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What do you understand by the term blended learning? (a poll)

What do you understand by the term blended learning? (a poll) | Social services news | Scoop.it
I’m hearing the term “blended learning” used to mean a number of different things nowadays? Which is closest to your own definition – or do you have another to share? Loading…
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Resilience: The Biology of Stress and the Science of Hope - Screening

Resilience: The Biology of Stress and the Science of Hope - Screening | Social services news | Scoop.it
The Health and Social Care Alliance Scotland, the Health and Social Care Academy, NSPCC and Govan Housing Association would like to invite you to a screening of ‘Resilience: The Biology of Stress and the Science of Hope’.
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Separated in care: 'I needed to protect my brother'

Separated in care: 'I needed to protect my brother' | Social services news | Scoop.it
Ryan McShane was separated from his brother for weeks at a time while they were in care as children.
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Care services shouldn’t rely on volunteers’ goodwill. It morphs into self-righteousness | Stewart Dakers | Society | The Guardian

Care services shouldn’t rely on volunteers’ goodwill. It morphs into self-righteousness | Stewart Dakers | Society | The Guardian | Social services news | Scoop.it
All of us commit unconditionally at first, but then resentment sets in.Care needs to be delivered by paid professionals, says 80-year-old community worker Stewart Dakers...
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Malcolm Wright appointed as new NHS Scotland chief executive

Malcolm Wright appointed as new NHS Scotland chief executive | Social services news | Scoop.it
NHS Scotland has appointed a new chief executive.
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Self Management Awards – 5 reasons to submit an award!

Self Management Awards – 5 reasons to submit an award! | Social services news | Scoop.it
The Self Management Awards recognise innovative and interesting self management activity happening across Scotland,  read on to find out why you should take five minutes out of your day and submit a nomination.
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ALLIANCE Live: Children and Young People

ALLIANCE Live: Children and Young People | Social services news | Scoop.it
ALLIANCE Live will deliver a range of outputs including regular webinars that present the innovative work within health and social care, recording podcasts with panelists who have both professional and lived experience of integrated working.
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Future of Care at Home —

Future of Care at Home — | Social services news | Scoop.it
A CREATIVE FUTURE FOR CARE AT HOME   BACKGROUND 'A creative future for care at home' involved a collaboration with Scottish Care to explore and co-create a series of possible scenarios for care at home in Scotland based on trends from the present. We supported care providers and frontline staff to creatively explore a future vision for care at home using a future-oriented design approach. Our design methods offered a way to integrate perspectives across the sector, transform challenges into areas of opportunity based on current trends and make tangible the way in which care at home could change in the future. Our approach and outcomes aim to build capacity in the sector and enable Scottish Care to continue this conversation by engaging a wider audience to collectively shape and progress a preferable vision for care at home in Scotland. The challenges facing the care at home sector are well-known and increasing. There is a need for more funding, more recognition for care staff, and for a shift towards a preventative, relationship-based and personalised model of care that will support people to live independently for longer and lead to better outcomes for those being supported. Work to date has focussed on identifying the challenges and underlying principles that will enable this shift, however what is missing from these discussions is a creative and dynamic approach towards communicating and illustrating a vision for care at home in a more tangible way and to involve key stakeholders, care at home providers and frontline staff, in the process of re-imagining a better future. PROJECT AIM To creatively explore and prototype a future of care at home that is underpinned by the National Health and Social Care Standards and engages a dynamically different sector. METHODOLOGY 'HERE AND NOW' Our research process began with an exploration of the “Here and Now” of care at home in order to gain a contextual understanding of the current challenges, aspirations and areas of opportunity. The first phase involved a period of desk research building on existing work led by Scottish Care and reviewing wider literature on models of care and support at home. In addition, a member of the research team undertook observation and shadowing with care at home service in order to gain a more immersive understanding of the context. Finally, we employed a pop-up engagement (Teal and French, 2016) at the “Design, Technology and Dementia" conference at the University of Stirling to include the voice of academics and other practitioners involved in the wider research landscape of care. The findings of the contextual research phase were presented back to Scottish Care as part of a “sense checking” workshop to share the understanding of the context and identify areas of priority to be addressed through the current project. The insights that emerged from this activity highlighted that both the current challenges and solutions for the immediate future of care at home are actually quite clear.  The outcomes from the sense checking workshop shaped the direction of the project to explore what the future of care at home will look and feel like in 25 years. Exploring this future included developing an understanding of what objects, technologies, and ideas will be important, and which actors will make up care at home in the future. In 25 years, ways of living will be different. People will have different views and life experiences, and will have grown up in different technological, economic and social climates, with different family structures, friendships, and relationships. People will hold different opinions on what it means to 'live well'. These differences are very important to consider when exploring the future of care at home.  'THERE AND THEN' To explore these questions and speculate about possible new roles for care at home and the wider landscape, we applied a future-oriented design approach, in which creative and visual methods were used during participatory design workshops with frontline carers and care providers. In both workshops, participants were invited to share their current experiences of providing care at home and were supported to imagine future scenarios of care at home using a series of design tools. During workshop 1 (care organisers), participants worked in small groups using future trend cards to build a future scenario of care as a response to some of the current challenges shared. Using materials and playful objects, participants considered the people and organisations involved in the scenario, their role and impact on areas of opportunity. As a group, participants discussed characteristics of future job roles for care at home captured as personas to identify the needs, actions, skills and      objects involved.  Rapid synthesis of the insights emerging from workshop 1, informed the development of three speculative design ideas to address the challenges experienced in providing care at home. The design speculations included: '#care@home', exploring sharing good stories of care through social media to tackle stigma and public perceptions; 'Life skills academy', to nurture caring mindsets among children and young people by involving them in care at home; and 'Agent Care', exploring the role of technology in supporting care staff to allow more time to focus on relationship-based care. In workshop 2 (frontline staff), participants were invited to select an image card which was meaningful to them and supported them to share an experience from their work. Participants were then asked to select a future trend card and were asked to reflect on how this future trend would impact the experience they had shared. Participants were introduced to the design speculations and invited to share their reflections on how these ideas may impact their role and care at home.  FINDINGS EMERGING AND UNDERPINNING THEMES A set of themes emerged from the analysis of the insights generated across each of the methods and activities employed. The themes were translated into principles which underpin and inform the direction and progression towards the future of care at home and were used as a basis to develop a speculative collection of personas to depict future care at home roles. DESIGNING THE CARE AT HOME WORKFORCE OF THE FUTURE A key outcome of the research was the development of a speculative care at home team to represents future scenarios of multidisciplinary working and give form to the types of roles that may exist for care at home in the future. The development of a collection of personas aimed to support further engagement and stimulate debate and conversation with the wider care at home sector around the purpose, key activities and skills and training specific to each future role.  The speculative multidisciplinary care at home team includes a: CARE CONNECTOR Specialising in facilitating meaningful relationships - both physical and digital - for people receiving care at home and supports clients to work towards their aspirations and goals. CARE NAVIGATOR Specialising in coordinating the multidisciplinary care team through gathering, making sense of and organising different flows of data in order to provide responsive, personalised and relationship-based care at home. CARE TECHNOLOGIST Specialising in facilitating the interactions between assistive technology, people receiving care, and the wider care team in order to provide meaningful and personalised support. The personas make these roles tangible by including a biography, aspiration and career highlights descriptions, as well as visualising an ‘image’ of care at home through the uniforms and way of working presented. The personas respond to the emerging themes and insights shared by care at home staff during the design-led workshops. The personas are not designed to be concrete examples but provide a vision that can be used as a tool to support further engagement and exploration of the future care at home workforce. FEEDBACK ON THE FUTURE CARE AT HOME WORKFORCE Pop-up engagement was used to gather feedback on the speculative care at home roles from students and members of the public. The reaction to the future staff roles was very positive. Many pointed out that when they think about technological advances, they usually think about their negative aspects. For example the risk that technology might replace people in the emotional and relational aspect of care. The future roles we presented made people think of technology in a different way and they had a very positive response towards envisioning future technology as a tool that is able to free up space for carers to have more qualitative time to spend with people receiving care. It was interesting to notice how for many it was a new thought to imagine a future in which technology plays this role. TOOLS TO EXPLORE CARE AT HOME FUTURES As part of our exploration we have considered the objects, technologies and ideas that will impact the sector in the future in order to co-create a series of possible scenarios for care at home based on trends from the present. A design-led set of activities were created as an outcome of the research that aim to support continued exploration of the future of care at home. The activities invite people to imagine what might be possible, given what we know today.   Continuing the use of symbolic imagery of tarot reading, which informed the aesthetic of the project and engaged imaginations throughout, the toolbox contains a deck of future trend cards (adapted from Sitra), ʻWhat Ifʼ cards and ʻFuture Staffʼ cards designed bespoke for this project as a result of emerging insights from participants. Three ʻTarot Boardsʼ offer a guide of different ways to use the sets of cards to imagine future visions of care at home and offer the opportunity for supported exploration to allow transformative ideas to emerge. The ʻTarot boardsʼ support people to be actively involved in imagining and shaping the future of care at home by exploring some radical possibilities of tomorrow, for example the use of A.I in the social care sector and other societal and cultural shifts captured in the future trend cards, and by engaging in ʻWhat Ifʼ questions on possible scenarios for care at home. The ʻFuture Staffʼ cards present three different future roles for the care at home workforce and invite participants to imagine how these future roles might interact in a fictional scenario and stimulate conversations and ideas for preferable future roles and ways of working. The designed activities will support Scottish Care to creatively engage a wider audience through exploring how care at home as a sector might prepare for future possibilities and for future users by offering a way to critically engage with the “not yet”, considering opportunities and challenges, and opening up new questions and debate on future directions to shape the future we want. Through this collection of tools and activities we give form to the future of care at home and make this tangible for Scottish Care and others to consider how the sector might prepare for future possibilities and continue this creative exploration of care at home, allowing transformative ideas to emerge.  RECOMMENDATIONS A series of ʻwhat nextʼ suggestions and recommendations were developed to bring together research and speculation as evidenced and actionable design recommendations. The recommendations offer ideas for what can be achieved in the short (now), medium (near future) and long term (far future) and are intended to support further conversation and action around how the outcomes from the project can be taken forward. Recommendations include: sharing good stories of care, forecasting care at home needs, matchmaking available technology with current needs, exploring and developing the future care at home workforce and exploring new collaborations. The recommendations suggest next steps to build on the emerging ideas but also indicate where ideas are aligned to, and could support, national workforce planning.  DOWNLOAD PROJECT MATERIAL Challenges Summary What If Scenarios Emerging Themes Tarot Image Cards Tarot Trend Cards Tarot Boards Tarot Staff Cards Future Staff Posters Feedback Summary Recommendations LEAVE FEEDBACK OR SHARE YOUR COMMENTS AND IDEAS Name Email Address Feedback, comments or ideas * FURTHER INFORMATION For further information please contact: Dr Tara French | t.french@gsa.ac.uk Ute Schauberger | u.schauberger@gsa.ac.uk Daniela Quacinella
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Self-directed Support Strategy 2010-2020: implementation plan 2019-2021 - gov.scot

Self-directed Support Strategy 2010-2020: implementation plan 2019-2021 - gov.scot | Social services news | Scoop.it
This implementation plan sets out the actions required to drive forward the changes necessary to fully implement self-directed support.
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Rights, Relationships & Recognition at Social Work Scotland

Rights, Relationships & Recognition at Social Work Scotland | Social services news | Scoop.it
The theme of this year's Social Work Scotland conference is Rights, Relationships and Recognition. We will be in attendance and look forward to meeting everyone there to discuss.
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Social prescribing: why doctors are sending patients to dance classes, art therapy and gardening to improve their health – Brinkwire

Over 1,000 trained social prescribing link workers will be in place by the end of 2020/21 rising further by 2023/24, the plan states. Scotland already has many such staff in place, liaising between GP and patient to help find the right course for each person, and officials say over 8,000 people will co-create at least one social prescription for themselves over the next two years. John Cassidy, chair of Scottish Communities for Health and Wellbeing, said: “It is important to think of social prescribing as more than simply a process of referral or as a method of signposting individuals to community provision. It involves building relationships, taking a holistic approach and engaging individuals at the heart of the process.” Doctors and health officials want to reduce reliance on medication – especially as around half of GP appointments are not directly related to medical conditions, according to the NHS. Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard, Chair of the Royal College of GPs, told: “Instead of medication, patients might benefit from going to an exercise class, art workshop, or local event where they can meet like-minded people, and we have heard stories of patients who have been able to dramatically improve their health through recommendations to try non-medical interventions. “Social prescribing is nothing new, it is something that good GPs have always done – it just hasn’t had a proper name until recently. It can help patients improve their lifestyle, their overall wellbeing, or simply give them a sense of purpose – something that drug treatments often cannot do.” More resources Professor Stokes-Lampard said that must be “sufficient resources” in place to go alongside the greater use of social prescribing. “We also need to see the other pledges made in the Long Term Plan, including more resources for general practice and a workforce capable of dealing with increasing demand, to ensure we can keep personalised care at the heart of general practice, both now and in the future,” she said. A handful of social prescribers already work in health trusts, earning up to £25,000 a year. They do not need medical qualifications but should have experience at a charity or local council. Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock has said: “For too long we’ve been fostering a culture that’s popping pills and Prozac . . . Arts and social activities can help us move to more person centred care and increase focus on prevention. I see social prescribing growing in importance, becoming an indispensable tool for GPs, just like a thermometer or a stethoscope may be seen today. ”Personalised care is the future and there’s growing evidence that supporting people to access community services and activities, such as chess clubs or dance classes, has the power to improve health and wellbeing.”
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Carer awareness week: The hidden lives of young carers

Carer awareness week: The hidden lives of young carers | Social services news | Scoop.it
Like many young carers, I can’t tell you the exact moment my mum got sick. Nor can I pinpoint the moment I started helping her and my family get through day-to-day life. But there was a moment, 10 years ago, when my mother went from healthy to bed bound.
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Worker struck off for abusive treatment at Beechwood Care Home

Worker struck off for abusive treatment at Beechwood Care Home | Social services news | Scoop.it
An abusive care home worker employed in Glasgow, who dragged an elderly woman by the wrist and the armpit has been struck off.
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Carers Week 2019  – SSSC News

Carers Week 2019  – SSSC News | Social services news | Scoop.it
This week, 10-16 June, is carer awareness week across the UK. There are at least 759,000 carers aged 16 and over, and 29,000 young carers in Scotland. The value of care provided is equal to the cost of the whole of the NHS. For many, caring is hugely rewarding but carers can often find it challenging to look after their own wellbeing, or juggle work commitments or education, alongside their caring responsibilities. SSSC Chief Executive, Lorraine Gray said: ‘Carers Week gives us all the chance to raise awareness of caring, as well as highlight and recognise the contribution carers make. Here at the SSSC, we recognise the role the social service workforce has working in partnership with carers and we also know that many of these workers are carers themselves. This is a great opportunity to help carers get the right help and support.’ Throughout the week we will share resources for you to use to support carers in your work. carersyoung carers
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From Franco's 'stolen babies' to Nazi Germany, social services have a dark past – it's time for a global reckoning

From Franco's 'stolen babies' to Nazi Germany, social services have a dark past – it's time for a global reckoning | Social services news | Scoop.it
Why social work needs a global truth and reconciliation commission.
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11 of the Best Books For Teaching and Learning About Refugees

11 of the Best Books For Teaching and Learning About Refugees | Social services news | Scoop.it
<p><strong>While the press coverage may not be as absorbed by migrants, asylum seekers and refugees as they were a few years ago, that by no means implies that all is…</strong></p> | Teachwire News...
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Devastating report reveals crisis in Scotland's care sector

Devastating report reveals crisis in Scotland's care sector | Social services news | Scoop.it
SCOTLAND’S care sector is facing a looming crisis as soaring numbers of charities pull out of contracts due to council cutbacks, is threatening to…...
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26 June 2019 | Glasgow City Health and Social Care Partnership

26 June 2019 | Glasgow City Health and Social Care Partnership | Social services news | Scoop.it
26 June 2019 June 26 2019 Glasgow City Integration Joint Board Agenda 26-06-2019 June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Agenda Download PDF Item No 3 - Draft Minutes from IJB held on 08/05/2019 June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports Download PDF Item No 5 - Integration Joint Board Rolling Action List 26.06.2019 June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports Download PDF Item No 7 - Annual Governance Statement June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports To present to the Integration Joint Board the Annual Governance Statement for the Glasgow City Integration Joint Board for 2018/19. Download PDF Item No 8 - Outturn Report 2018/19 June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports To provide a high level overview of the Integration Joint Board’s draft outturn position for 2018/19, and to seek approval for the transfer of funds to reserves to allow completion of the Integration Joint Board’s accounts by the statutory deadline of 30 September 2019. Download PDF Item No 9 - Unaudited Annual Accounts June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports To present to the Integration Joint Board the Unaudited Annual Accounts for the year ended 31 March 2019. Download PDF Item No 10 - Update on Financial Allocations and Budget for 2019/20 June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports This report will provide an update on the budget approved by the IJB for 2019-20 including an update on Homecare and Housing First and the funding offer from NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. Download PDF Item No 11 - Re-design and Development of Youth Health Services June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports This paper summarises the business case for developing a Youth Health Service across the city and seeks approval to proceed. Download PDF Item No 12 - Implementing the Carers Scotland Act (2016) June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports The purpose of this paper is to update the IJB on the Adult and Young Carer Strategies consultation process, provide a summary of the responses to the consultation, outline how the issues raised will be addressed and to propose further spend in services to support carers. Download PDF Item No 13 - Annual Performance Report 2018-19 June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports To present and seek approval of the Annual Performance Report for the Health and Social Care Partnership for the year 2018/19. Download PDF Item No 15 - Self-Evaluation of Integration Arrangements 2019 June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports The purpose of this report is to update the Integration Joint Board on activity to carry out a self-evaluation of integration arrangements in Glasgow City and to develop an improvement Action Plan for the IJB based on the views of IJB members, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde and Glasgow City Council. Download PDF Item No 16 - Tender for a Specialist Care Home Service to Support People with Learning Disabilities Requiring Complex Care - Update June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports To update the Integration Joint Board on the activity undertaken since the previous IJB briefing in November 2018. Download PDF Item No 17 - Mental Health Strategy and Implementation June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports The purpose of the report is to advise the Integration Joint Board on the further development and implementation of the Mental Health Strategy across the City. Download PDF Item No 18 - Annual Risk Management Review 2018/2019 June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports The purpose of this report is to provide an annual summary to the Integration Joint Board on the risk management activity and risk registers maintained within the Glasgow City Health & Social Care Partnership during 2018/19. Download PDF Item No 20 - Alcohol and Drug Partnership: Drug Related Deaths - Street Drugs Summit June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports To advise the Integration Joint Board on the outcomes of the Alcohol and Drug Partnership’s ‘Drug Related Deaths: Street Drugs Summit’ held on 11th April 2019. Download PDF Item No 21 - Use of Shared Accommodation by Service Users June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports To provide information to the Integration Joint Board about the use of shared accommodation by service users in Glasgow and the process undertaken when supporting individual service users to access shared accommodation. Download PDF Item No 22 - Directions Annual Report 2019 June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports To provide a summary of the Directions issued by the Glasgow City Integration Joint Board (IJB) to Glasgow City Council and NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde in the period June 2018 to May 2019, and to suggest amendments to the Directions process to reflect learning since establishment of the IJB in February 2016. Download PDF Item No 23 - Glasgow City Integration Joint Board - Directions June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports To provide the Integration Joint Board with the summary of current directions. Download PDF Item No 25 - IJB Public Engagement Committee Draft Minute 29.05.2019 June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports Download PDF Item No 26 - Glasgow City Integration Joint Board - Future Agenda Items June 2019 | Glasgow City Integration Joint Board | Papers and Reports Download PDF
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CrossReach awarded for tackling social care recruitment challenges

CrossReach awarded for tackling social care recruitment challenges | Social services news | Scoop.it
The Church of Scotland’s Social Care Council, CrossReach, has been recognised for tackling recruitment challenges in the social care sector at the Scottish Social Services Awards.
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Named person policy 'contributed to confusion' in child harm cases

Named person policy 'contributed to confusion' in child harm cases | Social services news | Scoop.it
Confusion over the  ‘named person’ policy is undermining efforts to protect children from neglect, according to Scotland’s Care Watchdog.
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Vulnerable children ‘left to die by social work failures’ | Scotland | The Times

Vulnerable children ‘left to die by social work failures’ | Scotland | The Times | Social services news | Scoop.it
Dozens of vulnerable children were failed by social workers with some young people going on to be killed or seriously injured, inspectors found.The needs of neglected young people are not being monitored because of uncertainty over Scotland’s named person service, a report concludes.The Care Inspect...
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Personal outcomes resources to support you in your role – SSSC News

Personal outcomes resources to support you in your role – SSSC News | Social services news | Scoop.it
Carers Week 10 – 16 June 2019 Working with people who use services, carers and workers, we have developed resources to support workers and organisations to share, develop and embed personal outcomes approaches in practice. A personal outcomes approach underpinned the co-design of these resources with collaboration, inclusion, informed choice and outcome focus integral to their development. Our ebook focuses on personal outcomes and enabling conversations that meet the requirements in the Carers (Scotland) Act 2016 for carer support planning and builds connections with self-directed support and anticipatory care planning. Although the ebook is to support professional practice around the production of adult carer support planning and young carer statements, the focus is broader than this. Although not all health and social care practitioners are directly involved in carer support planning, most do have regular contact with unpaid carers. So with the broader workforce in mind, the ebook includes examples and interactive resources to encourage consideration of carers by all practitioners. It also connects to other resources including EPiC (Equal Partners in Care) and Coalition of Carers in Scotland Resources. Booklet and mapping guide Our awareness raising information booklet on understanding personal outcomes includes information on values, principles, key elements of the approach and further resources to help develop and embed personal outcomes in practice. Our mapping resource scopes and explains the range of related approaches, policies and projects around personal outcomes, person-centred working and personalisation across health, social care, housing and wider public services, clarifying similarities and differences with examples drawn from the public, private and third sectors. Other personal outcomes resources The personal outcomes collaboration website is an evidence based website full of practical resources on personal outcomes and is the main website for the Personal Outcomes Network. The Personal Outcomes Network is a national cross sector group with membership from across health, social care and housing. Members work in a wide range of roles but share a common passion for developing and implementing personal outcomes approaches locally and nationally. The network meets quarterly. It is an open group based on self-organisational principles, which aims to offer a safe place for reflection and sharing of practice through stories, learning, resources and evidence. If you are interested in joining the Personal Outcomes Network, please email sdsandintegration@sssc.uk.com Carers Act  We developed the resources to support implementation of the Carers (Scotland) Act 2016. There are currently 788,000 people in Scotland who are caring for a relative, friend or neighbour, according to estimates, including 44,000 who are under the age of 18. You may be a parent, partner, son or daughter, sister or brother or friend to someone who needs support as a result of their illness, condition or disability. If you provide them with help and support to manage their life you are also a carer. The Carers (Scotland) Act 2016, which came into effect on 1 April 2018, is designed to support carers and make caring more sustainable. The Carers (Scotland) Act includes the following duties. Duties on responsible local authorities and other responsible authorities to prepare an adult carer support plan (ACSP) or a young carer statement (YCS) to identify each carer’s needs for support and personal outcomes. A duty on local authorities to provide support to carers, based on the carer’s identified needs which meet the local eligibility criteria. Even if a carer needs are not eligible at that time, they should still be able to access preventative services including the information and advice services the local authority is required to provide under the Act. Responsible local authorities should also consider the carer’s own strengths or if any other support might be available in the community to meet their needs. carersyoung carers
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The Guardian view on failures to protect children: the buck stops where? | Editorial | Opinion | The Guardian

The Guardian view on failures to protect children: the buck stops where? | Editorial | Opinion | The Guardian | Social services news | Scoop.it
Editorial: Two reports about the circumstances surrounding the murders of two children in Northamptonshire beg as many questions as they answer...
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Suicide prevention action plan: every life matters - gov.scot

Suicide prevention action plan: every life matters - gov.scot | Social services news | Scoop.it
The new action plan has been designed to continue the work from the 2013-2016 suicide prevention strategy and the downward trend in suicide rates in Scotland.
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Inclusion is key to preventing further abuse

Inclusion is key to preventing further abuse | Social services news | Scoop.it
People with learning disabilities deserve to be treated with dignity and respect, so it was shocking to see behaviour that fell so drastically short of these standards that it warranted criminal charges.
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Unpaid carers face loneliness epidemic

Unpaid carers face loneliness epidemic | Social services news | Scoop.it
The only third sector news outlet in Scotland dedicated to sharing news from charities and voluntary organisations.
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