Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments"
4.7K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
onto Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments"
Scoop.it!

Understanding The Various Treatments For Sciatica | Call: 915-850-0900

Understanding The Various Treatments For Sciatica | Call: 915-850-0900 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Introduction

As part of the peripheral nervous system, the sciatic nerve is the largest nerve providing sensory and motor functions to the legs. The sciatic nerve is located in the lumbar regions of the spine that travels down to the leg. When the spine becomes injured or herniated, it can press on the sciatic nerve causing it to be irritated and cause throbbing, radiating pain that can cause symptoms like sciatica to invoke muscle weakness in the legs. Luckily, it’s rare for sciatica to affect both legs since it usually affects one leg at a time. However, various treatments provide relief for many people dealing with sciatica pain in their legs. Today’s article will focus on sciatica and how different treatments can help many individuals alleviate sciatica pain and reclaim their health and wellness. Referring patients to qualified and skilled providers who specialize in spinal decompression therapy. We guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is essential for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

What Is Sciatica?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feeling radiating, throbbing pain that runs down to your legs? How about muscle weakness in your thighs, legs, and feet? Does it hurt when moving around or shifting to relieve the pain? You could be suffering from sciatica, and research studies have mentioned that sciatica affects everyone, women, especially during their pregnancy, as it causes radiating leg pain and muscle disabilities in the lower regions of the body. Sciatica has a wide range of pain scales from short, sharp, shooting pain irritating to a burning, searing, throbbing pain that causes numbness and muscle weakness in the legs. Sciatica is usually caused by strenuous activities that require frequent lifting of heavy objects, which can cause the spine to over-twist and bend constantly. Additional information also mentioned that sciatica could be associated with other spinal disorders like spondylolisthesis, herniated discs, or muscle spasms that impact the spinal nerve and pressure it. This pressure causes the sciatic nerve to send pain signals to the brain and allows the inflammatory cytokines to irritate the sciatic nerve. Fortunately, various treatments help alleviate sciatica from causing more harm to the body and alleviate lower back pain and other chronic symptoms that affect the spine.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Dr. Alex Jimenez gives an insightful overview on understanding various treatments for sciatica for many individuals. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

No comment yet.
Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments"
At times the pain seems as if a scourge has befallen upon my back, hip, and leg, its victim reveals...... For this very reason, Dr. Alex Jimenez discusses sciatica, a common and frequently reported series of symptoms affecting a majority of the population. Sciatica pain can vary widely. Sciatica occurs when there is pressure or damage to the sciatic nerve, a nerve found in the lower back which runs down the back of each leg as it controls the muscles of the back of the knee and lower leg. It also provides sensation to the back of the thigh, part of the lower leg, and the sole of the foot. Dr. Jimenez explains how sciatica and its symptoms can be relieved through the use of chiropractic treatment. For more information, please feel free to contact us at (915) 850-0900 or text to call Dr. Jimenez personally at (915) 540-8444. http://bit.ly/chiropractorSciatica  Book Appointment Today: https://bit.ly/Book-Online-Appointment
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Massage Chair: Back Pain and Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Massage Chair: Back Pain and Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Many individuals deal with sciatic nerve discomfort and pain that radiates from the lower back down through the glutes, legs, and feet. It can affect anyone and be challenging to deal with because it can be sudden and unpredictable. A professional hands-on therapeutic massage can play a vital role in alleviating back and sciatic pain but is not always available. This is when a quality massage chair can provide pain relief and relaxation at home.

Sciatica

Not everyone who has sciatica will have the same symptoms. But common symptoms include:

 

  • Tingling, numbing sensations in the lower back and down the leg.
  • Electrical sensations running down the leg.
  • Lower back pain that spreads into the buttocks, thighs, calves, and feet.
  • Pain may be described as mild, dull, achy, and sharp.
  • Sneezing or coughing can increase the pain.
  • Weakness in the leg.

Massage Chair

A massage chair can assist with sciatic pain by soothing tense muscles and relieving the pressure on the surrounding tissues. When the back muscles are tense, they contract and compress down on the nerves, including the sciatic nerve. Massaging the tight muscles minimizes the pressure on the sciatic nerve and helps alleviate pain. Research has shown the main reasons why massage is beneficial:

Improves Circulation

  • Massaging the muscles increases blood flow.
  • Increasing blood circulation facilitates the absorption of nutrients into the muscles and tissues.
  • Increasing lymphatic circulation clears toxins out of the painful areas.
  • Revitalizes the area.

Decreases Tension and Improves Flexibility

  • Massaging helps loosen tight and strained muscles.
  • Percussive kneading and rolling allow muscles to relax and increase endorphin levels.
  • Endorphins are the body's natural pain killer chemicals.
  • Increased endorphin levels expedite recovery and decrease anxiety.

Features and Functions

Massage chairs have come a long way and vary in their capabilities, features, and functions.

Body Scanning

  • High-end massage chairs often include a body scan mode.
  • The chair has a built-in computer that scans the individual's body shape to deliver a customized massage to the different body areas.

Multiple Massage

  • Most massage chairs come with rollers and nodes to access the sore muscles.
  • Many chairs offer a variety of pre-programmed massages.
  • Higher-end programmable chairs provide kneading, reflexology, and Shiatsu, to name a few.
  • The massaging action is designed to help alleviate muscle discomfort.

Heated Massage

  • Many high-end chairs offer an optional heated seat and/or back.
  • Some chairs provide full-body infrared heat to relax the muscles.

Reclining Function

  • Most chairs feature multiple recline functions.
  • Zero-gravity recline is a popular option.
  • However, all recline options enhance relaxation.

Options

Choosing one will be based on specific needs and budget. Some tips to help figure out which is the most beneficial massage chair include:

Consult A Doctor

  • A doctor, spine specialist, or chiropractor can recommend the best type of massage chair for the individual's specific injury, condition, and/or disorder.
  • A doctor will inform the individual if a massage chair is a safe option for their sciatica pain if they have health conditions like high blood pressure or neuropathy.

Chair Objectives

  • Figure out what the chair will help with short and long-term before shopping.
  • For example, if the goal is to relieve sciatica and lower back tension, an L-Track massage chair can go further down the spine to the glutes and hamstrings.

Injury Medical DOC Spinal Decompression Table

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Cyganska, Anna, et al." Impact of Exercises and Chair Massage on Musculoskeletal Pain of Young Musicians" International journal of environmental research and public health vol. 17,14 5128. 16 Jul. 2020, doi:10.3390/ijerph17145128

 

de Souza, Talita Pavarini Borges et al."“The effectiveness of Chair Massage on Stress and Pain in Oncology" International journal of therapeutic massage & bodywork vol. 14,3 27-38. 2 Sep. 2021, doi:10.3822/ijtmb.v14i3.619

 

Hand, Mary et al." "Massage Chair Sessions: Favorable Effects on Ambulatory Cancer Center Nurse" Perceived Level of Stress, Blood Pressure, and Heart Rate" Clinical journal of oncology nursing vol. 23,4 (2019): 375-381. doi:10.1188/19.CJON.375-381

 

Kim, Seung-Kook, et al." "Clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of massage chair therapy versus basic physiotherapy in lower back pain patients: A randomized controlled trial." Medicine vol. 99,12 (2020): e19514. doi:10.1097/MD.0000000000019514

 

Kumar, Saravana, et al. "The effectiveness of massage therapy for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review of systematic reviews." International journal of general medicine vol. 6 733-41. 4 Sep. 2013, doi:10.2147/IJGM.S50243

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

A professional hands-on therapeutic massage is not always available. This is when a quality massage chair can provide pain relief at home. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Muscle Memory - Low Back Pain and Sciatica | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Muscle Memory - Low Back Pain and Sciatica | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

The lower back core muscles initiate and control movement and posture. Total body movements start at the pelvis and are carried out by the low back and abdominal muscles. These core muscles provide control and stability when moving. When the body is not moving, standing and sitting posture habits (healthy and unhealthy) develop based on how an individual controls/holds their pelvis posture. The lower back muscles are in constant demand for performing repetitive motions or forceful actions. The muscles become chronically tight and sore,  joints and nerves get compressed, and bones and connective tissue stay in a stressed state, causing intense pain and damage to the body's structure. These problems can result from muscle memory, the nervous system's operating procedure to make movements automatic.

Muscle Memory

The nervous system controls the movement and contraction in the muscles and constantly reinforces and learns new movement patterns to become more efficient through muscle memory. However, this learning process allows for the development of healthy muscle habits and unhealthy muscular habits. An example is sitting using a slouching posture. The nervous system will store that posture data and subconsciously contract the abdominal and pectoral muscles, so the slouched posture takes over. Because of the continual usage and compromised postures, various muscles start to tighten up. Individuals are typically not aware of the gradual tightening until stiffness, soreness, and pain sets in. Tight muscles pull the skeleton in awkward ways that cause body misalignments, causing:

 

 

Individuals develop unique muscle patterns and tension levels throughout the body due to repetitive daily activities, stress responses, injuries sustained, and physical activities. Muscle memory issues can contribute to chronic back pain and sciatica. Unhealthy muscle memory causes the muscles not to return to their natural state but to the awkward position and makes that the natural state. Healthy muscle memory leads to instant reflexes that make movements smooth and effortless.

 

Chiropractic will relieve back and sciatica pain by inducing deep muscle relaxation that releases endorphins. The soreness and tension will be massaged, and mechanical decompression if necessary. Massage and stretching will help retrain muscle and movement memory, along with exercises to reinforce the retraining.

Spinal Decompression Therapy

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, or licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Campbell, James N, and Richard A Meyer. "Mechanisms of neuropathic pain." Neuron vol. 52,1 (2006): 77-92. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2006.09.021

 

Wilder, David G et al. "Effect of spinal manipulation on sensorimotor functions in back pain patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial." Trials vol. 12 161. 28 Jun. 2011, doi:10.1186/1745-6215-12-161

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Back muscles can get tight and sore, and the joints and nerves get compressed, causing intense pain. These problems can result from muscle memory. For answers to any questions, you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Deep Gluteal Syndrome & Decompression Therapy | Call: 915-850-0900

Deep Gluteal Syndrome & Decompression Therapy | Call: 915-850-0900 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Introduction

The lower half of the body helps provide stability to the upper half of the body. The hips, legs, and feet have sensory and motor functions from the nerves part of the peripheral nervous system. These nerves are connected to the lumbar region of the spine that makes the hips rotate, the feet sense where it is going, and the legs move around freely. One of the nerves connected to the lumbar regions of the spine is the sciatic nerve. The sciatic nerve extends from the spinal cord’s lower lumbar region through the buttock muscle region and travels down to the legs. When unwanted symptoms start to affect the lower half of the body, it can cause the sciatic nerves to become trapped in the buttock muscle region and irritated, causing sciatica to develop. Today’s article will focus on the deep gluteal syndrome, how it affects the sciatic nerve, and how decompression treatments can help relieve trapped sciatic nerves. Referring patients to qualified and skilled providers who specialize in spinal decompression therapy. We guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is essential for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

What Is Deep Gluteal Syndrome?

Do you feel pain in your hips and buttock regions? How about stinging, burning pain that is causing leg pain? Do your buttock muscles gradually begin to feel numbness or spasms throughout the day? If you have been dealing with these symptoms, it could be deep gluteal syndrome. Research studies have defined deep gluteal syndrome as a presence of pain located in the buttock region that causes the surrounding muscles to press on the nerve roots and cause unwanted pain. When a person suffers from an accident like falling and landing on their butt, the muscles feel the effects of that fall and start to compress the sciatic nerve that is traveling down the leg and causes pain to the body’s lower extremities. Other studies have shown that deep gluteal syndrome factors can cause this condition to develop over time due to increased muscle tension that aggravates the sciatic nerve. Other causes of the deep gluteal syndrome can include prolonged sitting. The butt muscles start to pinch the sciatic nerves constantly, the muscles from the buttock start to feel tender to the touch, and abnormalities in the piriformis muscles can lead to the development of sciatica. 

 

How Does It Affect The Sciatic Nerve & Symptoms?

Since deep gluteal syndrome causes muscle tension in the buttock region, it can aggravate the sciatic nerve and causes sciatica-like symptoms in the legs. Research studies have mentioned that deep gluteal syndrome can cause a painful presence in the buttock muscles while trapping the sciatic nerve within the gluteal space, causing the sciatic nerve to become irritated. Since the sciatic nerve is located in the spinal cord and goes all the way to the legs, sciatica is presented whenever the lower half of the body is suffering from factors like herniated discs, piriformis syndrome, and even deep gluteal syndrome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of the symptoms that deep gluteal syndrome causes to the lower regions of the body are sciatica. Since the sciatic nerve is located in the lower back and runs across the butt and down to the legs, it can cause leg pain since the nerves are either trapped by the buttock muscles or irritated due to a compressed disc in the spine. Other symptoms that are caused by deep gluteal syndrome involve:

  • Muscle tenderness
  • Tingling sensations traveling down the legs
  • Pain becomes worse during light to moderate exercises
  • Muscle aches on the hips, lower back, and buttock

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Dr. Alex Jimenez gives an insight look at deep gluteal syndrome and how decompression therapy can help release trapped sciatic nerves. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Non-surgical Decompression Therapy Relief For Sciatic Radiculopathy | Call: 915-850-0900

Non-surgical Decompression Therapy Relief For Sciatic Radiculopathy | Call: 915-850-0900 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Introduction

Inside the body are countless nerves that intertwine with each other and are all spread out. These nerves are functioned to give motor and sensory function to the body that allows a person to feel, sense, touch, and move. As part of the peripheral system in the body, these nerves are connected to the spinal cord and spine as they branch out in the spinal columns and send signals to and forth to the brain. When the body suffers from an accident or an injury, the nerves send the pain signals to the brain allowing the immune system to go to the affected area and start healing the injury. Sometimes the body suffers from natural wear and tear and that causes pain to the nerves, making the body lose the sensory and motor functions that the nerves provide. This causes radiculopathy in the body and there are treatments that allow relief to reduce the effects of radiculopathy. Today’s article post will discuss the sciatic nerve and radiculopathy, its symptoms, and how decompression therapy can help individuals that are suffering from sciatic radiculopathy. Referring patients to qualified and skilled providers who specialize in spinal decompression therapy. We guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is essential for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

The Sciatic Nerve & Radiculopathy

Have you been experiencing pain traveling down to the lower extremities of your body? Does the pain feel hot to the touch? Is the pain a sharp, stabbing pain or a burning, searing pain in the sciatic nerve? If you have encountered these symptoms, these symptoms might be due to radiculopathy along the sciatic nerve. The sciatic nerve is part of the peripheral nervous system; its primary sensory and motor functions ensure that the legs move and stand in the body. When the body goes through natural aging, wear and tear, accidents and injuries, it can cause radicular pain along the spine while compressing the nerve roots, including the sciatic nerve. Research studies have shown that radicular pain along the sciatic nerve root can cause deficits in the lower extremities’ motor and sensory function. This radicular pain can cause many problems and conditions when not treated right away. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research studies have defined radiculopathy as one of the reasons that many people have been suffering from low back pain. Radicular pain is located along the spine in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar areas. When these areas are affected, it can severely damage the underlying nerve roots, thus causing the lower extremities to lose all sensory and motor functions. Additional information has found that sciatica is a type of radiculopathy that pinch the sciatic nerve causing sharp, radiating pain that travels from the lower back down to the legs. Depending on how severe the radicular pain is, it can affect the sciatic nerve over time and develop into sciatica. 

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Dr. Alex Jimenez gives an insightful overview of nonsurgical decompression relief for individuals that suffer from sciatic radiculopathy. if you have questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Improving Sciatic Nerve Injury With Decompression | Call: 915-850-0900

Improving Sciatic Nerve Injury With Decompression | Call: 915-850-0900 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Introduction

Throughout the entire body, the nerves that start from the brain in the central nervous system and branch out from the spine, allow the user to feel, sense, and move wherever it is going. These nerve roots allow many of us to send the information that we are experiencing to and forth in the brain. These nerves also help with our motor functions such as walking, sitting, standing, and running in any location that we are currently at.  When unforeseen circumstances like an injury to the body or accidents that start to affect the nerves, it can cause a variety of issues to occur and dampen the quality of life in a person. Fortunately, there are treatments that can help alleviate nerve injuries and reduce the pain that it is causing in each region of the body. Today’s article will look at spinal nerve injury, its symptoms, and how decompression therapy can help individuals that are suffering from sciatic nerve pain. Referring patients to qualified and skilled providers who specialize in spinal decompression therapy. We guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is essential for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

What Is Sciatic Nerve Injury?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you feel a throbbing, radiating pain that travels from the lower back to the back of the leg? Does the back of your leg feel tender to the touch? Or does it hurt to walk or run, even for a short distance? These symptoms are caused by sciatic nerve pain and can be excruciating for many people. As mentioned in research studies, the sciatic nerve in the body is considered the largest nerve that resides in the lower back and travels down the buttock area to the legs. The sciatic nerve is responsible for the motor function of the legs to move around. When the spine succumbs to injury, the compressed discs between the spinal joints crack and herniate out of the spine, aggravating the sciatic nerve by producing pain signals, known as neuropathy, to the brain and radiating down the leg, causing leg pain. Additional studies have found that sciatic neuropathy causes deficits in the sensory and motor function of the legs while also mimicking other neuro- and radiculopathies factors that affect the lower half of the body. When the sciatic nerve root is aggravated on either side of the legs, symptoms like sciatica will develop and cause excruciating pain.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Dr. Alex Jimenez gives an insightful view on how to improve sciatic nerve injury with decompression for many individuals. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

How Decompression Therapy Can Help With Leg Pain | Call: 915-850-0900

How Decompression Therapy Can Help With Leg Pain | Call: 915-850-0900 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Introduction

The body can bend, twist, turn, and move without pain, while the spine allows the body to be held upright. When the body gets injured, and the spine starts to feel pain from the ligaments, the nerve root, the spinal discs, and the spinal cord, it can cause either leg painback pain, or both depending on the severity. The pain can range from a dull, mild ache to a sudden, sharp shooting pain that can radiate from the leg to the feet. Luckily there are many treatments to help alleviate lumbar pain and can bring back a person’s quality of life. In this article, we will be looking at what leg pain is, its factors, and its symptoms, as well as how decompression can relieve leg pain for many individuals. By referring patients to qualified and skilled providers specializing in spinal decompression therapy. To that end, and when appropriate, we advise our patients to refer to our associated medical providers based on their examination. We find that education is the key to asking valuable questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

What Is Leg Pain?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ever wonder, “why are my legs aching so much?” or “my legs can’t stop twitching even when I am sitting down?” How about feeling a sharp pain from the buttock down to the back of the leg to the feet. This is known as leg pain, and research shows that leg pain can be intermittent or constant in the body. Not only that, but leg pain can have a range of sensations, from a dull ache to a throbbing, burning sensation that travels the leg itself. Now many causes can contribute to leg pain, and it usually starts in the lower back, the pelvis, or even the leg itself. Some of the common causes include:

  

The Symptoms & Factors Of Leg Pain

As stated earlier, one of the causes contributing to leg pain is low back pain. Research studies have noted that around 60% of individuals with low back pain have also suffered leg pain. When leg pain is associated with low back pain, it is known as radicular pain. Leg pain can also affect the spinal nerve root involvement, and other research studies have found that low back-related leg pain is one of the most common variations of low back pain and can contribute to sciatica. Some of the symptoms that individuals are experiencing with leg pain include:

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Dr. Jimenez gives an insightful view on how decompression therapy can help individuals that are dealing with leg pain. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Sciatic Nerve Decompression | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Sciatic Nerve Decompression | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Sciatica is experienced as lower back pain and pain that radiates down the back of the legs. It is pain caused by compression, irritation, or inflammation of the sciatic nerve. It is generally experienced on one side of the body. Body movements like twisting, bending, sitting, or responses like coughing and sneezing can worsen the pain. Individuals with sciatica also experience muscle weakness, numbness, tingling, or electrical shock-like sensations. Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic offer manual and motorized sciatic nerve decompression to stretch/realign the spine, release the compressed nerves, and relieve pain.

Sciatic Nerve Decompression

The spine consists of 23 spinal discs that are shock absorbers for the body during movement. Each disc consists of a soft inner core of a gel substance and a thick outer layer. Wear and tear of the spinal discs from aging, degenerative disc disease, repetitive physical activities like lifting and bending, obesity, and poor posture are some of the factors that can stress the spine, causing the thick outer layer of the spinal disc to crack/breakdown causing the soft inner core to leak out forming a bulging or herniated disc. This type of injury compresses, pinches, or irritates one or more nerve roots that form the sciatic nerve, triggering sciatica.

 

  • Spinal bone spurs.
  • Spinal stenosis or the narrowing of the spinal canal.
  • Spondylolisthesis, or the slipping or dislocation of the spinal vertebrae in the lower part of the spine.
  • Are also known sciatica causes.

Symptoms

Common compressed nerve symptoms include:

 

  • Pain or burning sensations radiating down the leg.
  • Because branches of the sciatic nerve extend from the lumbar spine through the buttocks and down the leg, pain, burning sensations or dull aching can present along the nerve's pathway if the nerve gets compressed or irritated.
  • Weakness in the affected leg.
  • When walking or moving the legs, the nerves transmit information to the brain, stimulating the muscles to react in specific ways.
  • A pinched sciatic nerve can cause interference with relaying signals, resulting in weakness.
  • Numbness.
  • The compression impedes blood circulation and nerve energy transmission.
  • Pins and needles sensations - paresthesia.
  • Like numbness, paresthesia sensations happen when a nerve is compressed or irritated.

Non-Surgical Sciatic Nerve Decompression

Spinal decompression therapy relieves pressure on the spine by pulling/stretching it in small increments. Non-surgical spinal decompression creates negative pressure within the discs. The negative pressure pulls or vacuums back the disc material that has protruded or herniated and an abundance of nutrients to activate the healing response. The chiropractor, physical therapist, or nurse uses motorized medical equipment with sensors linked to a computer-aided system to perform the procedure. The equipment is designed to adjust the pull force accordingly to prevent muscle resistance. The adjustable table also allows the spine to be stretched at different angles to target the upper or lower back.

 

The objective of spinal decompression treatment is to relieve the symptoms of sciatica or disc disorders and heal the injured disc. We utilize spinal decompression as an effective tool in treating a vast array of spinal conditions.

DRX9000 Non-Surgical Spinal Decompression

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, or licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Berry, James A et al. “A Review of Lumbar Radiculopathy, Diagnosis, and Treatment.” Cureus vol. 11,10 e5934. 17 Oct. 2019, doi:10.7759/cureus.5934

 

Davis D, Maini K, Vasudevan A. Sciatica. [Updated 2022 Feb 4]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK507908/

 

Giuffre BA, Jeanmonod R. Anatomy, Sciatic Nerve. [Updated 2021 Jul 29]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK482431/

 

National Institutes of Health. (2019.) “Sciatica.” https://medlineplus.gov/sciatica.html

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic offer manual and motorized sciatic nerve decompression to relieve pain. For answers to any questions, you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Hip Sprain | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Hip Sprain | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

The hips are highly active joints. Hip sprains are rare but do occur. A hip sprain is caused by tearing or stretching the ligaments that surround the hip and join the bones to each other. This is different from a hip strain, which is an injury to the muscles and is generally caused by over-use of the hip flexor muscles and tendons, causing them to tear.

 

Hip sprains usually happen after a fall or a sudden twisting motion, which can occur during sports or an accident.

Individuals involved in sports that require quick stops, body shifting, and sudden direction changes, like soccer, football, basketball, tennis, volleyball, etc., have an increased risk. 

 

Most hip sprains can be effectively treated with conservative treatments like self-massage, rest, ice, and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory medications. For more severe cases, physical therapy and chiropractic can treat the condition.

Hip Sprain Symptoms

  • Tenderness in the hip increases when lifting the thigh.
  • Cramping sensation/s in the muscles of the upper leg.
  • Swelling in the hip or thigh
  • Bruising in the hip or thigh.
  • Sudden pain in the hip or pelvis.
  • Sharp pain in the hip or pelvis.
  • Pain that worsens when walking, running, or stretching the hip muscles.
  • Loss of strength in the front of the groin.
  • Tugging or pulling sensation.
  • Limping.

Diagnosis

The doctor or chiropractor will:

 

  • Look into medical history.
  • Inquire about symptoms.
  • Inquire about activities that could cause symptoms.
  • Perform a physical examination.
  • Ask the individual to perform a variety of movements to determine what type of injury has been sustained.
  • Other conditions could cause radiating pain.
  • Pain in one or both hips might not have anything to do with the hips but a pinched nerve root in the lower back.
  • Sciatica can develop when certain nerve roots in the lower back are irritated or compressed, causing symptoms to travel down the sciatic nerve and radiate around the pelvis and leg.
  • X-rays can help rule out hip stress fractures, which can have similar symptoms.
  • MRI or CT scans are used to see if any soft tissue damage has occurred.

Hip Sprain Treatment

  • Treatment usually begins with over-the-counter pain medications and anti-inflammatories to reduce swelling and relieve pain.
  • Resting the hip will help prevent further damage.
  • Applying ice will help prevent tissue damage and reduce swelling.
  • It is recommended to use an ice pack several times a day for the first 48 hours after an injury.
  • Once the swelling goes down, a chiropractor and physical therapy team will create a personalized treatment plan that includes:
  • Adjustments.
  • Exercise therapy.
  • Posture training.
  • Stretching.
  • Massage.

Treatment/Rehabilitation Objectives

  • Reduce inflammation.
  • Relax muscle spasms.
  • Strengthen weakened muscles.
  • Improve joint mobility.

 

Individuals will be shown how to prevent the risk of sprains in the future. This includes:

 

  • Avoiding exercising when the body is tired
  • Wearing proper footwear and protective equipment
  • Warming up properly before exercise/physical activities.

Depending on the severity of the sprain, surgery could be the last resort to repair the ruptured or torn ligaments.

Body Composition

Realistic Goals

Not seeing results after putting in the work through exercise and diet can be frustrating. Setting realistic goals can help when results are not showing.

Realistic Fat Loss

  • Do not expect actual fat loss without being in a caloric deficit.
  • The body needs to use more energy than the amount of food/energy taken in; otherwise, excess energy/food gets stored, primarily as adipose tissue.
  • Total Daily Energy Expenditure or TDEE is necessary to set a realistic caloric deficit to achieve measurable fat loss.
  • There are caloric deficit variations, but most doctors, dieticians, trainers, and fitness experts agree that a caloric deficit of around 500 calories a day that equals to about 3,500 calories a week will result in a pound of fat loss per week.
  • One pound of fat a week lost might seem slow, but the one pound of fat is a real pound removed.
  • The long-term goal is not to fall back into unhealthy habits and develop and maintain new healthy ones.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Brantingham JW, Globe GA, Cassa TK, et al. A single-group pretest posttest design using full kinetic chain manipulative therapy with rehabilitation in the treatment of 18 patients with hip osteoarthritis. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapy 2012; 33(6): 445-57.

 

Kamali, Fahimeh and Esmaeil Shokri. The effect of two manipulative therapy techniques and their outcome in patients with the sacroiliac joint syndrome. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. 2012; 16: 29-35.

 

McMorland G, Suter E, Casha S, du Plessis SJ, Hurlbert RJ. Manipulation or microdiscectomy for sciatica? A prospective randomized clinical study. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics. 2010; 33(8): 576-584.

 

Tibor, Lisa M, and Jon K Sekiya. “Differential diagnosis of pain around the hip joint.” Arthroscopy: the journal of arthroscopic & related surgery: official publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association vol. 24,12 (2008): 1407-21. doi:10.1016/j.arthro.2008.06.019

 

Wedro, Benjamin. “Hip Pain: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment Information and Diagnosis-eMedicineHealth.” http://www.emedicinehealth.com/hip_pain/article_em.htm.

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

A hip sprain is caused by tearing or stretching the ligaments that surround the hip and join the bones to each other. For answers to any questions, you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Sciatic Nerve Injury | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Sciatic Nerve Injury | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Sciatic nerve injury happens from trauma to the nerve and can cause numbness, tingling, loss of muscle power, and pain. The traumatic experience can be a muscle spasm that pulls and/or pinches the sciatic nerve, force/pressure impact injury, over-stretching injury, or a laceration/cutting injury. A slipped disk, or herniated disk, is the most common cause of irritation on the sciatic nerve. A slipped disk occurs when one becomes slightly dislodged, pushing out from the spine. This places pressure/compression on the sciatic nerve.

Sciatic Nerve Injury Causes

Trauma

  • Hip dislocation
  • Acetabular fracture
  • Trauma to the lower back, buttocks, or leg from an automobile accident, sports injury, work injury.

Medical treatment causes:

  • Direct surgical trauma.
  • Total hip replacement surgery can cause nerve compression and stretch during the procedure, causing damage to the sciatic nerve resulting in dysfunction.
  • Faulty positioning during anesthesia.
  • Injection of neurotoxic substances.
  • Injection injuries via intramuscular injection in the gluteal region. This is a situation where there is a loss of movement and or lack of sensation at the affected lower extremity with or without pain.
  • Injection palsy can begin suddenly or hours following damage to the sciatic nerve.
  • A misplaced intramuscular injection at the gluteal region is the most common cause of injury. It is attributed to frequent injections or poor techniques resulting from inadequately trained or unqualified staff.
  • Tourniquet-Induced Sciatic Nerve Injury.
  • Dressings that are too tight.
  • Casts that impinge the nerve.
  • Faulty fitting orthotics.
  • Post radiation treatment can cause acute and delayed muscle damage.

Clinical Presentation Symptoms

The common symptoms are pain and abnormal walking gait. Other clinical symptoms include:

 

Medical History

  • Complaints of radiating pain in the leg, which follows a sensory nerve pattern.
  • Pain radiates below the knee, into the foot.
  • Complaints of low back pain, which is often less severe than leg pain.
  • Report of electrical, burning, numbing sensations.

Diagnosis

A detailed subjective and objective physical examination is necessary to figure out the severity of the sciatic nerve injury. Diagnostic studies include:

 

  • X rays
  • Electromyography
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Chiropractic and Physical Therapy Management

Conservative treatment is the first-line approach for managing a sciatic nerve injury.

Pain Management

Exercise and Stretches

  • Chiropractic and physical therapy exercises and stretches improve nerve regeneration after nerve damage.

Electrical Muscle Stimulation

  • TENS and Electroacupuncture have been shown to help enhance nerve regrowth.
  • Bio-laser stimulation can help with nerve nutrition and regeneration.

Joint or Soft Tissue mobilization

  • Helps to retain muscle, nerve, and soft tissue flexibility and prevent deformity.

Balance Training

  • Coordination, strength, and flexibility exercises help to restore balance.

Splinting

  • In the early stages after a sciatic nerve injury, bracing may be needed to prevent deformity and new injury or re-injury risks.
  • Ankle Foot Orthosis - AFO can help prevent foot drop, muscle damage, and falls risk.

Body Composition

Optimize Diet for Fat Loss

Individuals that want to lose fat need to create a calorie deficit. Individuals need to consistently eat less than they need for Total Daily Energy Expenditure - TDEEThe safest way to handle a caloric reduction is to reduce calorie intake in small doses like 200-300 calories, for example. After a week or two, perform a body composition analysis. If Fat Mass numbers begin to drop or not, adjust calorie needs accordingly. Restricting calories is the most common way, a deficit can also be created by increasing calorie needs through exercise.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Kline, D G et al. “Management and results of sciatic nerve injuries: a 24-year experience.” Journal of neurosurgery vol. 89,1 (1998): 13-23. doi:10.3171/jns.1998.89.1.0013

 

Schmalzried, TP et al. “Update on nerve palsy associated with total hip replacement.” Clinical Orthopedics and related research,344 (1997): 188-206.

 

Shim, Ho Yong et al. “Sciatic nerve injury caused by a stretching exercise in a trained dancer.” Annals of rehabilitation medicine vol. 37,6 (2013): 886-90. doi:10.5535/arm.2013.37.6.886

 

Suszyński, Krzysztof et al. “Physiotherapeutic techniques used in the management of patients with peripheral nerve injuries.” Neural regeneration research vol. 10,11 (2015): 1770-2. doi:10.4103/1673-5374.170299

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Sciatic nerve injury happens from trauma to the nerve and can cause numbness, tingling, loss of muscle power, and pain. For answers to any questions, you may have, please call Dr. Alexander Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Sciatica Causes: Genetics, Low Back Problems, Piriformis, Arthritis | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Sciatica Causes: Genetics, Low Back Problems, Piriformis, Arthritis | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Sciatica Causes: The sciatic nerve forms by the union of Lumbar4 to Sacral31 nerve roots and exits the pelvis through the greater sciatic foramen, below the piriformis muscle located deep in the buttocks. The nerve runs down the back of the thigh, into the leg, and ends in the foot. The sciatic nerve becomes inflamed, irritated, and/or mechanically compressed. Any type of pain and/or neurological symptom/s from the sciatic nerve is referred to as sciatica. Sciatica is a type of lumbar radiculopathy, which means that the pain originates from the low back and/or sacral nerve roots.

Sciatica Causes

Physical forces on the nerve can cause mechanical compression due to the following conditions:

Herniated Discs

  • A disc in the lower back can bulge or herniate, causing irritation and/or compression of a sciatic nerve root.

Foraminal Stenosis

  • Stenosis, the intervertebral opening through which the nerve roots travel, begins to narrow/close in, can compress or irritate the sciatic nerve.

Degeneration

  • Degenerative changes in the spine like the thickening of facet joint capsules and/or ligaments can compress the sciatic nerve.

Segmental Instability

  • Instability of a spinal vertebral segment that happens if one vertebra slips over the one beneath it - spondylolisthesis
  • Vertebral defects - spondylolysis
  • Complete dislocation of one or more vertebrae can compress the nerve root/s of the nerve.

Other Sciatica Causes

  • Tumors, cysts, infections, or abscesses in the lower spine or pelvic region can also cause sciatic nerve compression.

Chemical Inflammation

  • Chemical irritants can include hyaluronic acid and/or fibronectin/protein fragments that leak out of degenerated or herniated discs. These irritants can cause inflammation and/or irritation of the sciatic nerve.
  • Degenerated discs can cause nerve tissues to grow into the disc, penetrating the outer and inner layers of the disc, causing sciatica. Immune system responses can contribute to pain when exposed to disc fluid.
  • Substances such as glycosphingolipids/fats and neurofilaments /protein polymers secreted by the immune system are increased in individuals with sciatica. These substances are released from the reaction between nerve roots and exposed disc material, causing inflammation.

Job Occupation 

Individuals with specific jobs have an increased risk of developing sciatica. Examples include:

 

  • Truck drivers
  • Desk workers
  • Teachers
  • Warehouse workers
  • Machine workers
  • Plumbers
  • Electricians
  • Carpenters
  • Fitness trainers

 

Sitting and standing for long periods, using improper posture, constantly bending, twisting, reaching, and regularly lifting are risk factors for sciatica.

Piriformis Syndrome

Piriformis syndrome is a condition where the piriformis muscle swells and spasms from overuse or inflammation irritating the sciatic nerve that is right underneath. The nerve can get trapped in the muscle causing sciatica-like symptoms that include:

 

  • Pain follows the same pattern in the leg as a compressed sciatic nerve root.
  • Tingling
  • Numbness

 

Discomfort from piriformis syndrome feels similar to sciatica, but it is not caused by compressed sciatic nerve root. Piriformis pain comes from compression of the sciatic nerve near the piriformis muscle.

Genetic Sciatica Causes

Sciatica caused by degenerated and/or herniated discs can be genetic. Research has shown that certain genetic factors are more prevalent in individuals with back and spinal problems. These congenital disabilities can cause the discs to become weak and susceptible to external stress. With time the proteins in the disc break down, compromising the integrity and function.

Arthritis and Joint Issues

Arthritis or other inflammatory conditions around the hip joint can cause pain down the leg, similar to sciatica. This is referred pain that spreads out from the source and is not radicular nerve pain that originates in the nerve roots.

 

  • Conditions like sacroiliac joint dysfunction or sacroiliitis can cause sciatica-like pain that runs down the back of the thigh but usually ends before or at the knee.
  • The pain can be acute and debilitating, like sciatica but is caused by an abnormal motion or malalignment of the sacroiliac joint.

Body Composition

Normal Cholesterol Ranges

High cholesterol can lead to severe consequences when left untreated, but it can be difficult to spot with no noticeable warning signs. This is why it’s essential to monitor cholesterol levels with blood tests, especially if there is an increased risk. Example of normal cholesterol levels for adults 20 years of age or older:

 

  • Total cholesterol 125-200 mg/dL
  • LDL <100 mg/dL
  • HDL >40 mg/dL men, >50 mg/dL women

Lifestyle

  • Lack of physical activity contributes to high cholesterol levels.
  • Diets that mainly consist of processed foods and saturated fats increase the risk of high LDL levels.
  • Smoking can lower HDL levels.

Aging

  • Individual risk for developing high cholesterol tends to increase as the body advances in age. This is why it is recommended to have regular physicals and blood tests.

Genetics

  • Some individuals are more genetically predisposed to developing high cholesterol and heart disease.
  • Knowing family medical history can help predict whether it may become a problem.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Davis D, Maini K, Vasudevan A. Sciatica. [Updated 2021 Sep 2]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK507908/

 

Giuffre BA, Jeanmonod R. Anatomy, Sciatic Nerve. [Updated 2021 Jul 29]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK482431/

 

Hicks BL, Lam JC, Varacallo M. Piriformis Syndrome. [Updated 2021 Jul 18]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK448172/

 

Raj MA, Ampat G, Varacallo M. Sacroiliac Joint Pain. [Updated 2021 Aug 30]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK470299/

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Sciatica causes: The nerve becomes inflamed, irritated, and/or mechanically compressed. Physical forces on the nerve can cause compression. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Sciatic Nerve Branches | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Sciatic Nerve Branches | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

The sciatic nerve is formed through a combination of motor and sensory fibers based on the spinal nerves of the lower back L4 to S3, known as the lumbosacral plexus. It is the largest and longest nerve in the human body and about as wide as an adult thumb. It begins at the base of the spine, runs along the back of each leg, and ends at the foot supplying the areas with fresh blood and nutrients. There are sciatic nerve branches that consist of primary branches and smaller branches

Sciatic Nerve Branches

  • The nerve splits into two main branches near the back of the knee called the popliteal fossa.
  • This fossa is located slightly above the joint behind the knee.
  • The popliteal fossa is a diamond-shaped space that acts as the conduit for the blood vessels and nerves.

Primary branches

From the popliteal fossa:

 

  • The tibial nerve continues down the back of the calf to the heel and bottom of the foot.
  • The common peroneal nerve, aka common fibular nerve, travels sideways along the outer part of the knee to the outer border of the lower leg and foot.
  • Both nerves convert into small sensory nerves in the calf that supply the outer side of each foot.
  • These sensory nerves are called sural nerves.

Collateral branches

The sciatic nerve breaks off into smaller branches, known as collaterals, that include:

 

  • These are muscle branches that supply the muscles in the thigh, including the hamstring group and the adductor magnus muscles along the inner thigh.
  • Other small branches supply the leg and foot muscles.
  • Articular branches supply the back of the hip joint, the back and side of the knee joint.

 

The sciatic nerve does not supply structures in the buttocks; however, pain commonly radiates/spreads into this area when the nerve is impaired, impinged, and inflamed.

Blood Supply

The delivery of nutrients to the sciatic nerve is done through blood vessels that also contribute to the nerve's function. Any interruption of blood flow to the sciatic nerve can cause pain and dysfunction. The sciatic nerve and the sciatic nerve branches receive their blood supply from two sources that include:

 

  • The extrinsic system is made up of nearby arteries and veins.
  • The intrinsic system includes arteries and veins that run along the nerve and are embedded deep in a sheath known as the epineurium of connective tissue that envelops the nerve.
  • The intrinsic blood supply can be affected by conditions like diabetes, which can contribute to symptoms associated with diabetic neuropathy.
  • Both systems connect at various junction points.

Nerve Function

The combination of sensory and motor fibers that make up the sciatic nerve provides the essential functions in the lower limbs allowing the body to:

 

  • Stand
  • Walk
  • Run
  • Climb
  • Lift

 

A healthy sciatic nerve is well protected around the low back and buttock muscles where it starts, and it cannot be palpated or felt by touching or pressing on the area. When the nerve gets inflamed, injured, or pinched, the leg can feel stiff and inflexible when trying to move and can lead to pain, weakness, and tingling in the lower back, buttock, leg/s, and feet.

Anatomical Variations of the Nerve

Individuals can have variations in the anatomical structure of the sciatic nerve. These variations are considered normal, but they can increase the risk of developing sciatica brought on by impingement, entrapment, or irritation of the nerve root/s. Variations in sciatic nerve branches include:

 

  • The nerve divides above the piriformis muscle; one portion passes through the piriformis, with the other portion exiting the pelvis below the muscle. This is the most common variation.
  • The nerve divides above the piriformis muscle; one portion passes through the piriformis, with the other portion exiting the pelvis above the muscle.
  • The nerve divides above the piriformis, with one portion traveling in front while the other travels behind it.
  • Undivided sciatic nerve exits through the piriformis muscle.
  • Undivided sciatic nerve exits from behind the top part of the piriformis.
  • Around 10% of individuals have a nerve that divides above the popliteal fossa and does not merge but courses down in two separate branches.

 

The sciatic nerve and the sciatic nerve branches are significant components of the body. It supplies motor functions to move the legs and feet and provides sensory functions along the nerve path. Keeping the sciatic nerve healthy is key in helping to prevent back and spinal issues. Chiropractic can help realign the sciatic nerve and educate on maintaining the nerve's health.

Body Composition

Fitness Motivation

New workout routine

Individuals that don't feel like returning to previous workout routines are recommended to try out other fitness options. If the gym isn't cutting it or there is burnout with the current routine, switch things up. This can include:

 

  • Virtual group classes.
  • 1-on-1 personal training.
  • Outdoor activities.
  • All are valid options to explore if in a rut with the current routine.
  • The important thing is to find what works for you.

Allow the body to rest

Individuals may want to push it to the limit to get back into shape, but rest days are essential for healthy muscle development and improved performance.

 

  • Noticing the body is more sore and exhausted after a workout is an indication that the body needs rest. This also includes:
  • Maintaining proper hydration.
  • Stretching out the muscles regularly.
  • Taking days off from exercising are necessary to:
  • Prevent muscle fatigue.
  • Reduce the risk of injury.
  • Allow for adequate muscle recovery.

Long term commitment is key

It can be discouraging to commit to a workout schedule only to notice minor changes to strength and fitness.

 

  • However, small improvements do accumulate over time.
  • Small increases over time can have a huge impact on overall strength and fitness.
  • Keep the bigger picture in mind to remain positive.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Davis D, Vasudevan A. Sciatica. [Updated 2019 Feb 28]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2019 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK507908/

 

Barral J, Croibier A. Manual Therapy for the Peripheral Nerves. Elsevier Health Sciences; 2007.

 

Ryan MM, Jones HR Jr. Mononeuropathies. In: Neuromuscular Disorders of Infancy, Childhood, and Adolescence. Elsevier; 2015:243-273. doi:10.1016/b978-0-12-417044-5.00014-7

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Sciatic nerve branches consist of primary branches and smaller branches. Chiropractic can realign the nerve and maintain the nerve's health. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Pain Running Down The Leg | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Pain Running Down The Leg | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

A common symptom of sciatica is radiating/spreading pain running down the leg. However, the leg pain could be something to do with the blood vessels. If the pain travels from the low back to the hip, through the buttocks, down the leg, and into the foot, then more than likely it is sciatica. However, sciatica is just one condition that causes leg pain; other causes of leg pain include:

 

  • Bone spurs
  • Herniated disc
  • Arthritis
  • All can irritate the sciatic nerve causing sciatica.

 

The vascular system, also called the circulatory system, comprises the vessels that circulate blood and lymph throughout the body. Problems with the vascular system are a less common cause of leg pain but can be severe. Therefore, it is vital to learn to tell the difference.

Deep Vein Thrombosis

Deep vein thrombosis - DVT happens when a blood clot forms in a deep vein in the body and not the superficial veins just under the skin. The legs' deep veins are susceptible to clotting. The formation of a clot can happen:

 

  • After surgery
  • From an accident
  • When recovering, bed resting and not moving.
  • When the body is in the same position for a long time with little to no movement, like a long plane ride.
  • On long plane rides, try to get up and walk around every hour. If unable to walk, do three sets of 20 reps of heel-to-toe exercises every hour.

 

Deep vein thrombosis can cause leg pain or swelling but can also present without causing any symptoms. Other risk factors include:

 

Blood Clots

Three main factors place individuals at risk for blood clots. They are:

Hypercoagulability

  • This is when the blood is more prone to clotting. This can occur through:
  • Genetics
  • Medications
  • Pregnancy
  • Kidney disease
  • Trauma

Venous stasis

  • This is when blood flow circulation is slower than it should be. This usually happens from:
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Heart conditions
  • Obesity
  • Smoking
  • Clotting disorders

Vascular Trauma

  • Blunt or penetrating injury to the blood vessel and/or its walls.

 

Pain running down the leg from a blood clot feels like:

 

  • Tightness
  • Cramping soreness
  • Throbbing
  • Possible warmth
  • Swelling.

 

Blood clots and sciatica are reported to feel relatively different. The pain from a blood clot does not spread out and does not extend from or to the back. Sciatica does not cause swelling, redness, and warmth. If a doctor suspects a blood clot is causing the pain, they will order an ultrasound to confirm the diagnosis. If it is deep vein thrombosis, blood thinners could be recommended for three to six months.

 

  • A doctor may recommend aspirin, which can help in the prevention of blood clots.
  • Compression stockings/socks could also be recommended.
  • In some cases, the clot may have to be surgically removed.

Vascular Conditions and Pain Running Down The Leg

Other blood vessel conditions that can cause individuals to believe they have sciatica include:

Peripheral artery disease - PAD

This often presents in individuals with diabetes or who smoke. It causes pain in the calf area but does not radiate throughout the leg. The pain usually presents with physical effort movement. If the pain occurs when at rest, this could be a serious medical emergency. Peripheral artery disease is a chronic condition that can worsen if lifestyle changes are not made to reduce risk factors.

Acute limb ischemia

This condition can cause leg pain, but not the same as sciatica. What happens is the leg is not receiving blood, causing:

 

  • Intense pain in the extremity
  • Change in the color of the skin
  • Numbness
  • Weakness
  • Loss of a pulse

 

This vascular condition is a medical emergency and requires immediate treatment.

Acute compartment syndrome

This can happen after some kind of trauma to the leg.

 

  • The pain is acute, with the leg swelling up and a building up of tight pressure.
  • It usually affects the lower part of the leg.
  • This condition can also cause:
  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Visible swelling
  • Bruising

 

It is considered a medical emergency and needs to be treated quickly to avoid complications.

Varicose veins

Varicose veins can cause some pain running down the leg and/or aching, but the discomfort is not as intense. Treatment has come a long way, is less invasive, and includes:

 

  • Compression stockings, including prescription socks/stockings
  • Laser treatments
  • Minimally invasive procedures
  • Not staying on the feet too much
  • Elevating the legs
  • Maintaining an ideal weight can help

Vascular Disorder Prevention

Healthy lifestyle habits are recommended to keep the vascular system operating correctly. This includes:

 

Sciatica Treatment

If it is sciatica, fortunately, most cases go away on their own, but if treatment is needed, it is recommended to start with conservative treatments such as:

 

  • Chiropractic
  • Physical therapy
  • Anti-inflammatory medication
  • Muscle relaxants
  • Corticosteroid injections
  • In severe cases, surgery like a microdiscectomy or laminectomy will be performed to relieve pressure on the sciatic nerve.

Body Composition

 

Why might blood pressure be different when measuring on each arm?

The heart sits just to the left of the midline in the chest cavity. The aorta is the largest blood vessel in the body. It leaves through the left side of the heart and transports blood to a network of blood vessels that branch out, supplying the body with oxygen and nutrients. The arteries that branch off the aorta and go to the left and right sides of the body are different.

 

On the right, the brachiocephalic trunk comes off the aorta and splits into the right common carotid artery and right subclavian arteryThe left common carotid and left subclavian arteries branch directly off the aorta. The differences mean that the risk for arterial thrombosis is not the same for the right and left subclavian arteries. Arterial thrombosis causes the blood vessels to become stiff, causing obstruction over time and is more likely to happen in the left subclavian than in the right. The difference in arterial branching affects blood pressure measurements on the left and right arms. The blood vessels are surrounded by:

 

  • Muscle
  • Fat
  • Connective tissue

 

When muscles place pressure on the blood vessels around the heart, it can cause short-term turbulence changes that can affect blood pressure.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

American Heart Association. Atherosclerosis and cholesterol. https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/cholesterol/about-cholesterol/atherosclerosis

 

American Heart Association. What is excessive blood clotting (Hypercoagulation?) https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/venous-thromboembolism/what-is-excessive-blood-clotting-hypercoagulation

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. What is venous thromboembolism? https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dvt/facts.html

 

Cleveland Clinic. Compartment syndrome. https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/15315-compartment-syndrome

 

Mayo Clinic. Deep vein thrombosis overview. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/deep-vein-thrombosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20352557

 

Mayo Clinic. Sciatica. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sciatica/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20377441

 

Mayo Clinic. Sciatica overview. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sciatica/symptoms-causes/syc-20377435

 

Mayo Clinic. Varicose veins. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/varicose-veins/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20350649

 

Obara, Hideaki et al. “Acute Limb Ischemia.” Annals of vascular diseases vol. 11,4 (2018): 443-448. doi:10.3400/avd.ra.18-00074

 

ScienceDirect. (n.d.) “Virchow’s Triad.” https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/virchows-triad

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

A common symptom of sciatica is spreading pain running down the leg. However, the leg pain could be something to do with the blood vessels. For answers to any questions, you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Hamstring Syndrome, Sciatica, and Chiropractic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Hamstring Syndrome, Sciatica, and Chiropractic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

The hamstring muscles are three muscles in the back of the thigh. The sciatic nerve goes through or around and down the legs into the feet. Hamstring syndrome is a condition where injury or spasm apply pressure compressing the sciatic nerve.

 

  • The nerve can become pinched between the hamstring muscles and the pelvic bone or the band of tissue that connects the hamstring muscles.
  • This can cause discomfort, tingling, numbness, and pain down the back of the leg, hip, buttock, and into the foot.
  • Pain can present when sitting down or stretching the hamstrings.
  • Pain reduces when lying flat on the back.

Hamstring syndrome

This condition could be the result of wearing and tearing to the back muscles and hamstring muscles. It is often seen in individuals that play sports involving running, kicking, and/or jumping. But it can happen to anyone from some awkward leg motion causing the muscles to spasm that can twist around the sciatic nerve or pull on it, causing various symptoms. A doctor or chiropractor will diagnose the condition by examining the symptoms, physical activities, and leg. Most individuals diagnosed with hamstring syndrome report discomfort or pain where they sit down. The pain gradually worsens when performing physical activities, regularly sitting, and when flexing the knee. Hamstring syndrome usually gets better within a few weeks with proper rest and home care. A doctor or chiropractor will recommend exercises and stretches to strengthen the muscles.

Home care

  • Ask the doctor or chiropractor about taking over-the-counter pain medication:
  • Acetaminophen - Tylenol
  • Ibuprofen - Advil, Motrin
  • Naproxen - Aleve
  • Read and follow all label instructions.
  • Use an ice pack on the pain area for 10 to 20 minutes at a time.
  • Try to do this every 1 to 2 hours for 3 days or until the swelling goes down.
  • After 2 or 3 days, if the swelling is gone, apply heat.
  • Use a warm water bottle, heating pad, or warm cloth over the area.
  • Avoid sitting if possible, unless it feels better than standing.
  • Take short walks to keep the muscles stretched.
  • Don't do anything that causes symptoms to worsen.
  • Return to normal physical activities slowly.
  • If symptoms do not improve, then contact a doctor or chiropractor.

Body Composition

 

Short-term effects of coffee

  • Coffee increases short-term blood pressure slightly.
  • Caffeine falls under stimulants, or substances that excite the systems throughout the body.
  • Ingesting caffeine can cause the body to experience increased excitement, especially in the cardiovascular system.
  • This excitement causes the heart rate and blood pressure to rise
  • Then it lowers back down to baseline levels for most healthy individuals.
  • It is recommended to drink coffee in moderation, safe for individuals with pre-existing cardiovascular conditions.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

de Ridder, Roel et al. “Neurodynamic sliders promote flexibility in tight hamstring syndrome.” European journal of sports science vol. 20,7 (2020): 973-980. doi:10.1080/17461391.2019.1675770

 

Matsuda, Dean K. “Editorial Commentary: Proximal Hamstring Syndrome: Another Pain in the Buttock.” Arthroscopy: the journal of arthroscopic & related surgery: official publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association vol. 34,1 (2018): 122-125. doi:10.1016/j.arthro.2017.08.260

 

Park, Jung Wee et al. “Deep gluteal syndrome as a cause of posterior hip pain and sciatica-like pain.” The bone & joint journal vol. 102-B,5 (2020): 556-567. doi:10.1302/0301-620X.102B5.BJJ-2019-1212.R1

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Hamstring syndrome is a condition where injury or spasm apply pressure compressing the sciatic nerve. Chiropractic treatment can help. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Function Restoration Chiropractor: Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Function Restoration Chiropractor: Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

The sciatic nerve is the longest in the body and is the central nerve in the leg. A critical nerve that comes off the spine runs through the pelvis, into the buttocks, down the back of each thigh, and finally into the feet. It is a mixed nerve meaning it is made up of both motor/movement) and sensory/sensation fibers. The nerves merge with the spinal nerve roots before they enter the spinal cord, where the sensory information travels to and from the brain. If the nerve is inflamed, compressed, twisted, damaged, or injured, this can negatively affect the muscles' function, leading to chronic pain conditions. Injury Medical  Function Restoration Chiropractors will do precisely that for the sciatic nerve and the rest of the body. 

Nerve Roots and Branches

Different nerve roots make up the sciatic nerve, with two starting in the lower back and three at the bottom of the spine or sacrum. At the  knees, the nerve splits into two branches:

 

  • The peroneal nerve runs from the knee's outer part to the foot's outer part and splits into two main branches below the knee.
  • The tibial nerve goes down the back of the calf, extending to the heel and sole.

 

There are smaller branches at the:

 

  • Hips
  • Inner thighs
  • Calves
  • Feet

Sciatic Nerve Function

The sciatic nerve's purpose serves motor functions by assisting the muscles in the legs and feet to move, walk, run, and stand. And for the sensory function of feeling sensations in the legs and feet includes pain, numbness, burning, and electrical sensations. 

Motor Functions

The nerve provides motor functions that power movement to the muscles that move the thighs, legs, and feet. Essential motor functions:

Hip adduction

  • Bringing the thighs together inward toward the body

Knee flexion

  • Bending the knee.

Inversion of the foot

  • Movement of the foot inward to the body.

Eversion of the foot

  • Movement of the foot away/outward from the body

Dorsiflexion of the foot

  • Pointing the foot up.

Plantarflexion

  • Pointing the foot down.

Flexion of toes

  • Pointing the toes down.

Extension of toes

  • Pointing the toes up.

 

Motor function signs of sciatic nerve problems include difficulty or inability to walk, bend the leg, and/or stand on tiptoe or the heel.

Sensory Functions

The nerve provides sensation to the different areas; when the nerve is injured, the corresponding area may feel unique/abnormal sensations with differing degrees of numbness, pins-and-needles, and pain. Commonly affected areas include:

 

  • Front, back, and outside the thigh.
  • Front, back, and outside the lower leg.
  • The top and outer side of the foot.
  • Bottom of the foot.
  • Between the toes.

 

Like motor function disruption, sensory impairment is determined by where the problems are occurring.

Function Restoration Chiropractor

Affected, reduced, and inhibited motor and sensory functions can lead to muscle weakness, chronic pain, and permanent nerve damage. Function restoration chiropractor and physical therapeutic massage can help manage nerve compression and irritation. Spinal manipulations restore misaligned vertebral discs taking the pressure off the nerve relieving the pain, and regaining nerve signal flow and mobility. Chiropractic will induce deep muscle relaxation to stop muscle spasms, release tension, soothe the nerve, release endorphins, and restore sciatic nerve function.

Spinal Decompression

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Bouche, P. “Compression and entrapment neuropathies.” Handbook of clinical neurology vol. 115 (2013): 311-66. doi:10.1016/B978-0-444-52902-2.00019-9

 

Cook, Chad E et al. “Risk factors for first-time incidence sciatica: a systematic review.” Physiotherapy research international: the journal for researchers and clinicians in physical therapy vol. 19,2 (2014): 65-78. doi:10.1002/pri.1572

 

Giuffre BA, Jeanmonod R. Anatomy, Sciatic Nerve. [Updated 2021 Jul 29]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK482431/

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Injury Medical  Function Restoration Chiropractors will do precisely that for the sciatic nerve and the rest of the body. For answers to any questions, you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Viscerosomatic Reflex: Distressed Internal Organs Can Cause Back Pain | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Viscerosomatic Reflex: Distressed Internal Organs Can Cause Back Pain | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Low back and mid-back pain could be caused by abdominal or pelvic organ distress/irritation or infection that an individual doesn't know about. This could be a viscerosomatic reflex. This can be the case when there is no back injury, muscle strain, or sprain that would coincide with back aching and soreness. Identifying the symptoms and diagnosing the underlying cause is the first step in getting ultimate pain relief.

The Organs

Inflammation and other issues with any internal organs in the central, abdominal, or pelvic region can produce low back pain. These include the following:

 

  • Heart
  • Lungs
  • Stomach
  • Intestines
  • Liver
  • Gallbladder

 

Viscerosomatic reflex pain can also be felt in a completely different body part than where the organ is located. This can cause an individual to think something is wrong in that body region when there is not.

Kidneys

  • The kidneys help remove liquid waste from the body.
  • Urine that contains more chemical substances than what can be diluted can cause kidney stones to form and sharp pain in the side and the lower back.
  • Kidney stones can also cause difficulty urinating and blood to show up in the urine.
  • kidney infection can result in mid-low back pain and fever.

Pancreas

  • The pancreas plays a vital role in digestion and blood sugar regulation.
  • Pancreatitis is inflammation that can cause severe and disabling pain that starts in the upper abdomen and radiates to the low back.

Appendix

Large Intestine

  • Inflammation of the large intestine/colon and/or ulcerative colitis can also cause:
  • Low back pain.
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Rectal pain.

Visceral Pain

Visceral pain is different as it can be harder to pinpoint a source and feels like a dull aching or tightening pressure.‌ The pain originates in the organs of the respiratory system, stomach, or pelvis that is often described as a dull ache but is also described as:

 

Visceral pain has distinguishing characteristics:

 

  • The pain originates in the middle of the body but can be felt in other areas.
  • The pain can be scattered, and difficult to locate a definitive source.
  • The affected area or other body regions can become sensitive.
  • It can accompany other symptoms like nausea, vomiting, sweating, or heart palpitations.
  • Psychological symptoms like depression can begin to present.

Chiropractic Care

Chiropractic focuses on healing the musculoskeletal system of aches and pain, muscle stiffness, and/or chronic conditions that complement traditional medical care. Adjustments can correct the body's alignment and how the body physically functions. A chiropractor will use manual or mechanical decompression techniques to realign the spine. This will release the muscle, tendon, ligament, and nerve tension, bringing pain relief, and improving nervous system function, and viscerosomatic reflex. Treatments include:

Adjustments

  • Will gently realign the joints to decrease pain and increase range of motion.

Soft-tissue therapy

  • Will relax tight muscles, relieve spasms, and release tension in the surrounding connective tissues.

Exercises and stretches

  • Will restore and maintain joint stability and mobility.

Joint bracing and Kinesio taping

  • Will support sprained joints or muscles as the healing process continues.

Integrative medicine expert referrals

  • Experts will guide individuals on diet and nutrition to reduce inflammation and promote healthy eating for overall health.

DRX9000 Low Back Pain, Sciatica, Herniated Disc

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, or licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Bath M, Owens J. Physiology, Viscerosomatic Reflexes. [Updated 2022 May 8]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK559218/

 

Beal, M C. "Viscerosomatic reflexes: a review." The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association vol. 85,12 (1985): 786-801.

 

Lefebvre R, Peterson D, Haas M. Evidence-Based Practice and Chiropractic Care. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3716373/) J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med. 2012;18(1):75-79. Accessed 4/25/2022.

 

Sikandar, Shafaq, and Anthony H Dickenson. "Visceral pain: the ins and outs, the ups and downs." Current opinion in supportive and palliative care vol. 6,1 (2012): 17-26. doi:10.1097/SPC.0b013e32834f6ec9

 

Zhou, QiQi, and G Nicholas Verne. "New insights into visceral hypersensitivity--clinical implications in IBS." Nature reviews. Gastroenterology & hepatology vol. 8,6 (2011): 349-55. doi:10.1038/nrgastro.2011.83

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Low back and mid-back pain could be caused by abdominal or pelvic organ distress/irritation or infection that is a viscerosomatic reflex. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Piriformis Syndrome & Spinal Decompression Therapy | Call: 915-850-0900

Piriformis Syndrome & Spinal Decompression Therapy | Call: 915-850-0900 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Introduction

The sciatic nerve is considered the largest in the lower half of the body that helps control sensory and motor functions of the legs. As part of the nervous system, the sciatic nerve resides in the lumbar region of the spine, traveling down to the legs and feet while succumbing to injuries and unwanted factors. When there are injuries or unwanted symptoms that start to affect the lumbar regions of the spine like herniation or a slipped disc, it can press on the sciatic nerve causing sharp, searing pain that can radiate down to the legs and feet. This type of pain can lead to sciatica and dampen a person’s mood if not treated right away. Luckily, there are treatments available for reducing sciatic nerve pain and other issues that affect the body’s lower extremities. Today’s article focuses on a condition that can cause sciatica known as piriformis syndrome, its symptoms, and how decompression therapy can help many people alleviate the sciatic nerve from piriformis syndrome. Referring patients to qualified and skilled providers who specialize in spinal decompression therapy. We guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is essential for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

What Is Piriformis Syndrome?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you feel muscle spasms occur in your lower back or buttock? How about radiating pain that is traveling down the legs? Do the muscles in the lower body regions feel tender and weak to the touch? Experiencing these symptoms mean that you are suffering from piriformis syndrome. Research studies have defined piriformis syndrome as a condition in which the piriformis muscles in the buttocks region irritate the nearby sciatic nerve, causing it to be trapped. As the sciatic nerve becomes trapped in the piriformis muscle, it can cause sciatica pain-like symptoms that run down the leg. Additional research studies mentioned that since sciatica is a musculoskeletal pain disorder associated with piriformis syndrome, the compressed, irritated sciatic nerve root causes the individual to suffer from painful symptoms that are causing the piriformis muscle to tense up. Piriformis syndrome can affect the sciatic nerve root with or without spinal disorders like herniationstenosis, or slipped discs.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Dr. Alex Jimenez gives an insightful overview of piriformis syndrome and spinal decompression therapy for many individuals. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Understanding The Various Treatments For Sciatica | Call: 915-850-0900

Understanding The Various Treatments For Sciatica | Call: 915-850-0900 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Introduction

As part of the peripheral nervous system, the sciatic nerve is the largest nerve providing sensory and motor functions to the legs. The sciatic nerve is located in the lumbar regions of the spine that travels down to the leg. When the spine becomes injured or herniated, it can press on the sciatic nerve causing it to be irritated and cause throbbing, radiating pain that can cause symptoms like sciatica to invoke muscle weakness in the legs. Luckily, it’s rare for sciatica to affect both legs since it usually affects one leg at a time. However, various treatments provide relief for many people dealing with sciatica pain in their legs. Today’s article will focus on sciatica and how different treatments can help many individuals alleviate sciatica pain and reclaim their health and wellness. Referring patients to qualified and skilled providers who specialize in spinal decompression therapy. We guide our patients by referring to our associated medical providers based on their examination when it’s appropriate. We find that education is essential for asking insightful questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

What Is Sciatica?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feeling radiating, throbbing pain that runs down to your legs? How about muscle weakness in your thighs, legs, and feet? Does it hurt when moving around or shifting to relieve the pain? You could be suffering from sciatica, and research studies have mentioned that sciatica affects everyone, women, especially during their pregnancy, as it causes radiating leg pain and muscle disabilities in the lower regions of the body. Sciatica has a wide range of pain scales from short, sharp, shooting pain irritating to a burning, searing, throbbing pain that causes numbness and muscle weakness in the legs. Sciatica is usually caused by strenuous activities that require frequent lifting of heavy objects, which can cause the spine to over-twist and bend constantly. Additional information also mentioned that sciatica could be associated with other spinal disorders like spondylolisthesis, herniated discs, or muscle spasms that impact the spinal nerve and pressure it. This pressure causes the sciatic nerve to send pain signals to the brain and allows the inflammatory cytokines to irritate the sciatic nerve. Fortunately, various treatments help alleviate sciatica from causing more harm to the body and alleviate lower back pain and other chronic symptoms that affect the spine.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Dr. Alex Jimenez gives an insightful overview on understanding various treatments for sciatica for many individuals. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

How The Sciatic Nerve Benefits From Decompression | Call: 915-850-0900

How The Sciatic Nerve Benefits From Decompression | Call: 915-850-0900 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Introduction

The central nervous system in the body controls every muscle, tissue, organ, and nerve all over the entire structure. Since the nervous system in the body contains two main parts that keep the body functioning: the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system, these two systems work hand in hand as the central nervous system is composed of the brain and the spinal cord. In contrast, the peripheral nervous system is composed of all the nerves branched out from the spinal cord and extended throughout the entire body. One of these nerves is the sciatic nerve, and when it gets irritated, it can send hot, burning pain from the lower back down to the feet. Luckily, non-surgical treatments like decompression can help alleviate sciatic nerve pain for many suffering individuals. For today’s article, we will be discussing the sciatic nerve, what happens when it gets affected and how decompression therapy can help alleviate sciatic nerve pain. By referring patients to qualified and skilled providers specializing in spinal decompression therapy. To that end, and when appropriate, we advise our patients to refer to our associated medical providers based on their examination. We find that education is the key to asking valuable questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

What Is The Sciatic Nerve?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you feeling a searing, burning pain traveling from your buttocks to your feet? Has this pain felt uncomfortable when you try to stretch it out? Or does this pain hinders your ability to walk around to relieve the symptoms? It could be due to your sciatic nerve becoming irritated. Research shows that the sciatic nerve is the largest in the human body, originating from the lower back and traveling down to the feet. This nerve is part of the peripheral nervous system and is an important nerve that allows the legs to function like generally walking, running, and even standing so the body doesn’t fall over, as research shows. The sciatic nerve in the body provides two functions for the legs: motor function, which makes the leg’s muscles move from one place to another, and sensory function, which helps the person feel the sensations on their feet. When there are factors that cause the sciatic nerve to become irritated, it can lead to unwanted pain that can affect either side of the legs causing sciatica to form.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Dr. Alex Jimenez gives an insightful view on how the sciatic nerve in the body can benefit from decompression. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

The Outcome Of Sciatica After Decompression Therapy | Call: 915-850-0900

The Outcome Of Sciatica After Decompression Therapy | Call: 915-850-0900 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Introduction

The spine makes sure that the body is staying upright while making sure that it stands, twists, bends, and turns without feeling any sort of pain. However, as the body begins to naturally age, so does the spine as the spinal discs begin to start wear and tear causing unwanted back issues that will affect a person’s quality of life. Luckily there are treatments that help alleviate back pain issues and can help restore the spine back to its original function. In this article, we will be taking a look at what is sciatica, the symptoms it causes to a person, and how decompression therapy can help alleviate sciatica symptoms. By referring patients to qualified and skilled providers specializing in spinal decompression therapy. To that end, and when appropriate, we advise our patients to refer to our associated medical providers based on their examination. We find that education is the key to asking valuable questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

What Is Sciatica?

Since the spine is encompassed by ligaments, the spinal cord, soft tissues, and trillions of nerves spread out throughout the entire body, these nerves ensure that the sensations are being felt when a person is feeling something they are touching or feeling impacted on. When the body begins to feel pain and starts to affect the nerves, it can send a sharp shooting pain that can cause a person to feel weakness in the leg muscles, known as sciatica. Research studies have shown that sciatica radiates pain along the sciatic nerve that travels down from the lower back to the leg. Sciatica usually occurs when the spine is suffering from a herniated disc, and that affected disc is touching the sciatic nerve causing sharp shooting pain down the leg.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other research studies have found that when individuals describe how sciatica pain feels, there are many different ways to express it depending on the cause and how severe the pain is. Sometimes the pain would often be described as sharp, shooting pain that goes down on one leg or as excruciating burning pain that either comes or goes or even may be constant. Sciatica can also come suddenly or gradually on the leg when the sciatic nerve has been pinched. 

 

 

What Are The Symptoms?

Research studies have shown that sciatica symptoms can range from being infrequent and irritating to severe and debilitating. Since the sciatic nerve root is compressed or pinched, the symptoms can affect the specific spinal nerve root originating from the sciatic nerve. Some of the common symptoms that are caused by sciatica usually involve one leg at a time and are seen as:

  • Pain that is shooting down the leg
  • Numbness or tingling sensation that is felt in the back of the leg
  • Muscle weakness that is in the leg and foot
  • Posture change can alleviate or aggravate the pain

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Dr. Jimenez gives an insightful look at the outcome of sciatica after decompression therapy for individuals. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Elderly Sciatica | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Elderly Sciatica | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

As individual bodies age, the nerves and muscles begin to degenerate, especially in the lower spinal region. This can cause sciatic pain and muscle weakness. Elderly sciatica is very common as the nerves and muscles have gone through a lot. Bending, lifting, carrying, reaching, twisting, and natural wearing and tearing make the sciatic nerve and surrounding muscles prone to injury. For overweight seniors, the risk of developing sciatica is higher.

Elderly Sciatica

The main reason for elderly sciatica is that as the body ages, the discs/cartilage between the vertebrae/bones in the spine dry out, losing their cushioning ability, which can lead to the bones shifting out of place more easily, rubbing against each other, and compressing nerves. On average, the body loses about 1 centimeter in height every ten years after 40.

Risk Factors

Diabetes

  • Diabetes affects the entire body.
  • Not keeping blood sugar in check can cause widespread symptoms that affect the nerves and organs.
  • Individuals with diabetes have an increased risk of developing sciatica and other nerve-damaging disorders.

Genetics

  • If spinal conditions are part of family medical history, there is an increased risk of developing sciatica.
  • Many spinal disorders can cause sciatica, and many spinal diseases are genetic.
  • For example, degenerative disc disorder and spinal stenosis are genetic conditions that can cause sciatica.

Controllable Risk Factors

Physical Activity

  • Sedentary and highly active lifestyles can cause sciatica.
  • Individuals who are highly sedentary have a greater risk of developing elderly sciatica.
  • Individuals who are highly active and do heavy lifting are also at risk because the activity increases the risk for a back injury.

Weight

  • The more overweight an individual is, the more at risk for developing sciatica.
  • The extra weight pushes on the spine and causes it to compress.
  • As the spine compresses, it can rub against the nerves causing irritation or pinch the nerves causing numbness, tingling, stinging, and pain.

Menopause

  • Menopause can lead to bone loss, causing nerve irritation and nerve damage.
  • If going or have gone through menopause, then it is essential to talk to a doctor about bone loss.
  • Individuals may need to start taking calcium or vitamin D supplements to keep their bones healthy.

Chiropractic

  • With chiropractic, elderly individuals can attain better quality sleep, improved mood, and increased energy levels.
  • A chiropractic physical therapy team can develop a specialized/customized treatment plan for preventive and palliative care.

Body Composition

Sarcopenia

Sarcopenia affects the elderly population's mortality, cognitive function, and quality of life. As the elderly population is living longer, preservation of lean mass becomes an integral part of maintaining an individual's independence. Loss of muscle in the arms and legs is linked to decreased mobility, increased risk of falls, and prolonged hospital stays. Falls and fractures often result in a cycle of muscle deterioration. InBody can help track body composition changes and help to minimize muscle wasting and risk of impaired mobility.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Aggarwal, Sameer, and Nityanand. “Calcium and vitamin D in postmenopausal women.” Indian journal of endocrinology and metabolism vol. 17,Suppl 3 (2013): S618-20. doi:10.4103/2230-8210.123549

 

Dougherty, Paul E et al. “The role of chiropractic care in older adults.” Chiropractic & manual therapies vol. 20,1 3. 21 Feb. 2012, doi:10.1186/2045-709X-20-3

 

Ferreira, Manuela L, and Andrew McLachlan. “The Challenges of Treating Sciatica Pain in Older Adults.” Drugs & aging vol. 33,11 (2016): 779-785. doi:10.1007/s40266-016-0404-z

 

Kherad, Mehrsa et al. “Risk factors for low back pain and sciatica in elderly men-the MrOS Sweden study.” Age and aging vol. 46,1 (2017): 64-71. doi:10.1093/ageing/afw152

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Elderly sciatica is very common as the nerves and muscles begin to degenerate, especially in the lower spine region. For answers to any questions, you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Sciatica Motor Vehicle Crash | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Sciatica Motor Vehicle Crash | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Sciatica motor vehicle crash. After an automobile crash/accident, symptoms of pain and discomfort can immediately follow the force of impact, indicating an injury. Many injuries and symptoms appear right away, like:

 

  • Pain from high-impact trauma and cuts.
  • Bone fractures.
  • Dislocations.
  • Neck whiplash.
  • Back pain.

 

The sciatic nerve is the largest in the body, and any damage can cause pain in one or both sides of the body. Pressure and compression on the nerves, ligaments, and muscles accompanied by weakness or numbness in the lower back, legs, or feet could cause delayed sciatica symptoms hours, days, even weeks later. It is critical to meet with a doctor and auto accident chiropractor after any type of accident, large or small, to develop a thorough personalized treatment plan.

Sciatica Motor Vehicle Crash

Sciatica can be brought on by a pinched nerve, which is often the result of the spine shifting out of place, causing herniation and compression on the sciatic nerve. The trauma from a motor vehicle accident can cause the spinal discs to be knocked out of place, rupture, and leak out, irritating the surrounding tissue and nerve endings. Back injuries are among the most common forms of damage/injury resulting from a motor vehicle accident/crash that can lead to sciatica. Broken and/or fractured vertebral, hip, or pelvis bone fragments can compress the sciatic nerve. Even when the initial result of the impact does not result in sciatica, over time, an untreated back injury could lead to sciatica symptoms.

Symptoms

Motor vehicle crashes often activate or aggravate pre-existing conditions like asymptomatic degenerative disc disease, affecting the sciatic nerve causing discomfort and pain. Common symptoms include:

 

  • Mild discomfort or achiness.
  • Tingling sensations from the lower back and down the back of the leg.
  • Weakness, numbness, or difficulty moving the leg and foot.
  • Inability to bend the foot upward at the ankle- known as foot drop.
  • Constant pain in one side of the buttocks or leg.
  • Sharp pain that makes it difficult to stand up and walk
  • Difficulty sitting.
  • Burning or tingling in one leg can worsen when sitting.
  • Intense pain.
  • Sharp burning and/or what feels like shooting electricity pain.

Diagnosis

A spine doctor and chiropractor will use diagnostic imaging tools like X-rays, and CT scans to see the scope of the injured area.

 

  • An X-ray will show a detailed image of the spine and affected bones in the area.
  • A CT scan will include a 3D image that shows the surrounding musculature, tissues, and nerves that could be damaged/injured.

Treatment

The doctor and chiropractor will then develop an appropriate and personalized treatment plan that could utilize various methods and techniques.

 

  • Chiropractic is commonly the first treatment to realign the spine and relieve pressure on the nerve.
  • A pain management specialist or physical therapist will be brought in for rehabilitation/recovery as adjustments progress.
  • Orthopedists and neurologists may be brought in for less conservative treatment in more severe cases, including surgical options.
  • Other treatments can include steroid injections or anti-inflammatory medicines to relieve nerve pressure.

Body Composition

Injury Rehabilitation Phase

Current in-clinic methods of measuring the composition of an injured body are indirect, while medically advanced techniques limit the frequency of testing. InBody provides cost-effective, comprehensive, and timely measurements that identify areas of weakness from damage, injury, or recent surgery and develop a customized rehabilitation program to improve functional status.

 

During the rehabilitation phase, increased sedentary behavior and/or immobilization causes muscle loss in the injured or operated region. By independently evaluating lean mass in each segment of the arms, legs, and torso, a chiropractor or physical therapist gathers baseline information on the body segments with restricted mobility.

 

InBody can help provide further insight into an individual’s body composition to analyze long-term health risks and develop a personalized exercise intervention to improve overall health and reduce health risks. This provides beneficial information for identifying potential imbalances related to muscle loss post-injury/surgery that can be targeted and improved. Identifying these imbalances allows the therapists to increase functional fitness and mobility, helping the individual reduce the risk of re-injury or new injuries.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Defouilloux, B et al. “A propos de trois observations chez des polytraumatisées de la route présentag une fracture du bassin associée à des signes neurologiques” [Apropos of 3 cases of multiple traffic injuries presenting pelvic fractures associated with neurologic signs]. Journal de radiologie, d'electrologie, et de medecine nucleaire vol. 48,8 (1967): 505-6.

 

Noble, J et al. “Analysis of upper and lower extremity peripheral nerve injuries in a population of patients with multiple injuries.” The Journal of trauma vol. 45,1 (1998): 116-22. doi:10.1097/00005373-199807000-00025

 

Walsh, K et al. “Risk of low back pain in people admitted to hospital for traffic accidents and falls.” Journal of epidemiology and community health vol. 46,3 (1992): 231-3. doi:10.1136/jech.46.3.231

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Sciatica motor vehicle crash. After an auto accident, symptoms of pain and discomfort can immediately follow the force of impact. For answers to any questions, you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Pelvic Floor Pain and Back Pain | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Pelvic Floor Pain and Back Pain | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

The pelvic floor is essentially the spine, and when pain presents, it can be mistaken for back pain. However, these two conditions are frequently linked. The National Institutes of Health- NIH reported that a quarter of women are impacted by pelvic floor disorders and up to 16% of men. The pelvic floor is made up of muscles. If the muscles begin to spasm, they can spread pain upwards and even downwards. This is where the misdiagnosis of lower back pain comes in.

The Pelvic Floor

The pelvic floor is comprised of muscles and connective tissue, known as fascia. The muscles and fascia intertwine, creating a support system for the pelvic organs. The pelvic floor muscles act as a spring system that supports the organs. When downward pressure is applied, and the spring system is working correctly, they push back up to support the muscles. These muscles create the base known as the core. The core muscles support the abdomen, diaphragm, and back muscles, supporting the spine. This is why back, pelvic pain is prevalent as these muscles are interconnected.

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction and Back Pain

If there is pelvic floor dysfunction, there is an inability to control the muscles. There can be too much or insufficient tension, resulting in urinary incontinence or inability to complete bowel movements. It can also be mistaken for back pain or contributes to pelvic and low back pain. The core muscles support the torso and promote stabilization during movement. If they are not working correctly, the torso and pelvis become unstable. The SI - sacroiliac joints linked with the pelvis and the lower spine can begin to present with posterior pelvic and back pain.

Symptoms

Dysfunction can present in several ways, including:

 

Causes of Dysfunction

Causes of dysfunction include:

 

  • Weakness of the muscles or tight muscles.
  • Vaginal dryness by a lack of estrogen during menopause.
  • Tight inner thigh muscles.
  • Back pain itself can cause dysfunction.

 

Women make up the majority of cases that result from:

 

  • Pregnancy
  • Childbirth
  • Endometriosis - a condition in which uterine tissue grows outside the uterus.

 

Men can also develop problems. As a man's body ages, prostate problems can cause urinary leakage and frequency problems. It can develop from activities like bicycling. The seat can compress the pudendal nerve, causing pain and dysfunction.

Retraining the Muscles

The dysfunction can be helped by reactivating and strengthening the pelvic and core musclesTraining the pelvic floor and the core muscles will help boost support for the spine and alleviate discomfort and pain. First, it is recommended to get a physical evaluation by a chiropractor or physical therapist to determine if the pelvic floor muscles are too tight or weak. The objective is to improve the strength of the pelvic floor muscles or relax them if they are too tight. A chiropractor and physical therapist can work on the muscles, educate on stretches, exercises, nutrition, and offer additional help and support.

Body Composition

Muscle Adaptation

The point of resistance training is to get the muscles to function more effectively. It begins with the contractile proteins that control muscle shortening and lengthening. Resistance exercise can cause some of the proteins to get pulled apart. The stress the muscles experience is the stimulus for the muscles to rebuild bigger, stronger, or more powerful. After resistance exercise, the muscle synthesizes proteins helped by nutritional stimuli and protein consumption. Satellite cells also activate to help build up the broken-down muscle. Resistance exercise causes activation.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Cleveland Clinic. (2020). "Pelvic Floor Dysfunction." https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/14459-pelvic-floor-dysfunction

 

National Institutes of Health. (September 2008) "Roughly One-Quarter of U.S. Women Affected by Pelvic Floor Disorders" https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/roughly-one-quarter-us-women-affected-pelvic-floor-disorders

 

Smith, Christopher P. "Male chronic pelvic pain: An update." Indian journal of urology: IJU: journal of the Urological Society of India vol. 32,1 (2016): 34-9. doi:10.4103/0970-1591.173105

 

World Health Organization. (2013) "Low back pain" https://www.who.int/medicines/areas/priority_medicines/Ch6_24LBP.pdf

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

The pelvic floor is essentially the spine, and when pain presents, it can be mistaken for back pain. The two conditions are frequently linked. For answers to any questions, you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Discussing About Sciatica With Dr. Ruja | El Paso, TX | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Discussing About Sciatica With Dr. Ruja | El Paso, TX | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

 Dr. Alex Jimenez and Dr. Mario Ruja discuss what sciatica does to the body and how it affects a person’s overall health and wellness.

 

Chiropractors and Sciatica Syndrome Expose

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

In today's podcast, Dr. Alex Jimenez discusses with Dr. Ruja what sciatica is and how it can affect a person's overall wellbeing. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Understanding Sciatica Syndromes | El Paso, TX | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Understanding Sciatica Syndromes | El Paso, TX | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Dr. Alex Jimenez, health coach Kenna Vaughn, Truide Torres, biochemist Alexander Jimenez, and Astrid Ornelas discuss how sciatica can be caused by a variety of health issues that result in the compression or impingement of the sciatic nerve.

 

Treating Severe and Complex Sciatica Syndromes

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

In today's podcast, Dr. Alex Jimenez and the crew discuss how the compression of the sciatic nerve causes a variety of problems. For answers to any questions, you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Alex Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Multiple Sclerosis, Sciatica, and Nerve Pain | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Multiple Sclerosis, Sciatica, and Nerve Pain | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Multiple sclerosis and sciatica can exist side by side or have overlapping symptoms. The sciatic nerve begins at the lower back, then through the hips into the buttocks, and separates into both legs into the feet. Sciatica is a type of pain caused by a compressed/pinched or damaged/injured sciatic nerve. The sensation radiates across the nerve with frequency and severity at varying levels, depending on the individual's body position and/or movement. Individuals with multiple sclerosis can also experience sciatica, believing it's their multiple sclerosis. Neuropathic pain is a common symptom in multiple sclerosis or MS. It is caused by injury or damage to the nerves of the central nervous system and can cause burning, or sharp, stabbing sensations.

Multiple Sclerosis and Sciatic Nerve Pain Difference

MS is an autoimmune disorder where the immune system attacks the protective layer around nerve fibers known as myelin. This affects the central nervous system pathways that regulate feeling and sensation in the body. It can cause painful sensations that include:

 

  • Muscle spasms
  • Burning, tingling, or aching in the lower legs
  • Electrical shock-like sensations travel from the back toward the legs.
  • Migraines
  • The painful sensations result from the damaged nerve fibers creating interference in the brain's neural pathways.

Sciatica works differently

An autoimmune response does not damage the sciatic nerve's pathway, but an added stress/pressure compresses the sciatic nerve. The pain is usually caused by a quick, jerking, twisting, bending, reaching motion that pinches or twists the nerve. Herniated discs and bone spurs are another common cause, along with being overweight can place intense pressure on the sciatic nerve. The critical difference is that multiple sclerosis causes the central nervous system's signaling pathways to malfunction.

MS and Sciatica

Most individuals, around 40%, will at some point experience some form of sciatica symptoms. This is from age, and all the wear and tear the low back goes through daily. This is why it's not unusual for individuals with MS to experience sciatica as well. MS can cause body changes that affect activity levels.

 

  • Decreased mobility can lead to sitting for extended periods that can strain the muscles, tendons, and ligaments, causing sciatica.
  • There is evidence that the lesions that present from MS can extend to the sciatic nerve.
  • One study compared 36 individuals with MS to 35 individuals that don't have it.
  • All of the participants underwent magnetic resonance neurography to obtain high-resolution nerve images.
  • The research found that those with MS had slightly more lesions on the sciatic nerve than those without MS.

Sciatica Care

It can be challenging to figure out the types of pain being experienced. Sciatica travels down the length of the nerve uniquely and is often felt in only one leg. The pain, tingling, numbness, electrical sensations can present only in the lower back, the buttock, the back of the leg, hamstring, calf, and foot, or in a combination of all the areas. Treatments for sciatica depend on the severity. They include:

 

  • Chiropractic
  • Physical therapy
  • Posture exercises
  • Lifestyle adjustments
  • Physical activity and exercise
  • Weight loss
  • Cold and hot packs
  • Acupuncture
  • Over-the-counter pain relievers
  • Medications - anti-inflammatories, muscle relaxants, tricyclic antidepressants, and antiseizure medications.
  • Steroid injections - corticosteroids
  • Surgery is a last resort reserved for severe cases that did not improve with other treatments and therapies.

 

It can be easy to mistake sciatica as a symptom or related condition of multiple sclerosis. Chiropractic can help alleviate sciatica, and although treatment cannot directly treat MS or its symptoms, it can relieve pain and discomfort.

Body Composition

 

Diabetic Nephropathy

Diabetic nephropathy or diabetic kidney disease is the result of mismanaged diabetes. Kidney failure is a severe medical emergency and can be fatal if not treated. Chronic low kidney function results in:

 

  • Fluid retention in the body.
  • Inability to filter out metabolites and waste from the blood.
  • Increased risk of infections.

 

Common symptoms of diabetic kidney disease include:

Increased blood pressure

  • This is the result of increased stress on the body.
  • The kidneys can no longer filter out all the metabolites and excess fluid needed to stabilize the blood pressure.

Proteinuria or protein in the urine

  • Chronic kidney damage results in the protein being excreted through urine.

Fatigue

  • Poor kidney function affects every organ in the body.
  • The organs have to work harder to compensate, leading to fatigue and low energy.

Lower extremity edema

  • Fluid retention usually presents in the lower extremities.
  • Puffy, swollen ankles and legs may appear shiny or waxy.
  • This is common in individuals that have severe diabetic nephropathy.

Shortness of breath

  • As the fluid builds up in the body, additional weight can get stored on and around the lungs.
  • This can make breathing very difficult when lying down or when engaged in physical activity.

Impaired cognition

  • Metabolites in the blood can cause brain damage when not filtered properly.
  • Memory loss
  • Mood changes
  • Loss of consciousness

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Jende JME, et al. (2017). Peripheral nerve involvement in multiple sclerosis: Demonstration by magnetic resonance neurography. DOI:
10.1002/ana.25068

 

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2019). Sciatica.
mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sciatica/symptoms-causes/syc-20377435

 

Murphy KL, et al. (2017). Chapter 4: Neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis—current therapeutic intervention and future treatment perspectives.
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK470151/

 

Pain and itching. (n.d.).
nationalmssociety.org/Symptoms-Diagnosis/MS-Symptoms/Pain

 

Samson K. (2017). In the pipeline-multiple sclerosis neurography, MRI reveals peripheral nerve lesions in MS patients. DOI:
10.1097/01.NT.0000527861.27137.b0

 

Sciatica: Of all the nerves. (2016).
health.harvard.edu/pain/sciatica-of-all-the-nerve

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Mistaking sciatica as a symptom or related condition of multiple sclerosis. Chiropractic can help relieve MS pain and discomfort. For answers to any questions, you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

No comment yet.