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Doctors and Social Media: A Response by Daniel Sokol •

Doctors and Social Media: A Response by Daniel Sokol • | social media strategy | Scoop.it

On June 10th, 2019, Stat published a short article of mine entitled ‘Doctors: use social media with restraint’.  Within hours, criticisms flooded in.

Shortly before the Stat publication, I had been invited to deliver a lecture on Sir William Osler.  I took this opportunity to re-read Osler’s essays and came to the conclusion that, were he magically revived, Osler would be horrified by the exhibitionism, braggadocio and inter-specialty mud-slinging of some doctors on Twitter.

In the Stat piece, I described the ‘descent [of doctors] onto the bustling crowds of social media’ and the fact that ‘doctors, who hitherto got things off their chests in private, now bellow their discontent to the world.’  I suggested that, as well as benefits, there may be risks associated with this and that doctors on social media ‘must ask themselves whether the benefits of this candor outweigh the possible harms to their own reputation and to the image of the profession as a whole.’

The response from the medical community was immediate.

Some resorted to insults, saying “eff this” and calling me an idiot.

Some misread the article and assumed I was calling for a total ban on social media for doctors.  The title of the piece was accurate: ‘use social media with restraint’.  Social media can be a force for good.  Doctors can correct falsehoods and advocate for change.  They can shed light on the practise of medicine, flaws in the system, and practical implications of policies.  They can reach people that do not read articles in newspapers or journals.  They can direct people to reliable sources of information and engage them in public health discussions. They can create professional networks, support each other and inspire others.

 

 

Some doctors questioned whether I was qualified to make such comments as a non-doctor: “the best part is that the author is – wait for it – a lawyer”.  I am not a medical doctor but I have studied doctors and bioethics for many years, taught ethics in medical schools and hospitals, and then sued and defended doctors (and medical students) for many more. In any event, I fail to see why only a doctor can opine on the appropriate use of social media by doctors.

Some assumed that I believed doctors who suffer from mental health problems should just ‘stay silent’.  Nothing could be further from the truth: they should seek help, like anyone else, but whether they should tell the world on Twitter about their drug addiction, depression, or any other condition is more contentious.

Dr. Dana Corriel, in a recent blog post on this website, commented:

 

‘SOKOL’S COMMENTARY SCHOOLED THE WRONG GROUP OF PEOPLE.  PHYSICIANS ARE ADULTS WHO HAVE SURVIVED EXTENSIVE YEARS OF TRAINING, AND ARE SOME OF THE BRIGHTEST AMONG US – ARE THESE PROFESSIONALS REALLY NOT CAPABLE OF WEIGHING THEIR OWN OPTIONS AT HAND, FOR SOCIALIZING (ESPECIALLY WHEN ADVICE ABOUT IT IS DOLED OUT BY SOMEONE NOT IN THEIR FIELD)?’


 

I do not share her optimism.  My own experience is that there are many doctors in the Twittersphere – however academically gifted they may be – who use Twitter in a way that does the profession and their reputation no favours.  Only today one doctor tweeted: “So much negativity toward interns today on #SoMeDocs”.  Surely such negativity can be harmful to these new doctors, and to the public’s perception of them.

The danger of Twitter’s informality is the gradual, imperceptible erosion of one’s social filter. I doubt the doctors who said “eff this” and “idiot” would have spoken in this way in a conference.  The consequences of an eroded social filter can be serious for doctors, lawyers, pilots and other such professions, and no doubt some do get into trouble for ill-judged posts or tweets.

 

The #danger of Twitter’s informality is the gradual, imperceptible erosion of one’s social filter. I doubt the doctors who said “eff this” and “idiot” would have spoken in this way in a #conference.CLICK TO TWEET

 

The Stat article was not written out of hate or contempt for the medical profession but out of a profound admiration for it. Some doctors wondered why doctors should be held to a different standard to anyone else.  After all, they observed, doctors are human. In ‘Tough Choices: Stories from the Front Line of Medical Ethics’, I asked whether being a doctor was ‘just a job’.  My answer:

‘Being a doctor is not ‘just a job’, or at least it should not be.  It possesses a moral dimension not found in nearly all other jobs.  Hence why there is no Professor in Baking Ethics, or Painting and Decorating Ethics, or Hairdressing Ethics, and why [Richard] Selzer was so incensed when he saw the medical graduates making light of the [Hippocratic] oath.  In the Hippocratic oath, the doctors swore by ‘Apollo, Asclepius, Hygeia, Panacea and by all the gods and goddesses’.  In the secular version, doctors ‘solemnly’ pledge.  The purpose?  To acknowledge the privilege, importance and dignity of treating a fellow human being in need.’

 

 

In the public sphere that is social media, doctors cannot conduct themselves in the same manner as anyone else.  This is because they are doctors.  They must act with dignity and respect and avoid damaging the hard-earned reputation of the medical profession.  It may be common sense but, as Voltaire allegedly said, ‘common sense is not so common’. The need for medical associations and regulators to issue guidance on doctors’ use of social media also suggests that the matter is not self-evident.


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The most popular social media networks each year, gloriously animated

The most popular social media networks each year, gloriously animated | social media strategy | Scoop.it

It's hard to remember a world without social media, but it existed – as did a lot of other networks. We tracked their evolution.


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3 Ways Social Media Can Improve Healthcare Marketing Efforts

3 Ways Social Media Can Improve Healthcare Marketing Efforts | social media strategy | Scoop.it

Social media is in its prime. According to a 2018 report by Adobe Digital Insights, Social media is the most relevant advertising channel for 50% of Gen Z and 42% of millennials. The significance of this statistic cannot be underestimated. 

For the healthcare industry in particular, social media can help engage patients, providers, and the public with relevant and timely information, as well as communicate the value and credibility of the health system.

Findings from the 2018 Sprout Social Index found that posts with links to more information are the most preferred type of content on social media. In addition, 30% of consumers said that this is the kind of content they’d like to see most from brands on social. 18% preferred graphics and images, while 17% would like to see produced video.

The wide variety of content that can be distributed via social media – from images and video to mixed-media blog posts, polls, and infographics – is a great way for healthcare brands to begin to capitalize on their mission and engage with patients through captivating, often emotionally-charged subject matter. 

When executed correctly, social media campaigns are incredibly powerful. Of course, proper targeting and optimization is necessary to begin to map out your strategy. This planning is best executed with a healthcare CRM or other database in place to gauge your market opportunities. 

If your organization has not yet begun to capitalize on this marketing tactic, it’s time to reevaluate your strategy:
Why is Social Media Becoming a Critical Component of Healthcare Marketing Strategy?

A recent study by PwC found that 42% of individuals viewing health information on social media look at health-related consumer reviews prior to reaching out, proving that positive feedback – even that provided by strangers – is a powerful means to building trust. The same report also found that 32% of US users post about their friends’ and family’s healthcare experiences on social media. 

According to another report by PewResearch, 80% of social media users are specifically looking for health information, and nearly half of those are searching for information about a specific doctor or health professional.

If the statistics alone don’t demonstrate the value of social media for healthcare, then the opportunity to engage one-on-one with patients and providers should. As has been proven many times, individualization is key to modern marketing tactics. Social media provides an excellent opportunity for healthcare organizations to increase patient referrals and improve the overall quality of care – therefore, it’s no surprise that many health systems are jumping on the social media bandwagon. 

Let’s take a look at three ways social media can improve overall healthcare marketing efforts:

1. Engage with Patients in Real-Time

One of the benefits of social media marketing in healthcare is enabling deeper and more meaningful discussions that address patient questions, concerns, and interests in real-time.

The question is: How can healthcare marketers effectively use social media to communicate and engage with existing patients?

Health systems can facilitate patient empowerment by enabling and engaging in patient forums and research networks online. For example, PatientsLikeMe allows patients to manage their own health conditions by discussing treatments with patients who have similar conditions. Hospitals and other health networks can develop their own platforms that allow patients to share their experiences and receive support from similar individuals.

Along with forums, health systems can use social networking pages to encourage patient discussions. For example, Children’s Mercy uses their Facebook page as way to showcase their reputation as a renowned care center. “Locally, Children’s Mercy wants parents to know their kids are in good hands. Social is a good way to share news and feature CMH doctors and patients,” according to PR Director Jake Jacobson.

What Social Media Tactics Best Promote Patient Engagement?


This video promotes Children’s Mercy’s Research Institute and, in particular, their cystic fibrosis research program. Posts such as these encourage members of the community to support the hospital’s research efforts while also raising awareness around disease and treatment – especially for lesser-known conditions. 

According to the Journal of Health Management, “When patients tell their stories, their friends see that and the likelihood of spreading the message increases many-fold.” A video like this one tells a story that community members can easily relate to, creating a positive, trust-enforcing image for Children’s Mercy. 

To successfully engage patients on social media forums or networking sites, organizations must regularly monitor these platforms to respond to patients in a timely manner, as well as ensure a variety of fresh, engaging content is uploaded regularly to keep patients interested and engaged.


2. Facilitate Physician Collaboration

Healthcare marketers can also use social media channels to encourage physician alignment and collaboration. Texas Health, a network of 25 hospitals that employs 5,500 physicians, created an enterprise social network to help physicians communicate and work with one another in overcoming challenges posed by the work environment, such as EHR requirements.

As a result of this networking initiative, the health system saw improved physician collaboration, in addition to a shorter learning period and greater acceptance of using social media tools.

Why Should Healthcare Marketers be Concerned with Improving Physician Alignment and Collaboration?

Social media is an easy way for physicians to find and connect with other health professionals, even those outside of their own health system or hospital. Physicians can also share their knowledge or research to benefit other providers and even communicate with colleagues about patient issues. 

According to Master of Health Administration, 88% of physicians use the Internet and social media to research pharmaceutical, biotech, and medical devices. Social media helps doctors stay up to date in the rapidly-changing healthcare environment – not only about patients themselves, but about new research and technology that can better facilitate care.  

Overall, these practices improve physicians’ knowledge and willingness to work as a team. The more informed and educated a health system’s physicians are, the happier patients will be with their experience and the quality of care provided. 

Ultimately, healthcare marketers should strive to provide patients with better experiences in order to foster loyalty, retention, and positive word-of-mouth referrals. Improving physician engagement and alignment via network-driven social media networks is one way to do so.

 

3. Support Population & Preventative Health Initiatives

Since many social media sites are public communication platforms that can reach a wide breadth of individuals, healthcare organizations can use this marketing tactic to support broader population health and preventative health initiatives.

One way to do this is to communicate educational information about health events and crises. Lee Aase of Mayo Clinic and Shannon Dosemagen of Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science, say “organizations can use social media to distribute time-sensitive health information, promote information sharing to encourage behavioral changes (including corrective changes during potential health crises), be a platform for conversation between agencies and constituents (rather than just as an information provider), and allow the public to provide useful information and feedback.”

MayoChildren'sCenter@MayoClinicKids
 
 

If you're spending time outdoors in the brush, you're also at higher risk of brushing up against a poisonous plant. Exposure to plants like #poisonivy can cause an itchy rash that lasts for weeks. So how do you treat it?https://mayocl.in/2KpZjQf ;

 
9
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See MayoChildren'sCenter's other Tweets
 
 

 

Healthcare organizations can also use social media as a platform to distribute information about common health conditions, diseases, and other public health issues in the hopes of preventing these occurrences.

As John Weston, CMO of Mayo Clinic notes, “We leverage the rich content we have to provide consumers with information about diseases and conditions, even when it is likely they may never become a patient. We view this as part of our moral responsibility—to share our knowledge and expertise to benefit others.”

Key Takeaways

Though social media does provide the opportunity for healthcare organizations to reach large consumer and patient populations, marketers need to be mindful of maintaining HIPAA compliance and other privacy regulations on these public platforms. Providers can maintain the trust of patient-provider relationships by staying far away from personal patient information and establishing a professional presence. 

Keeping this in mind, social media marketing in healthcare has the potential to improve patient engagement, drive physician alignment, and foster a healthier society overall. Campaigns that are executed with strategic, targeted goals and that align with a multi-channel marketing strategy will see the most success. 


Grow your company: https://www.sociallyin.com/social-media-services/social-media-strategy/


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The 5 Things Entrepreneurs Should Never Post on Social Media

The 5 Things Entrepreneurs Should Never Post on Social Media | social media strategy | Scoop.it
Social media offers a great opportunity to build your brand, increase engagement in authentic ways, show what your company is really about and totally screw things up. Case in point: American Apparel's 2014 social media gaffe. To promote a July 4th sale, the company tweeted what they thought was a picture of fireworks. It wasn't fireworks though -- it was the Space Shuttle Challenger exploding in mid-air in 1986. The public was not pleased, and many stopped following American Apparel online. Though companies can recover from such a mistake, doing so wastes time and money that should be used to grow the company. So, before you pull an American Apparel-sized goof, here are five things entrepreneurs should never put on social media.


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Social media opens new avenue to advocacy in rheumatology

Social media opens new avenue to advocacy in rheumatology | social media strategy | Scoop.it

Political activism is more accessible than ever thanks to the amplification offered by social media, and rheumatologists can use social media — particularly Twitter — to advocate for the profession and their patients, according to Angus Worthing, MD, private practice rheumatologist and chair of the Government Affairs Committee for the American College of Rheumatology.

Worthing recently sat down with Healio Rheumatology to discuss his rheumatology advocacy campaign, called #ThingADay, in which he posted actions rheumatologists could take each day to advocate for the profession and to improve patient care.

 Stay Informed and Active

One of Worthing’s recommended tasks was to learn more about biosimilars, which as he stated in the Twitter post, are “the most medically acceptable [and] politically feasible way to lower rheum drug prices.”

Worthing said biosimilars can be thought of roughly as generic biologic drugs; the main difference between generics and biosimilars is that biosimilars can have slight differences from their brand name equivalences due to their size and complexity.

“The FDA did not have the authority to approve [the generic versions of] biologics until the Affordable Care Act included that authorization in 2010,” Worthing explained. “Now the FDA has a pathway for a biosimilar approval process and there are 18 biosimilars that have been FDA-approved — several in rheumatology — but unfortunately only two of those biosimilars are available for rheumatology patients in the marketplace.”

For biosimilars to become readily available in the U.S., Worthing said step therapy needs to be reformed and insurance companies and pharmacy benefits managers need to be more transparent. According to current step therapy protocols, Worthing said, biosimilars can only be used if the preferred drug is tried and shown to be ineffective.

“Even when I prescribe a biosimilar, which is about 20% less expensive than a bio-originator or brand name, it’s often not approved. Instead, the patient is supposed to take the more expensive drug,” Worthing said. “Step therapy and these kinds of legislation management tools are some of the most frustrating parts about being a doctor in the U.S. today and they are very frustrating for patients because they delay effective treatment.”

While Worthing wants to improve the availability of biosimilars and has been working with the ACR to connect with leaders in Congress on this issue, he noted that his goal for other rheumatologists is to educate themselves and come to their own conclusions about biosimilars.

 

“I think the main way that rheumatologists can get involved is simply to learn and become comfortable with what a biosimilar is and find out more about them,” he said. He suggested an ACR white paper, “The Science Behind Biosimilars,” (of which he is a coauthor) as a good starting point.

Promote Research and Preventive Measures

 

Another action item from #ThingADay was to email Congress in support of arthritis research, specifically a $20 million request to the Department of Defense’s (DOD) Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) to create an arthritis research program. Worthing noted that one in three military veterans have arthritis and it is the second most common cause of medical discharge.

“The DOD is an excellent place for arthritis and rheumatology research to happen, partly because they can design and implement ways to protect the joints of our service members; for example, to avoid injuries that would lead to osteoarthritis of the knee or other joints. They also have a serum bank, so blood samples are drawn from active service members that can be tested for evidence of autoimmune diseases later on. There are also excellent longitudinal medical records that can be researched to find out some potential causes and treatments for arthritis.”

Additionally, Worthing suggested rheumatologists support increasing access to DEXA scans, in particular by advocating for the Increasing Access to Osteoporosis Testing for Medicare Beneficiaries Act (S. 283). Worthing said since reimbursement for DEXA scans decreased to less than the cost to provide the service, far fewer scans have been provided. “Now unfortunately we are seeing an uptick in ... surprise hip fractures ... which is really a shame in the United States, that we are seeing worsening in a medical problem that is easy and inexpensive to prevent,” he said.

According to Worthing, S. 283 “raises the reimbursement for a DEXA scan service to a level that is sustainable and allows doctors to provide the service, and we hope that more people will be able to obtain this screening test so that we can prevent more fractures.”

Develop a Professional Voice

Worthing finds value in Twitter as a platform that gives everyone a voice. “It’s such an effective way to communicate with fellow advocates, people involved in health policy and also the actual leaders and their staff on Capitol Hill,” he said. “It’s instantaneous and free and can be leveraged really quickly. When influencers, or people in media or leaders — the people who are writing bills and legislation — see tweets and retweet things, ideas and issues can come up and suddenly get noticed.”

 

Worthing said he created the #ThingADay campaign to provide easy access to many ideas that anyone could implement in their typical day. He wanted to create a handy guide on “how to email Congress, how to read up on the issues, how to connect with other people, invite Congress into your office if you’re a physician — all the little things you can do, large or small, sort of as ‘one thing a day’ to be a political advocate.”

He said the ACR’s Legislative Action Center showed increased activity after the #ThingADay campaign, which is the exact response he had hoped for. In his volunteer leadership role with ACR, Worthing helps coordinate ACR’s response to federal decisions, and one of his goals is to increase the number of rheumatologists who use ACR’s online Legislative Action Center.

 

“Ultimately, I think my job as kind of a lead advocate for rheumatology is to get people using these tools on their own and making their own — either Twitter threads or using [the information] on their own in productive ways,” he said. “I usually try to encourage people to use social media, which is, I think, really effective on a professional level ... putting out a professional face as a physician advocate.”

Worthing added that RheumPAC, the ACR’s political action committee, is an additional way to pool a group of voices. “For a small specialty like rheumatology, with only 6,000 out of the million doctors in the country, RheumPAC is a very effective way for us to leverage our voice,” he said. He noted that RheumPAC is for ACR members only, and supports “candidates on both sides of the aisle who are champions of rheumatology reforms.”

He added, “I think in a representative democracy, our institutions require informed input, and I strongly support my fellow doctors and our patients to raise their voice[s] because we are the experts that Congress needs to hear from, and social media and Twitter are a great way to do it.” – by Amanda Alexander

Disclosure: Worthing reports no relevant financial disclosures.


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7 Reasons Content Marketing is Overwhelming

7 Reasons Content Marketing is Overwhelming | social media strategy | Scoop.it

Great content marketing takes time and attention to detail as well as consistent execution. Here are 7 Reasons Content Marketing is Overwhelming.


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Doctors and Social Media: A Response by Daniel Sokol •

Doctors and Social Media: A Response by Daniel Sokol • | social media strategy | Scoop.it

On June 10th, 2019, Stat published a short article of mine entitled ‘Doctors: use social media with restraint’.  Within hours, criticisms flooded in.

Shortly before the Stat publication, I had been invited to deliver a lecture on Sir William Osler.  I took this opportunity to re-read Osler’s essays and came to the conclusion that, were he magically revived, Osler would be horrified by the exhibitionism, braggadocio and inter-specialty mud-slinging of some doctors on Twitter.

In the Stat piece, I described the ‘descent [of doctors] onto the bustling crowds of social media’ and the fact that ‘doctors, who hitherto got things off their chests in private, now bellow their discontent to the world.’  I suggested that, as well as benefits, there may be risks associated with this and that doctors on social media ‘must ask themselves whether the benefits of this candor outweigh the possible harms to their own reputation and to the image of the profession as a whole.’

The response from the medical community was immediate.

Some resorted to insults, saying “eff this” and calling me an idiot.

Some misread the article and assumed I was calling for a total ban on social media for doctors.  The title of the piece was accurate: ‘use social media with restraint’.  Social media can be a force for good.  Doctors can correct falsehoods and advocate for change.  They can shed light on the practise of medicine, flaws in the system, and practical implications of policies.  They can reach people that do not read articles in newspapers or journals.  They can direct people to reliable sources of information and engage them in public health discussions. They can create professional networks, support each other and inspire others.

 

 

Some doctors questioned whether I was qualified to make such comments as a non-doctor: “the best part is that the author is – wait for it – a lawyer”.  I am not a medical doctor but I have studied doctors and bioethics for many years, taught ethics in medical schools and hospitals, and then sued and defended doctors (and medical students) for many more. In any event, I fail to see why only a doctor can opine on the appropriate use of social media by doctors.

Some assumed that I believed doctors who suffer from mental health problems should just ‘stay silent’.  Nothing could be further from the truth: they should seek help, like anyone else, but whether they should tell the world on Twitter about their drug addiction, depression, or any other condition is more contentious.

Dr. Dana Corriel, in a recent blog post on this website, commented:

 

‘SOKOL’S COMMENTARY SCHOOLED THE WRONG GROUP OF PEOPLE.  PHYSICIANS ARE ADULTS WHO HAVE SURVIVED EXTENSIVE YEARS OF TRAINING, AND ARE SOME OF THE BRIGHTEST AMONG US – ARE THESE PROFESSIONALS REALLY NOT CAPABLE OF WEIGHING THEIR OWN OPTIONS AT HAND, FOR SOCIALIZING (ESPECIALLY WHEN ADVICE ABOUT IT IS DOLED OUT BY SOMEONE NOT IN THEIR FIELD)?’


 

I do not share her optimism.  My own experience is that there are many doctors in the Twittersphere – however academically gifted they may be – who use Twitter in a way that does the profession and their reputation no favours.  Only today one doctor tweeted: “So much negativity toward interns today on #SoMeDocs”.  Surely such negativity can be harmful to these new doctors, and to the public’s perception of them.

The danger of Twitter’s informality is the gradual, imperceptible erosion of one’s social filter. I doubt the doctors who said “eff this” and “idiot” would have spoken in this way in a conference.  The consequences of an eroded social filter can be serious for doctors, lawyers, pilots and other such professions, and no doubt some do get into trouble for ill-judged posts or tweets.

 

The #danger of Twitter’s informality is the gradual, imperceptible erosion of one’s social filter. I doubt the doctors who said “eff this” and “idiot” would have spoken in this way in a #conference.CLICK TO TWEET

 

The Stat article was not written out of hate or contempt for the medical profession but out of a profound admiration for it. Some doctors wondered why doctors should be held to a different standard to anyone else.  After all, they observed, doctors are human. In ‘Tough Choices: Stories from the Front Line of Medical Ethics’, I asked whether being a doctor was ‘just a job’.  My answer:

‘Being a doctor is not ‘just a job’, or at least it should not be.  It possesses a moral dimension not found in nearly all other jobs.  Hence why there is no Professor in Baking Ethics, or Painting and Decorating Ethics, or Hairdressing Ethics, and why [Richard] Selzer was so incensed when he saw the medical graduates making light of the [Hippocratic] oath.  In the Hippocratic oath, the doctors swore by ‘Apollo, Asclepius, Hygeia, Panacea and by all the gods and goddesses’.  In the secular version, doctors ‘solemnly’ pledge.  The purpose?  To acknowledge the privilege, importance and dignity of treating a fellow human being in need.’

 

 

In the public sphere that is social media, doctors cannot conduct themselves in the same manner as anyone else.  This is because they are doctors.  They must act with dignity and respect and avoid damaging the hard-earned reputation of the medical profession.  It may be common sense but, as Voltaire allegedly said, ‘common sense is not so common’. The need for medical associations and regulators to issue guidance on doctors’ use of social media also suggests that the matter is not self-evident.


Grow your company: https://www.sociallyin.com/social-media-services/social-media-strategy/


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Sociallyin has dedicated team to create and execute unique social media strategy for YOUR BRAND. Call today at (205) 547-0514 and start building brand awareness.
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How to Get Executive Buy-In with an Effective Content Marketing Strategy

How to Get Executive Buy-In with an Effective Content Marketing Strategy | social media strategy | Scoop.it
As a marketer, you already know that content marketing is well worth your time and effort. What you put in is almost guaranteed to be returned to you many times over, and this attractive ROI combined with low costs and barriers to entry makes content marketing one of the most popular marketing strategies for businesses large and small.


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Elizabeth R Goff's insight:
Sociallyin has dedicated team to create and execute unique social media strategy for YOUR BRAND. Call today at (205) 547-0514 and start building brand awareness.
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Nonprofit Blogging Tips And Why You Need To Blog

Nonprofit Blogging Tips And Why You Need To Blog | social media strategy | Scoop.it

Nonprofit blogging offers organizations a unique position to leverage its cause and speak directly to its target audience. Read these nonprofit blog tips.


Grow your company https://www.sociallyin.com/social-media-services/social-media-strategy/


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Social Media Strategy Services | Sociallyin

Social Media Strategy Services | Sociallyin | social media strategy | Scoop.it


A successful marketing campaign begins and ends with a tactful strategy. We believe the same is true for social media. Our team is dedicated to creating and executing unique strategies for your brand. We know that social media gives brands the power to reach their ideal audiences through granular targeting, relevant content, and meaningful conversation. However, reaching social media’s full potential can be tricky. With so many ever-changing platforms, performing the day-to-day online operations can become a grueling task. Sociallyin is committed to remaining a step ahead of online trends and keeping your brand at the forefront of the social media world.

Our strategy is simple: research, development, results. 

Beginning with research and development allows us to understand your brand, your audience, and your goals. We are able to use the strategy to measure each step and analyze what tactics are working through the process. Your company will understand how every installment is calculated and why our team chose to do it. Ultimately, our objective is to establish a strategy that leads to increasing your bottom line. 

With a clear understanding of your business, prospects, voice, messaging, branding, and goals, we are able to create a unique social package for your company. The social media package lays the groundwork for the next step: execution. Our work is unique, relevant, and tailored to your brand identity. In some cases we execute extensive strategies including focus groups, on-site research, & more.

Benefits of a social media strategy: 

An all-around team understanding of the brand voice, messaging, visual guidelines, and general ground rules. It sets objectives for the leadership team and execution team on what expectations are in terms of success. A strategy helps guide the amount of posts we should make over the course of a month. It helps answer critical questions like “what type of content should we create?” and “What are our ultimate goals?” It can help determine what the most important metrics to measure success are.

Interested in learning more about how our tailored social media strategy can benefit your business? 

Give us a call today and let’s discuss your opportunities!

Elizabeth R Goff's insight:
Sociallyin has dedicated a team to create and execute unique social media strategy for YOUR BRAND. Call today at (205) 547-0514 and start building brand awareness.
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Social Media Strategy | Build Your Brand Awareness With Sociallyin

Social Media Strategy | Build Your Brand Awareness With Sociallyin | social media strategy | Scoop.it

Sociallyin has dedicated team to create and execute unique social media strategy for YOUR BRAND. Call today at (205) 547-0514 and start building brand awareness.


Find more about our services https://www.sociallyin.com/social-media-services/social-media-strategy/

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