Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity
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SYSTEMS CHANGE & DEEP EQUITY

SYSTEMS CHANGE & DEEP EQUITY | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
Pathways Toward SustainableImpact, Beyond “Eureka!,”Unawareness & Unwitting Harm An Interview with Sheryl Petty and Mark Leach Below is the introduction to the full Systems Change & Deep Eq…...
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Network Development as Leverage for System Change

Network Development as Leverage for System Change | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
How focusing on diversity, flow and structure in human networks can be a foundation for great change. Over the past couple of years, we at IISC have partnered with a few different social change initiatives that have engaged in system mapping to both align diverse stakeholders and surface leverage points for collective intervention. In looking back at these... Read More
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Cultural complexity and complexity evolution

Dwight Read, Claes Andersson

 

We review issues stemming from current models regarding the drivers of cultural complexity and cultural evolution. We disagree with the implication of the treadmill model, based on dual-inheritance theory, that population size is the driver of cultural complexity. The treadmill model reduces the evolution of artifact complexity, measured by the number of parts, to the statistical fact that individuals with high skills are more likely to be found in a larger population than in a smaller population. However, for the treadmill model to operate as claimed, implausibly high skill levels must be assumed. Contrary to the treadmill model, the risk hypothesis for the complexity of artifacts relates the number of parts to increased functional efficiency of implements. Empirically, all data on hunter-gatherer artifact complexity support the risk hypothesis and reject the treadmill model. Still, there are conditions under which increased technological complexity relates to increased population size, but the dependency does not occur in the manner expressed in the treadmill model. Instead, it relates to population size when the support system for the technology requires a large population size. If anything, anthropology and ecology suggest that cultural complexity generates high population density rather than the other way around.


Via Complexity Digest
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The cost of coordination can exceed the benefit of collaboration in performing complex tasks

Vince J. Straub, Milena Tsvetkova, Taha Yasseri

 

Collective decision-making is ubiquitous when observing the behavior of intelligent agents, including humans. However, there are inconsistencies in our theoretical understanding of whether there is a collective advantage from interacting with group members of varying levels of competence in solving problems of varying complexity. Moreover, most existing experiments have relied on highly stylized tasks, reducing the generality of their results. The present study narrows the gap between experimental control and realistic settings, reporting the results from an analysis of collective problem-solving in the context of a real-world citizen science task environment in which individuals with manipulated differences in task-relevant training collaborated on the Wildcam Gorongosa task, hosted by The Zooniverse. We find that dyads gradually improve in performance but do not experience a collective benefit compared to individuals in most situations; rather, the cost of team coordination to efficiency and speed is consistently larger than the leverage of having a partner, even if they are expertly trained. It is only in terms of accuracy in the most complex tasks that having an additional expert significantly improves performance upon that of non-experts. Our findings have important theoretical and applied implications for collective problem-solving: to improve efficiency, one could prioritize providing task-relevant training and relying on trained experts working alone over interaction and to improve accuracy, one could target the expertise of selectively trained individuals.


Via Complexity Digest
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Complexity Scientist Beats Traffic Jams Through Adaptation

Complexity Scientist Beats Traffic Jams Through Adaptation | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
To tame urban traffic, the computer scientist Carlos Gershenson finds that letting transportation systems adapt and self-organize often works better than trying to predict and control them.
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Portfolio approaches to change: emerging patterns and resources

Portfolio approaches to change: emerging patterns and resources | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
This post focuses on the recent advancements in a 'portfolio' approach to change work which is happening across multiple organisations, and is an interesting signal in a move away from planning-based approaches.
june holleys insight:

Yes!

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Design Sketch for a Network of Collaboration Practitioners –

Design Sketch for a Network of Collaboration Practitioners – | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
Visit the post for more.
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The Self-Organizing Genome: Principles of Genome Architecture and Function

The Self-Organizing Genome: Principles of Genome Architecture and Function | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
Tom Misteli offers an update on how our view of genome organization has changed since
his classic 2007 review. Principles of heterogeneity and stochasticity, polymer-polymer
interactions, chromatin dynamics, phase separation, and architectural elements frame
the updated model.
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'Whack-a-mole' shows evolution doesn't go for perfection

'Whack-a-mole' shows evolution doesn't go for perfection | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
"It seems that evolution is myopic.It focuses on the most immediate problem, puts a Band-Aid on, and then it moves on to the next problem..."...
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Patterns and constraints –

Patterns and constraints – | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
It is the most human thing to recognize patterns.We are attuned to rhythms in nature that repeat: seasonal changes in the land around us, the ebb and flood of the tide, migrations of birds, the ri…...
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Understanding complex systems

Understanding complex systems | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
The climate emergency is so large it requires a rewiring of the whole economic and financial system. But to do this new risk models are required and old paradigms must be abandoned to make way for a better way of understanding complex systems.
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‘Trained Immunity’ Offers Hope in Fight Against Coronavirus

‘Trained Immunity’ Offers Hope in Fight Against Coronavirus | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
A novel form of immunological memory that was mostly ignored for a century extends the benefits of vaccines. It could be of help in ending the COVID-19 pandemic.

Via Complexity Digest
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Systems do change: the story of Rock 'n' Roll

Exploring the rock and roll movement through the lens of system change, we can see that rather than a lone hero, the influences behind rock and roll – societal, technological and niche - were complex and surprising. We believe that if we can learn to ‘dance’ with the system around us, which is changing all the time, we have a great chance of transforming the world we live in.
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Socio-economic, built environment, and mobility conditions associated with crime: a study of multiple cities

Marco De Nadai, Yanyan Xu, Emmanuel Letouzé, Marta C. González & Bruno Lepri 
Scientific Reports volume 10, Article number: 13871 (2020)

 

Nowadays, 23% of the world population lives in multi-million cities. In these metropolises, criminal activity is much higher and violent than in either small cities or rural areas. Thus, understanding what factors influence urban crime in big cities is a pressing need. Seminal studies analyse crime records through historical panel data or analysis of historical patterns combined with ecological factor and exploratory mapping. More recently, machine learning methods have provided informed crime prediction over time. However, previous studies have focused on a single city at a time, considering only a limited number of factors (such as socio-economical characteristics) and often at large in a single city. Hence, our understanding of the factors influencing crime across cultures and cities is very limited. Here we propose a Bayesian model to explore how violent and property crimes are related not only to socio-economic factors but also to the built environmental (e.g. land use) and mobility characteristics of neighbourhoods. To that end, we analyse crime at small areas and integrate multiple open data sources with mobile phone traces to compare how the different factors correlate with crime in diverse cities, namely Boston, Bogotá, Los Angeles and Chicago. We find that the combined use of socio-economic conditions, mobility information and physical characteristics of the neighbourhood effectively explain the emergence of crime, and improve the performance of the traditional approaches. However, we show that the socio-ecological factors of neighbourhoods relate to crime very differently from one city to another. Thus there is clearly no “one fits all” model.


Via Complexity Digest
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The cost of coordination can exceed the benefit of collaboration in performing complex tasks

Vince J. Straub, Milena Tsvetkova, Taha Yasseri

 

Collective decision-making is ubiquitous when observing the behavior of intelligent agents, including humans. However, there are inconsistencies in our theoretical understanding of whether there is a collective advantage from interacting with group members of varying levels of competence in solving problems of varying complexity. Moreover, most existing experiments have relied on highly stylized tasks, reducing the generality of their results. The present study narrows the gap between experimental control and realistic settings, reporting the results from an analysis of collective problem-solving in the context of a real-world citizen science task environment in which individuals with manipulated differences in task-relevant training collaborated on the Wildcam Gorongosa task, hosted by The Zooniverse. We find that dyads gradually improve in performance but do not experience a collective benefit compared to individuals in most situations; rather, the cost of team coordination to efficiency and speed is consistently larger than the leverage of having a partner, even if they are expertly trained. It is only in terms of accuracy in the most complex tasks that having an additional expert significantly improves performance upon that of non-experts. Our findings have important theoretical and applied implications for collective problem-solving: to improve efficiency, one could prioritize providing task-relevant training and relying on trained experts working alone over interaction and to improve accuracy, one could target the expertise of selectively trained individuals.


Via Complexity Digest
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Wound-healing waves | EurekAlert! Science News

Wound-healing waves | EurekAlert! Science News | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
propose a new model of information transfer in which cells utilize long-distance traveling waves in a self-organized manner to close a wound. T
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Working on the engine — using portfolio sensemaking to accelerate learning | by Regional Innovation Centre UNDP Asia-Pacific

Working on the engine — using portfolio sensemaking to accelerate learning | by Regional Innovation Centre UNDP Asia-Pacific | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
In their recent blog, Giulio, Alex and Bas outlined the goal of firmly embedding innovation within UNDP as part of reengineering the “mothership” to face future development challenges. As a first…
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Buzz Holling’s Resilient Universe

Buzz Holling’s Resilient Universe | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
The renowned ecologist taught us the virtues of variability and volatility. He died this summer.
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SYSTEMS CHANGE & DEEP EQUITY

SYSTEMS CHANGE & DEEP EQUITY | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
Pathways Toward SustainableImpact, Beyond “Eureka!,”Unawareness & Unwitting Harm An Interview with Sheryl Petty and Mark Leach Below is the introduction to the full Systems Change & Deep Eq…...
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The Difference between “Complicated” and “Complex” Matters (Yet Again) | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice

The Difference between “Complicated” and “Complex” Matters (Yet Again) | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
Ten years ago I posted my thoughts and ideas (many of which I borrowed) on the differences between complicated and complex organizations and why it mattered when it came to schools.The post turned out to be one of the most read of the nearly 1400 I have written since beginning this blog in 2009.…...
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From Emergency to Emergence

From Emergency to Emergence | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
The coronavirus outbreak is presenting us an opportunity to rethink our economic system—and remake it in an image we’d prefer.
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Teal Organization | Crisis Management | Adaptive Organization

Teal Organization | Crisis Management | Adaptive Organization | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
How does decentralized decision-making foster spontaneous creativity, adaptability, and humanity in a crisis?
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Introduction to the Modeling and Analysis of Complex Systems

Introduction to the Modeling and Analysis of Complex Systems | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
Keep up to date on Introduction to Modeling and Analysis of Complex Systems at http://bingweb.binghamton.edu/~sayama/textbook/! Introduction to the Modeling and Analysis of Complex Systems introduces students to mathematical/computational modeling and analysis developed in the emerging...
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Two Large-Scale Holacracy Experiments: Zappos.com vs. Bol.com

Two Large-Scale Holacracy Experiments: Zappos.com vs. Bol.com | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it
Both Zappos.com & Bol.com are online retailers. Around 2015, each launched transformation journeys inspired by Holacracy. While they share similarities, the journeys were quite different. What do these pioneers teach us, five years down the road?
june holleys insight:

Important lessons and contrasts.

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Strong ideas, loosely held

Strong ideas, loosely held | Self-organizing, Systems and Complexity | Scoop.it

One effect of the network era, and its pervasive digital connections, is that networks are replacing or subverting more traditional hierarchies of our institutions and markets. Three aspects of this effect are — 1) access to almost unlimited information, 2) the ability for almost anyone to self-publish, and 3) limitless opportunities for “ridiculously easy group-forming” as Seb Paquet described the effects of social media.

The desire to relate is what drives people to support global social movements on one hand, and to take shelter in tribal identity politics on the other. In politics, social media extend participation but also make information manipulation by small motivated groups much easier. Understanding this deep desire to relate to others should be foremost in mind in understanding human dynamics.


Via Edumorfosis, Ines Bieler
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