 to 3 of SPCR. Available online: https://bit.ly/2teS3fz Brunton-Smith, I., & McCarthy, D. J. (2016). The Effects of Prisoner Attachment to Family on Re-entry Outcomes: A Longitudinal Assessment. British Journal of Criminology, 57(2), azv129. Available online: https://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azv129 Department for Education. (2017). Children looked after in England (including adoption), year ending 31 March 2017. Available online: https://bit.ly/2USMQ8R Farmer, Lord. (2017). The Importance of Strengthening Prisoners’ Family Ties to Prevent Reoffending and Reduce Intergenerational Crime Final Report from The Farmer Review. Available online: https://bit.ly/2wbo4Go Fitzpatrick, C. (2014). Achieving justice for children in care and care-leavers. Available online: https://howardleague.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/HLWP_14_2014.pdf Fitzpatrick, C., & Williams, P. (2017). The neglected needs of care leavers in the criminal justice system: Practitioners’ perspectives and the persistence of problem (corporate) parenting. Criminology & Criminal Justice, 17(2), 175–191. Available online: https://doi.org/10.1177/1748895816659324 Graham, D. (2015). Anti-poverty strategies for care leavers: the same as prisoners? Available online: https://www.crimeandjustice.org.uk/publications/cjm/article/anti-poverty-strategies-care-leavers-same-prisoners Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons. (2011). The care of looked after children in custody: A short thematic review. Available online: https://www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmiprisons/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/2014/08/Looked-after-children-print.pdf House of Commons Justice Committee. (2013). Youth justice. House of Commons, UK. Available online: https://bit.ly/2Gl4uyO Ministry of Justice. (2016). Prison Safety and Reform. Available online: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/prison-safety-and-reform Redmond, A. (2015). Children in Custody 2014–15 An analysis of 12–18-year-olds’ perceptions of their experience in secure training centres and young offender institutions. London. Available online: https://www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmiprisons/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/2015/12/HMIP_CP_-Children-in-custody-2014-15-FINAL-web-AW.pdf The Prison Reform Trust. (2017). In Care, Out of Trouble: How the life chances of children in care can be transformed by protecting them from unnecessary involvement in the criminal justice system: An independent review chaired by Lord Laming. Available online: http://www.prisonreformtrust.org.uk/WhatWeDo/ProjectsResearch/CareReview
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Care experienced young people | Aberdeen City Council

Care experienced young people | Aberdeen City Council | Social services news | Scoop.it
There are an increasing number of opportunities for care experienced young people in Aberdeen to share their voice and lived experience to make care experience better. The ACE (Aberdeen Care Experienced) Group is one way that care experienced young people are empowered to participate, influence...
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National Social Services Search

National Social Services Search | Social services news | Scoop.it
Do you want to be able to find work-related information quickly and easily? If so, you’ll be interested in this latest development by Iriss. In partnership with a number of organisations, they’re testing out a new national search service.
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The Guardian view on funding social care: break the tax taboo | Editorial | Opinion | The Guardian

The Guardian view on funding social care: break the tax taboo | Editorial | Opinion | The Guardian | Social services news | Scoop.it
Editorial: Fear of levelling with the public about the real choices leads to political inaction and costs lives...
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TEC programme data review and evaluation: summary report - gov.scot

TEC programme data review and evaluation: summary report - gov.scot | Social services news | Scoop.it
Report presenting findings from the Scottish Government Technology Enabled Care (TEC) programme data review and evaluation option study.
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Effective Communication within Health & Social Care - 4th March 2019 •

Effective Communication within Health & Social Care - 4th March 2019 • | Social services news | Scoop.it
Improving the quality of communication is a key priority for health and social care staff. Staff who, at all levels, are expected to work in partnership both with service users and with other external agencies.
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Creating hope: How pioneering Dundee project Foolish Optimism is 'puncturing the silence' of mental health

Creating hope: How pioneering Dundee project Foolish Optimism is 'puncturing the silence' of mental health | Social services news | Scoop.it
Michael Alexander meets members of pioneering Dundee project Foolish Optimism who have been engaged in a national conversation about the ‘scourge’ of mental health amongst young people – and now want to ‘puncture the silence’ further.
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Scottish Government slammed over support given to dementia sufferers

Scottish Government slammed over support given to dementia sufferers | Social services news | Scoop.it
The Scottish Government's failure to deliver on a promise of support for people who are diagnosed with dementia has been described as…...
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Nearly 65% of prisoners at women's jail 'show signs of brain injury' | Society | The Guardian

Nearly 65% of prisoners at women's jail 'show signs of brain injury' | Society | The Guardian | Social services news | Scoop.it
Call for screening as women tell study their injuries were caused by domestic violence...
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'It's like the light's come back on': connecting care service users with their communities | Society | The Guardian

'It's like the light's come back on': connecting care service users with their communities | Society | The Guardian | Social services news | Scoop.it
A new project tackles social isolation by building links between older and learning-disabled people and their neighbourhoods...
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Social care integration "progressing well"

Social care integration "progressing well" | Social services news | Scoop.it
The only third sector news outlet in Scotland dedicated to sharing news from charities and voluntary organisations.
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ALLIANCE Annual Conference early bird registration open

ALLIANCE Annual Conference early bird registration open | Social services news | Scoop.it
Registration is now open for the ALLIANCE Annual Conference, Impact: The 3rd Health and Social Care Integration Event which will take place on Monday 20 May 2019 in Glasgow. All delegates who register before Friday 22 February will be offered a 20% off discount.
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