Health Care Social Media And Digital Health
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The Benefits and Pitfalls of Blogging About Your Illness

The Benefits and Pitfalls of Blogging About Your Illness | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
In her latest blog, Marie Ennis-O'Connor shares some of her concerns and experience about blogging.
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Listen and Engage: Pharma and Social Media

Listen and Engage: Pharma and Social Media | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

Globally, 83% of people online use the Internet to find information on chronic illness. Patients and doctors worldwide participate in online communities, sharing experiences and stories.

 

In reality, this leaves pharma no choice but to participate. But should you take an active role or be a passive observer? Trish Nettleship, Director for Social Media and Influence at UCB, believes there are key tenants to successfully engaging in this space, and she shares them with eyeforpharma.

 

“The first thing is to understand patient needs. The second thing is to engage. This is how you build great customer experiences,” said Nettleship. “We’re actively seeking information to better understand what [a patient’s] needs are, and from there we’re looking to engage with our patient community. But the listening never stops.” Done well, this engagement will lead to customers sharing their positive experiences with their peers, effectively advocating on behalf of the company, but soon that won’t be enough.

 

“How do we take it a step further without butting into the conversation? We need to uncover opportunities to help our customers. For example one of our products is a patch, and we’re having conversations about the difficulties people have using it. We know exactly how to solve this. There is an opportunity to go out there and help our customers in a more proactive way. We need to engage outside of our own four walls.”

 

UCB’s activities within epilepsy are a good example of a well-executed, successful campaign. Trish had frequently heard from physicians and patients that they were still accepting the presence of seizures. “The doctor would ask if they were okay, and they would say they might be better than last year or last month, but they were not seizure-free,” Nettleship recounted, “we build a whole campaign around ‘okay is not good enough, go beyond okay.’ We launched it across all social platforms, and we saw people talking about seizure freedom, using the terminology ‘go beyond okay.’ At the same time, doctors reported more patients coming in talking about the campaign, asking what can be done differently. That was our goal.”


Read more: http://social.eyeforpharma.com/digital/listen-and-engage-pharma-and-social-media


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Use of social media ‘humanises’ doctors #hcsm

Use of social media ‘humanises’ doctors #hcsm | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

Engagement with social media on health issues “humanises” doctors in the eyes of patients, a consultant rheumatologist told delegates at the ICGP Winter Meeting.

 

Galway-based Dr Ronan Kavanagh, who addressed members through a pre-recorded interview that is available on YouTube, said his engagement with social media sites like Twitter “allows me to present a more human side of myself to patients”.

 

Dr Kavanagh writes regular blog posts that help patients “decipher topical medical news” and his Facebook page allows for a certain discussion with the patient population. “I’m happy to answer generic questions, as opposed to questions specific to their healthcare,” he said.

Social media also facilitated him in connecting with the international rheumatology community.

 

Dr Kavanagh acknowledged many doctors were not interested in social media but emphasised that it was a very powerful tool.

 

“You need to be at least aware that it is going on. If you are sceptical and there is a GP practice down the road offering a social media service to patients, just see what happens,” he said.

 

In response, one GP at the workshop, expressed a view shared by many, that GPs were “overwhelmed” and engaging with social media seemed like more work. “My concern is this is another addition to my overwhelmed life,” he said.

 

Medical columnist Dr Liam Farrell, who hosted the workshop with ICGP Network of Establishing GPs (NEGs) Director Dr Peter Sloane, said that although social media “sounds like a lot of work”, it could reduce workloads if used “astutely”.

 

The Facebook page of the Haxby Group, a provider of GP services in the UK, was shown to delegates. The page — as opposed to profile — updated patients on surgery times, commencement of seasonal flu vaccines, professional achievements of staff, and national and international media news. Patients who ‘liked’ the page would receive latest news into the feed on their own Facebook profile pages.

 

None of the GPs attending the meeting raised their hand when asked if they had a practice Facebook page, which is free to set up, whereas several had paid-for practice websites.

 

Read more at: http://www.imt.ie/news/latest-news/2013/12/use-of-social-media-humanises-doctors.html


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4 Reasons Your Medical Marketing Belongs on LinkedIn

4 Reasons Your Medical Marketing Belongs on LinkedIn | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

You probably have heard all the good arguments about why your practice should employ inbound marketing – and, in particular, why you should take advantage of the public’s embrace of social media to learn about and communicate with their doctors, dentists and other healthcare professionals.

 

Facebook and Twitter can be a great resource for patients, but when it comes to medical marketing among peers and potential employees, your more feasible choice is LinkedIn.


As the world’s largest business network, LinkedIn has some 225 million members as of June 2013, and more than 8 million of them are healthcare professionals. Broad-based groups like LinkedIn’sNetworking for Healthcare Professionals covers topics ranging from professional meetings to the trend toward filing claims electronically. Beyond that, there is a LinkedIn group for nearly any specialty or discipline. Just a sample of groups that have appeared include the Student Doctor Network, the Registered Nurse Group and Bio/Pharm Professionals.

 

Read more at: http://info.thespotonagency.com/blog/bid/320592/4-Reasons-Your-Medical-Marketing-Belongs-on-LinkedIn


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Professionalism in the Use of Social Media

Professionalism in the Use of Social Media | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

Physicians should be cognizant of standards of patient privacy and confidentiality that must be maintained in all environments, including online, and must refrain from posting identifiable patient information online. When using the Internet for social networking, physicians should use privacy settings to safeguard personal information and content to the extent possible, but should realize that privacy settings are not absolute and that once on the Internet, content is likely there permanently.  Thus, physicians should routinely monitor their own Internet presence to ensure that the personal and professional information on their own sites and, to the extent possible, content posted about them by others, is accurate and appropriate. If they interact with patients on the Internet, physicians must maintain appropriate boundaries of the patient-physician relationship in accordance with professional ethical guidelines just, as they would in any other context.To maintain appropriate professional boundaries physicians should consider separating personal and professional content online. When physicians see content posted by colleagues that appears unprofessional they have a responsibility to bring that content to the attention of the individual, so that he or she can remove it and/or take other appropriate actions.  If the behavior significantly violates professional norms and the individual does not take appropriate action to resolve the situation, the physician should report the matter to appropriate authorities. Physicians must recognize that actions online and content posted may negatively affect their reputations among patients and colleagues, may have consequences for their medical careers (particularly for physicians-in-training and medical students), and can undermine public trust in the medical profession. (I, II, IV) Read more at: http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/physician-resources/medical-ethics/code-medical-ethics/opinion9124.page


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Surgeon uses social media to encourage organ donation

Surgeon uses social media to encourage organ donation | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

New York State ranks the 49th worst state in the country when it comes to organ donation registration.

 

One local doctor is trying to change that using a younger generation and social media. Dr. Chris Barry is a transplant surgeon with the University of Rochester Medical Center. He started the group b-life New York because he says he's tired of seeing patients die while waiting for a donation.

 

With the help of student groups at U of R and RIT campuses,  his organization uses Facebook and Twitter to spread the message about the importance of organ donation, and talking about it with family.  “We’ve found that young people, they get organ donation,” said Barry. “They’re much more comfortable with the ideas of giving a gift after they pass.”

 

“It’s important to have those conversations because you want the people close to you to know what you would want to do and that it's important to you. Also, by having those conversations you can explain to people why it's a good decision,” said Lauren Sava, BLIFENY member.

 

You can find more information about organ donation at www.blifeny.org


Read More at: http://www.13wham.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/surgeon-uses-social-media-encourage-organ-donation-7762.shtml


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A new breed of physicians engaging with social media

A new breed of physicians engaging with social media | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

Health Care Social Media Monitor. A new breed of physicians is texting health messages to patients, tracking disease trends on Twitter, identifying medical problems on Facebook pages and communicating with patients through email.

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Medical Marketing on Pinterest: The Safest Place to Start Health Care Social Media #hcsm

Medical Marketing on Pinterest: The Safest Place to Start Health Care Social Media #hcsm | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

LET’S FACE IT, YOU’RE SCARED
Health care companies are not getting involved in Social Media because they’re scared. If you look at the hoops medical marketing directors have to jump through with their legal department, and then combine that with the pressures all marketers face, such as justifying marketing spend, it’s no wonder health care companies have chosen to stay on the sidelines.

 

SOCIAL LURES MARKETERS WITH MORE LEADS
But wait! Did you know that social media produces almost double the marketing leads of trade shows, telemarketing, direct mail, or PPC (Source: HubSpot)? It’s hard to not have your mouth water at the idea of doubling your leads. Why do we love leads? Because leads can be converted to sales, and everyone can appreciate an increase in sales (especially your boss and the C-Suite).

 

EVEN MEDICAL DEVICE COMPANIES ARE DOING IT
As Social Media becomes more universal and a basic tenant of business, even medical marketing executives are beginning to be tempted by the business benefits of going social. If you don’t believe me when I say that even medical device companies are embracing social media, just check out this Twitter list with more than one hundred companies involved in social media for medical devices. Allow yourself to be impressed, inspired by their brave step toward social, and reassured that it’s not a completely crazy idea. Don’t let the leaders scare you away either. Use them to light the way forward.

 

Read more: http://www.business2community.com/pinterest/medical-marketing-on-pinterest-the-safest-place-to-start-health-care-social-media-0539369#jQQgyK0wZc8TzovC.99


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Navigating Social Media in the Healthcare Industry #hcsm

Navigating Social Media in the Healthcare Industry #hcsm | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

There is no doubt about the power of social media. In simple terms, it allows companies to talk directly with their stakeholders. Those companies that do it well are those that are willing to listen, engage and act.
Social media are the platforms for consumer interaction and relationship building. It’s not complicated to implement a social media strategy, but it will take resources both in the time spent and as part of the overall marketing budget.
Here are some tips on how healthcare companies can execute a social media campaign: Plan:Develop a strategic social media plan. The plan should answer: Who are your audiences? Are you talking to consumers, other businesses or both? What are your messages? What do you have to offer your target markets through social media? How will you measure success? Without a realistic plan you will be ineffective and disappointed in your social media outreach.
Investigate:Not all social media properties fit all brands. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, LinkedIn, YouTube, a company blog or any number of other platforms are available. If you are a hospital, for example, you might want to establish a YouTube account to post videos of procedures, surgeries or lectures. If you are a growing heathcare company, you might want to start with LinkedIn as a way to promote job openings. One simple way to start is with a corporate blog that can be used to aggregate all published content to your other digital assets. The blog will also increase your search engine optimization (SEO) when you use key words and helps build inbound links and search engine trust. There’s flexibility with a blog; it can be used as a vehicle for corporate news and milestones, friendly reminders, customer Q&A and as a traffic driver for all social media assets or it can be an opinion piece on a timely healthcare topic.
Content is still king: In real estate it’s all about location, location, location. Online, it’s all about content, content, content. Google recognizes new content which also builds your SEO. The best way to achieve content is to develop a content calendar that targets and engages your audience. Sometimes it’s as simple as providing content for Facebook that can also be adapted at the same time for Twitter. New content is the key to keeping fans. Without it, they will move on to another brand.
Listen: This is probably one of the most important messages for the healthcare industry. It’s important to monitor social media properties for mentions of your brand and develop a tactical plan to document and take action when applicable, whether the online comments are positive or negative. Listening encourages engagement, builds trust and allows companies to cultivate a relationship with their customers.
Budget: What type of resources do you want to devote to a social media campaign and what are your budget considerations? Multinational and global companies have a numerous social media staff members devoted to their outreach. You can consider hiring someone in-house to handle social media initiatives or you can hire an outside consultant. In many cases, we have found that if the social media function ends up on the “to do” list of someone internally, be realistic. Social media may end up dropping to the bottom of their list which means it will not get done in the timely manner that it should.
Be patient:In the healthcare industry in particular, you likely will not experience social media success overnight. For any company starting out, this is a marathon, not a sprint. In time, you will build a following, grow your fan base and ultimately see a positive impact on business. With social media, you will only get out of it what you put in to it.
Read more: http://southfloridahospitalnews.com/page/Navigating_Social_Media_in_the_Healthcare_Industry/8802/1/


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Social Media Can Boost Disease Outbreak Monitoring, Study Finds

Social Media Can Boost Disease Outbreak Monitoring, Study Finds | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

Monitoring social media websites like Twitter could help health officials and providers identify in real time severe medical outbreaks, allowing them to more efficiently direct resources and curb the spread of disease, according to a San Diego State University studypublished last month in the Journal of Medical Internet Research,Medical News Today reports.

 

Study Details

 

For the study, lead researcher and San Diego State University geography professor Ming-Hsiang Tsou and his team used a program to monitor tweets that originated within a 17-mile radius of 11 cities. The program recorded details of tweets containing the words "flu" or "influenza," including:

 

Origin;Username;Whether the tweet was an original or a retweet; andAny links to websites in the tweet. 

 

Researchers then compared their findings with regional data based on CDC's definition of influenza-like illness.

  

The program recorded data on 161,821 tweets that included the word "flu" and 6,174 tweets that included the word "influenza" between June 2012 and the beginning of December 2012.

 

According to the study, nine of the 11 cities exhibited a statistically significant correlation between an uptick in the number of tweets mentioning the keywords and regional outbreak reports. In five of the cities -- Denver, Fort Worth, Jacksonville, San Diego and Seattle -- the algorithm noted the outbreaks sooner than regional reports.

 


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Drew Hodges's curator insight, February 19, 2015 5:50 PM

This is a cool article to show the real life change that social media is creating. Before it was stated that it would take up to two weeks to detect an outbreak of a disease but now with social media it can be done in a day. 

This article really shows how social media is becoming a part of our everyday life and is taking on roles that we probably didn't expect it to. 

However with the number of users increasing it is important to have tools that help us monitor the large amount of data that is present. 

Its no good having all this information if we cannot harness it's true potential, like the one illustrated in this article for disease break out.

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A Physician Perspective on Social Media

A Physician Perspective on Social Media | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

Technology is of the utmost importance in medical advances. Whether it is inside or outside the Operating Room, responsible surgeons use technology for the betterment of their patients and their practice. The advancement of social media has been one of the hottest technological trends ever to sweep the globe. Currently, people spend more time interacting with social media than they do all of the major news networks combined. A large majority of patients will research their physicians online before ever meeting face to face. Surgeons have the opportunity to influence what their patients’ see by getting involved in social media and interacting. If they choose to ignore it, the surgeon is leaving their “online profile” up to whoever chooses to write or post about them.

 

Social media comes in many different flavors. Facebook and Twitter are two of the most well-known platforms. Both allow people or corporations to have conversations with readers about anything they wish to discuss. These platforms can include pictures and video in order to further engage the reader. They can include links that will direct the reader to things posted elsewhere on the web, such as a physician’s website or videos posted on youtube.com. By getting involved with social media, the surgeon is allowing potential patients to learn about them, their personality and their practice before the patient ever steps foot inside their office.

 

Surgeons are also using social media as a way of interacting with colleagues and staying on top of advancements in their field. By creating Facebook and Twitter profiles, the Arthroscopy Journal keeps AANA members up-to-date on high-impact articles and surgical techniques. By following the Journal (Facebook: www.Facebook.com/ArthroscopyJournal; Twitter: @ArthroscopyJ), AANA members can seamlessly incorporate the Arthroscopy Journal into their everyday lives.

 

With every opportunity comes responsibility. Surgeons must always maintain patient confidentiality, especially when interacting with public platforms such as social media. There has been significant debate over liability that may arise from surgeon interactions on public platforms. While there are very few guidelines or precedents, the responsible surgeon will always avoid discussing specific cases or passing judgment on treatment options when posting on open, public platforms.


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Living With Diabetes: How I Use Social Media to Connect With Other Patients

Living With Diabetes: How I Use Social Media to Connect With Other Patients | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

Emotions. It’s not something that comes to mind when you think of someone living with diabetes. But believe it or not, there are many profound feelings and emotions involved with diabetes management.

 

So often, diabetes is about a number. The number that corresponds to a fingerstick. Thenumber you get every three months at the endocrinologist’s office. The number of times you’ve checked your blood sugar. The number of times you gave yourself a bolus of insulin. The number of carbohydrates in that snack you just had.

 

It’s exhausting. Trying to function as your own pancreas is flat out difficult. And because of both the stigma surrounding this disease and the nature of HIPPA laws, it can be downright lonely sometimes. Even when you’ve got the most supportive family and friends and a terrific team of doctors, it feels like a battle that can only be fought and understood by you.

 

Read more at: http://blog.fletcherallen.org/diabetes/living-with-diabetes-how-i-use-social-media-to-connect-with-other-patients/


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Social Media and Patient Advocacy

These are the slides from my talk at the 4th Annual Putting Patients First Conference in Mumbai.

 

If god were to manifest the world using technology, he would first create something like social media. Conceptually provide technology with the ability to understand the thoughts of a population


SocMed leaves behind the old model of 1-to-1 communication – “talking to someone over the phone”  Enables one-to-many communication (via blogs or microblogging) or many-to-many communication (discussion forums, social walls). Now anyone can setup an online community site/portal to represent a small or big offline community.

 

Further, anyone can setup an online site related to a treatment, a disease, a doctor, a drug , a concept or anything and see it grow into a popular site which in effect is simply the manifestation of a community which exists/ed but which no one ever knew of.


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Marie Ennis-O'Connors insight:

Thanks so much for sharing your slides - i am looking forward to reading them. 

Plaza Dental Group's curator insight, January 29, 2014 8:53 AM

Great info! I think SocMed  will boost the thought of population and will effect change in local communities. 

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Healthcare Marketing: 42 Ideas for Building a Better Hospital Brand

Healthcare Marketing: 42 Ideas for Building a Better Hospital Brand | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
Reblogged from MARKETING YOUR HOSPITAL: Becker’s Hospital Review  published an article providing 42 tips for building and promoting a hospital brand as offered by Dr. Rhoda Weiss, a healthcare c...
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