Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's
47 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Eclectic Technology
onto Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's
Scoop.it!

Common Core: Evaluating The Credibility of Digital Sources

Common Core: Evaluating The Credibility of Digital Sources | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it
Students today are hyper connected to information, but do they know how to research? Nope.

Via Beth Dichter
Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 7, 2013 11:15 PM

Do your students know how to research, to evaluate websites? The Common Core states that college and career ready students should be able to (quoted from the standards):
* Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

* Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.

* Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

In this post Caitlin Tucker provides a link to a Google form to use with students to demonstrate "their ability to analyze the credibility of resources."

She also includes a "silent screencast" that shows the process of making a copy of the form for you to use.

 

Jaime Parker's curator insight, July 10, 2013 2:22 PM

I have a friend who teaches English courses at the college level and this is her biggest complaint. She says that the students simply do not know how to research. They don't know how to use databases or how to evaluate websites which seems so crazy to me. I'm not sure why these skills aren't being taught or integrated into every content area. Perhaps too much time is being spent preparing students for standardized testing.

 

Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, July 10, 2013 7:07 PM

What to expect when librarians are being cut everywhere or stretched so thin to covel 4 schools in one week?

 

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Common Core in Action: Why Collaboration and Communication Matter | Edutopia.org

Common Core in Action: Why Collaboration and Communication Matter | Edutopia.org | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

When students graduate from high school, there is a collection of important (or core) skills we want them to possess. That's where the Common Core College and Career Readiness Anchor standards (CCRA) come in. With 32 anchor standards in total in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language, these anchor standards are generalized and quite broad. However, you can find more specific skills for teaching each of the anchor standards embedded within the grade-level Common Core state standards (CCSS).

 

So what we teachers need to know is that the authors of the Common Core believe the CCRA are skills each seventeen- or eighteen-year old should have if they are to be prepared for work and/or university upon secondary graduation. That said, the rest of this blog post is devoted to the following speaking and listening anchor standard:

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

 

What is expected in this speaking and listening anchor standard? By the time students graduate, they will need to be able to talk in a productive way about all kinds of things with all kinds of people while also being inclusive, articulate, and convincing of the importance and value of their individual ideas and stances.

 

Let's think about how this looks in the real world: In work, we do this everyday; in university, we probably do it less yet it's becoming more common. Group work, collaborative teams, planning partners -- all these are seen in working settings and in many college classrooms.

 

So, how do we prepare children for this?

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

The coming Common Core meltdown | WashPost.com

The coming Common Core meltdown | WashPost.com | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

In the following post, veteran educator Stan Karp explains why the problems surrounding the implementation of the Common Core are less about the substance of the standards and more about the context in which they were introduced. Karp taught English and journalism in Paterson, N.J., for 30 years and is an editor of Rethinking Schools magazine, where this appeared.

 

Stan Karp's Blog--The trouble with the Common Core is not primarily what is in these standards or what’s been left out, although that’s certainly at issue.


The bigger problem is the role the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) are playing in the larger dynamics of current school reform and education politics.


Today everything about the Common Core, even the brand name—the Common Core State Standards—is contested because these standards were created as an instrument of contested policy.

 

They have become part of a larger political project to remake public education in ways that go well beyond slogans about making sure every student graduates “college and career ready,” however that may be defined this year.

 

We’re talking about implementing new national standards and tests for every school and district in the country in the wake of dramatic changes in the national and state context for education reform.

 

These changes include:

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from CCSS News Curated by Core2Class
Scoop.it!

Common Core 'architect' deals blow to opponents with SAT revamp, say critics

Common Core 'architect' deals blow to opponents with SAT revamp, say critics | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it
The “architect” of the recent changes to the SAT’s is also known as the “Architect” of Common Core and critics feel that the recently announced changes will pave the way for forcing local school districts to change their curriculum after all.

Via Deb Gardner
Nicole Nicos insight:

There has been already a lot of talk about the SAT changing soon the way they do there testing that people already have an issue with. Now a lot of people believe that the changes go hand in hand with the integration of the common core standards. Whether the testing changes to become something that all students understand or if there still seems to be a separation of the elite is yet to be seen.

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

At the Core of Common Core: Fostering Academic Language in Every Lesson for Every Student (#CoreMatters)

At the Core of Common Core:  Fostering Academic Language in Every Lesson for Every Student (#CoreMatters) | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

The following blog post is another in the Alliance’s “Core of the Matter” blog series.


"The Common Core State Standards require students to think more than ever.  But to think and describe this thinking, a student needs strong language skills.  This language is often called “academic language,” though its features vary widely across subject areas, texts, and classrooms.   Like fish in water, most of us rarely recognize the fact that almost any cognitive act involves language.  We have worked with a wide range of educators who are striving to meet the many language needs of English learners in this era of new standards. And in this work we have come across several of what we call “under-realized principles.”


Via Mel Riddile
Nicole Nicos insight:

This discusses how common core will strengthen people's oral speaking especially those of ESL students. Unfortunately, a lot of students do not learn enough vocabulary words as they need to, to function in society. Some never learn and some learn to late, some repeat words never truly understanding it's meaning. Common core wants to focus on the idea of emphasizing the importance of not only understanding oral language but for one to embrace the language with their own notion.

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Learning FileMaker
Scoop.it!

Common Core on the Go | FileMaker iOS Demo Solutions

Common Core on the Go | FileMaker iOS Demo Solutions | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it
Database management with FileMaker Pro. Organize projects, tasks, and more. Download a trial.

Via Didier Daglinckx
Didier Daglinckx's curator insight, February 23, 2013 8:43 AM

Common Core on the Go is an easy to use, powerful iPad solution designed to help educators track student progress toward the national Common Core standards.


Also look at the intro video http://goo.gl/oJH9d

Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

The infliction of Common Core | Martinsburg Journal

"You think Obamacare is bad? The implementation of the Common Core is far worse."

 

Randi Weingarten,

American Federation of Teachers

 

In an attempt to understand the concept of the Common Core Initiative, I've listened to lectures on the topic, spoken to educators, and have done some online research. The information I've gotten is often contradictory and, in many cases, I believe, intentionally confusing. The more I dig, the more confused I get. While I am easily confused, I'm beginning to see a pattern.

 

According to Wikipedia, Common Core State Standards Initiative is an educational program initiated by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers using grant money from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Its stated purpose is to develop consistent standards of education across the country from kindergarten through 12th grade in the specific areas of Mathematics and Language Arts.

 

The objective is for students throughout the nation to progress at the same rate in these two areas of study as they move from kindergarten through 12th grade. On completion of high school, all students should be at about the same educational level in these two areas and thus be better able to transition on to college. Colleges will be better able to formulate curriculums in these areas knowing that their incoming students will have roughly the same background knowledge.

 

Currently, 46 states and the District of Columbia have adopted the CCSS standards to one degree or another. Its developers claim that it will not be taxpayer-funded and will not be tied to the federal government.

 

My conclusions follows.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Cut to the Core: Resource Selection and the Common Core | PublishersWeekly.com

Cut to the Core: Resource Selection and the Common Core | PublishersWeekly.com | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

We have Common Core aligned resources!


New Common Core updates!


Are you struggling with the Core? We can help!


If you are a librarian working in almost any sector of the information literacy field, you have probably received e-mails or promotional materials with some variation of the subject lines above.

 

The rollout of the Common Core standards may be mired in controversy, but the education materials marketplace is booming. According to recent stats from the AAP, sales for print and digital instructional materials in schools for 2013 were up 7% over the previous year, a percentage increase not seen in a decade, due in part to the new standards.

 

But are the Common Core standards really driving new materials purchases, and if so, how? We wanted to find out, so we distributed a survey on collection development and the Common Core to school librarians across the country via the popular Library ListServ LM_NET, and via Twitter. So far, early results show that school librarians are not swayed in their purchasing by a “Common Core Aligned” label slapped onto a book or splashed across a digital resource.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Reading Incomprehension – Common Core Standards in Action

Reading Incomprehension – Common Core Standards in Action | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it
You would think a former teacher and English major with a master’s degree in early childhood education could help her 7-year-old granddaughter do her first grade reading homework packet. Think again. Last week I spent a few days taking care of my grandkids in Indiana and was really stumped by a first grade assignment. My... Read more »

Via Charles Tiayon
Charles Tiayon's curator insight, March 27, 2014 8:01 PM

You would think a former teacher and English major with a master’s degree in early childhood education could help her 7-year-old granddaughter do her first grade reading homework packet. Think again. Last week I spent a few days taking care of my grandkids in Indiana and was really stumped by a first grade assignment.


Reading when not in school


My granddaughter read a non-fiction passage about the moon from her McGraw-Hill reader, Wonders. The homework was a series of reading comprehension questions laid out in boxes labeled “cause” and “effect.” The boxes were too small for the handwriting of a left-handed 7-year-old, with no lines to anchor her printed responses. She had to shorten her answers to fit the boxes.

When I tried to see if she truly comprehended the reading about why the moon waxes and wanes and how astronauts landed on the moon, she admonished me. “No Grandma,” she said. “We just look for a sentence in the book and copy it exactly.” I can assure you no reading comprehension took place.

If there is one issue that unites members of the Tea Party and Progressives, it is dislike of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) that are part of thealso disliked Race to the Top. On March 24, 2014, Indiana Governor Mike Pence signed a bill withdrawing the state from the Common Core. The motivation was to develop “academic standards that are written by Hoosiers, for Hoosiers,” according to Pence. Indiana teachers’ union members would not disagree that the CCSS cookie-cutter approach to education is more harmful to kids than helpful. Putting all political motivations aside, my Hoosier granddaughter just wishes her excellent teacher were free to, well, just teach

Here’s what my granddaughter thinks playing teacher looks like after two years of Common Core public school education:

Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
Scoop.it!

How Common Core Devalues Great Literature | Crisis Magazine

How Common Core Devalues Great Literature | Crisis Magazine | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it
Many years ago, a prominent man wrote to one of his favorite authors about his latest book.  This man had been a soldier, a hunter, an athlete, an historian, and a social reformer, and was now employed in a post

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, February 10, 2014 11:31 AM

10 February 2014

A careful reading of my comments regarding Common Core State Standards for Reading Literature WILL reveal both concerns and  appreciation for their intent. In other areas of the CCSS the teeter-totter tips more towards an appreciation for efforts to assess  and hold accountable both the skill sets of students and teachers than it does in the area of reading literature. 

 

There are areas of English Language Arts for which the development of valid  assessment tools with acceptable margins of error is possible. Mechanics, Usage and Grammar  (MUG), vocabulary, decoding, and advanced literacy skills all have "variables." But, there are generally accepted "ranges" of best practices for these and other skill sets. Many are useful in both Informational Reading as well as in Reading Literature. However, if we distinguish between the intent of Informational Reading and the intent of Reading Literature, it becomes painfully clear that assessing the former with an acceptable margin of error is infinitely easier than assessing the latter with an acceptable margin of error.

 

Though, personally I take a more moderate view of the negative impact of Common Core upon Reading Literature, this article, emotion-laden as it often is, confronts the proverbial elephant in the room without blinking. 

 

But, perhaps the amplification of the concerns that CCSS might be so misdirecting attention away from the very reason we teach literary reading that it may well be the case that the CCSS may be destroying what we intend to be nourishing; that is the engaged and thoughtful and rewarding pursuit of humankind's most persistent questions. 

 

My moderate response? I'm not ready to throw out the CCSS for Reading Literature. Reading Literature is too important. But, I'm not ready to give up the hope that a recognition that the assessment of Literary Reading as it stands may be doing more harm than good.

 

Perhaps a reminder from Sir Ken Robinson is in order...


"Another problem is that in this country there is a culture of standardized testing based on right or wrong types of answers. However, if you are looking at someone's paintings, reading their poetry, or listening to music, then you are focusing on a whole array of factors. We have a tendency to make the measurable important versus the important measureable..."


Perhaps it's time to wonder whether or not the CCSS Smarter Balance assessment in its current form fails the test of successfully measuring what is actually important in the case of Literary Reading.

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

 

 

 

 

Reading Power's curator insight, February 12, 2014 9:24 PM

The debate continues

Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

You want to know what's wrong with Common Core? | DailyKos.com

You want to know what's wrong with Common Core? | DailyKos.com | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

How about you take a look at ten minutes of video.  David Coleman lead the language arts team for Common Core, even though he has never been a teacher.  

 

Due warning -  Coleman is now head of the College Board, and in that capacity responsible for both the SATs and the Advanced Placement examinations.

 

Thus how he approaches things will carry inordinate weight in shaping education for America's future.

 

So take a look, and then see what you think.

 

Click headline to read more and view video ciips--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

The Common Core Ate My Baby and Other Urban Legends

The Common Core Ate My Baby and Other Urban Legends | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

It seems that each day you hear something else about the Common Core. This post explores "five myths about the new standards and shows what the standards really entail."

The five legends are listed below. Each is explained in detailed in the post.

Legend 1: The new standards prohibit teachers from setting purposes for reading or discussing prior knowledge.

Legend 2: Teachers are no longer required to teach phonological awareness, phonics, or fluency.

Legend 3: Teachers are no longer required to teach phonological awareness, phonics, or fluency.

Legend 4: Teachers must teach students at frustration levels.

Legend 5: Most schools are already teaching to the new standards.


Via Beth Dichter
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Part 1…Professional Education Learning Communities … Definition…Process…Common Core

Part 1…Professional Education Learning Communities … Definition…Process…Common Core | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

The first of a two part series on professional education learning communities. It looks at "Connecting and Collaborating...In and Out of the Classroom."
The post begins with a number of definitions of learning communities, how this concept is addressed in the new Common Core, and how learning communities benefit educators (and students).
A ten step approach is also discussed, beginning with "developing awareness" and finishing with "thinking like a living museum...and." For more information click through to the post.


Via Beth Dichter
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Computer Infrastructure Questions Related To Common Core Online Tests

Computer Infrastructure Questions Related To Common Core Online Tests | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

In the 2014-2015 school year it is expected that most schools will be testing students on computers. The question is are schools ready, and is the necessary infrastructure available, so that the Common Core tests may successfully be administered online?
This post explores this issue. Did you know that "All devices must have a 10” screen, a keyboard, internet access, and the ability to disable features that could be used to cheat during the test"? or that "in addition to computers, iPads, Android tablets, and Chromebooks running on newer operating systems will be able to be used for testing"?
The post also links to some posts that explore issues that Wyoming experienced with online testing and notes that "Adaptive testing is really beneficial and can pinpoint a student’s learning level more closely."


Via Beth Dichter
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from CCSS News Curated by Core2Class
Scoop.it!

What A Florida Middle School Has Learned So Far Teaching Common Core Standards

What A Florida Middle School Has Learned So Far Teaching Common Core Standards | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it
This story is part of a series from The Hechinger Report and StateImpact Florida looking at how Florida schools are getting ready for Common Core standards. Read -- and listen to -- the first story here.

Monroe Middle School teacher Dawn Norris hears a difference in her language arts classes since she starting using

Via Deb Gardner
Nicole Nicos insight:

Enlighting and interesting to know that there are schools out there that have already been implementing common core standards for two years and have had great success. Curious to see where it is heading

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from CCSS News Curated by Core2Class
Scoop.it!

Project-Based Learning and the Common Core: Resource Roundup

Project-Based Learning and the Common Core: Resource Roundup | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

Are you a project-based learning (PBL) school aligning to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS)? Are you a CCSS-aligned district needing to see the connections between the CCSS and PBL? Either way, here are some resources for you, broken down into three categories.


Via Deb Gardner
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Why Are Parents Revolting Against the Common Core? Start With the English Curriculum | Nicholas Tampio Blog | HuffPost.com

Why Are Parents Revolting Against the Common Core? Start With the English Curriculum | Nicholas Tampio Blog | HuffPost.com | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

My wife and I recently attended a coffee klatch to discuss the Common Core with our state senator. A teacher stood up and said, with a tremble in her voice and a tear in her eye:

 

"If parents knew what the Common Core is doing to the classroom, there would be a revolt."

 

What is happening to the classroom as a result of the Common Core? If you would like an answer to this question, spend some time with the English Language Arts (ELA) materials on the New York State Education Department (NYSED) website.

 

On the engageNY homepage, click on the words "Common Core Curriculum & Assessments." Follow the links until you get to Grade 5 ELA Module 1. Download the 589-page document.

 

The module is on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR).

 

This is a fine topic to discuss in school, though the module does confirm worries that the Common Core could be used to promote a political ideology. My critique here is that this module -- despite a disclaimer on the website -- is a script, and scripts suck the oxygen out of a classroom.

 

Here are a few minutes of the script:

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Nicole Nicos insight:

Hopefully we find a common middle ground when it comes to the idea of how we teach common core

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

A fight is brewing over tests in the Common Core age | WashPost.com

A fight is brewing over tests in the Common Core age | WashPost.com | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

Testing season begins soon in U.S. public schools, requiring millions of students to spend days answering standardized questions in math and reading, as mandated by an outdated federal law.

 

But this year is filled with tumult. Educators are questioning the purpose of testing, lawmakers in several states are pushing back against federal regulations, and a momentous standoff between California — the state with the largest number of public school students — and the Obama administration looms.

 

California is defying the requirements of No Child Left Behind, the federal education law that was set to expire in 2007 but hasn’t been replaced by Congress. The law says every state must give annual tests in math and reading to every student in grades 3 through 8 and report those scores publicly.

 

But California says it can’t administer the tests this year because, like much of the country, it has adopted new Common Core national academic standards and the corresponding exams aren’t ready.

 

Nearly everyone agrees that No Child Left Behind is broken, and the Obama administration has excused most states from various aspects of that law. But for Education Secretary Arne Duncan, watering down the law’s testing requirement is a bridge too far. He has threatened to withhold at least $3.5 billion in annual federal funding — money that California uses to educate poor and disabled children — if the state does not satisfy federal concerns.

 

“Testing is a critical component of accountability,” said Deborah Delisle, assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education at the Education Department. “Parents and community members want to know how we can measure student growth and student learning. We hold central to the fact that testing is an essential component.”

 

California is grappling with a problem facing much of the country this year. Forty-five states and the District of Columbia are teaching math and reading differently as a result of new academic standards. Known as the Common Core, the K-12 standards require new curricula, materials and teaching approaches.

 

But the accompanying standardized tests won’t be ready until next year.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Common Core in Action: 10 Visual Literacy Strategies | Edutopia.org

Common Core in Action: 10 Visual Literacy Strategies | Edutopia.org | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

Do you wish your students could better understand and critique the images that saturate their waking life? That's the purpose of visual literacy (VL), to explicitly teach a collection of competencies that will help students think through, think about and think with pictures.

Standards Support Visual Literacy Instruction

Visual literacy is a staple of 21st century skills, which state that learners must "demonstrate the ability to interpret, recognize, appreciate and understand information presented through visible actions, objects and symbols, natural or man-made."

 

Putting aside the imperative to teach students how to create meaningful images, the ability to read images is reflected in the following standards.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Nicole Nicos insight:

Some students are only visual learners; I'm a great example of that. I need to be able to visually see everything for me to understand and create a picture for myself. Common core assists learners like me

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

How Common Core Standards Kill Creative Teaching | Opinion | US News & World Report

How Common Core Standards Kill Creative Teaching | Opinion | US News & World Report | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

I once saw an eighth grader who was on the verge of being tossed out of his middle school even though he was one of the brightest kids there. When asked why he was failing, he said, “Why should I be doing the same frickin' thing since I was in third grade?" Another student I heard about could comprehend the whole "Harry Potter" series before she was 11 and read two novels a week, yet thinks she “sucks at English” because she is more nuanced in her thinking than the questions on standardized tests allow. She learned to hate reading.

 

Why did this happen to them? The answer lies in the drive to commonize education.

 

At first glance, the curriculum standards known as Common Core look appealing. Who could be against improved critical thinking and communication skills or more progressive, student centered teaching? Who could be against collaborative thinking and reflective learning or being "college and career ready"?

 

 

But as teacher-blogger Jose Vilson, puts it, "People who advocate for the [Common Core standards] miss the bigger picture. ... [They] came as a package deal with the new teacher evaluations, higher stakes testing, and austerity measures, including school closings." The Common Core is just the last of a series of politicized and incentivized business models inappropriately being applied to education.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Nicole Nicos insight:

This article had interesting information about common core that if it's true it's sad to hear. Talking about the fact that when common core was created no k-12 teacher was involved in the creation of the program.

Ben Bempong's curator insight, July 31, 2015 9:57 AM

I believe the common core is a new set of curriculum standards.  I am positive that through years of trial and error, their will be facets changes to the common core that will help smooth it out a curriculum.  Teachers and educator should start looking at the positives of the common core and not the negatives.

Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

The Fatal Flaw of the Common Core Standards | Diane Ravitch | CommonDreams.org

The Fatal Flaw of the Common Core Standards | Diane Ravitch | CommonDreams.org | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

Across the nation, parents and educators are raising objections to the Common Core standards, and many states are reconsidering whether to abandon them and the federally-funded tests that accompany them. Arne Duncan, Jeb Bush, Bill Gates, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and the Business Roundtable vocally support them, yet the unease continues and pushback remains intense.

 

Why so much controversy?

 

The complaints are coming from all sides: from Tea Party activists who worry about a federal takeover of education and from educators, parents, and progressives who believe that the Common Core will standardize instruction and eliminate creativity in their classrooms.

 

But there is a more compelling reason to object to the Common Core standards.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Nine Ways the Common Core Will Change Classroom Practice

Nine Ways the Common Core Will Change Classroom Practice | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

The Common Core State Standards may "share many features and concepts with existing standards" but "the new standards also represent a substantial departure from current practice in a number of respects."

This post looks at the differences in Mathematics and ELA, providing an explanation with some details for each difference.

In Mathematics the differences listed are;
* Greater Focus

* Coherence

* Skills, Understanding, and Application

* Emphasis on Practices

In English Language Arts the differences listed are:
* More Nonfiction

* Focus on Evidence

* "Staircase" of Text Complexity

* Speaking and Listening

* Literacy in the Content Area


Via Beth Dichter
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Cool Tools for 21st Century Learners: Common Core Connections: Unpacking Academic Vocabulary

Cool Tools for 21st Century Learners: Common Core Connections: Unpacking Academic Vocabulary | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

"Are you wondering where to begin to adopt the Common Core Vocabulary Standards? While there are many specific vocabulary standards clearly listed in the K-12 Language strand, it's helpful and important to look at Academic Vocabulary from the big picture view known as Shift 6. Let's unpack it."

In this post Susan Oxnevad looks at the three tiers of vocabulary and discusses the need to target instruction on Tier 2 and Tier 3 words. There is a short video that provides an introducation to Academic Vocabulary as well as a look at some tools that woulr provide help for students learning Tier 2 words. Many great resources are provided.


Via Beth Dichter
Carla Kessler's curator insight, August 22, 2015 11:33 PM

When you are reading non-fiction in groups, here are some tools to help your students unpack Tier 2 and 3 words as they discuss their understanding and choose strategies to improve comprehension. 

Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

A White Paper on the Common Core Standards

A White Paper on the Common Core Standards | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

"Jay McTighe and I have written a white paper on implementation of the Common Core Standards entitled From Common Core Standards to Curriculum: Five Big Ideas. In it we propose a strategy for ensuring that the Common Core Standards are appropriately addressed in curriculum and assessment design locally. We also highlight common misconceptions about what the Standards do and do not demand of educators locally."

The paper has five big ideas (quoted below):

#1 - The Common Core Standards have new emphases and require a careful reading.

#2 -  Standards are not curriculum.

#3 - Standards need to be "unpacked."

#4 - A coherent curriculum is mapped backwards from desired performances.

#5 - The standards come to life through the assessments.

A short excerpt is also available if you click through.


Via Beth Dichter
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Nico from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Why Doesn't the New York Times Understand the Controversy Over Common Core? | Diane Ravitch Blog

Why Doesn't the New York Times Understand the Controversy Over Common Core? | Diane Ravitch Blog | Common Core: The myth, know how's and no go's | Scoop.it

In story after story, the New York Times consistently misses the essence of the controversy surrounding Common Core.

 

Today’s New York Times gives its lead article on page 1, column right, top of the fold, to the battle raging within the Republican party, about the Common Core. On one side is Jeb Bush, standing up for the Common Core standards (presumably a moderate, let’s not talk about his fight for vouchers and for the destruction of public education in Florida), while on the other are figures like Ted Cruz and other extremists of the party. Common Core, we are told, is now the “wedge issue” in the Republican party, with sensible people like Jeb Bush fending off the extremists.

 

A few weeks ago, the newspaper wrote an editorial enthusiastically endorsing the Common Core standards, while giving no evidence for its enthusiasm other than the promises offered by the advocates of Common Core.

 

Story after story has repeated the narrative invented by Arne Duncan, that the only opponents of the Common Core are members of the Tea Party and other extremists.

 

Occasionally a story will refer to extremists of the right and the left, as though no reasonable person could possibly doubt the claims made on behalf of the Common Core.

 

Of course, David Brooks’ column on Friday echoed the now familiar trope of the Times, that only extremists could oppose this worthy and entirely laudable endeavor.

 

Missing is any acknowledgement of the many researchers who have challenged the wacky assumption that standards alone will cause everyone’s achievement to rise higher and higher, despite no evidence for this assertion.

 

Missing is any recognition that there are reputable educators and scholars and parents who are disturbed either by the substance of the standards or by the development process (Anthony Cody, for example, just won the Education Writers Association’s first prize award for his series of blogs challenging the claims of the Common Core).

 

Missing is the pushback from teachers that caused the leaders of the NEA and the AFT to call for a slowdown in implementation of the standards (the media sees this only as teachers’ fear of being evaluated by tests).

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
No comment yet.