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Portraits of Reconciliation

Portraits of Reconciliation | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
20 years after the genocide in Rwanda, these perpetrators and survivors are standing for forgiveness.
Richard Aitchison's insight:
Images create so much power. As stated before in a few scoops (I seem to gravitate towards some of these beautiful and puzzling photos) the power of images can create so many emotions and we then can use these powerful thoughts and emotions to strike important conversations. When talking about Rwanda one must always discuss the genocide that took place. In this article we  the project by Pieter Hugo. In this project the people who agreed to be photographed are part of a continuing national effort toward reconciliation and worked closely with AMI (Association Modeste et Innocent), a nonprofit organization. In AMI’s program, small groups of Hutus and Tutsis are counseled over many months, culminating in the perpetrator’s formal request for forgiveness. If forgiveness is granted by the survivor, the perpetrator and his family and friends typically bring a basket of offerings, usually food and sorghum or banana beer. The accord is sealed with song and dance.
The  photos show two people connected in some way from the genocide in a piece of forgiveness. This project should help show that we can forgive and we can move forward as a society. As we continue to witness societal problems throughout the world we can use these images to discuss key topics in the world. We always say there will never be another.....name a catastrophe. However, we always seem to not learn from history. These images show that we must learn and that going forward it is key to learn from past mistakes. Again a must read and must watch article! Truly amazing to see these photos and read their stories. 
Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:35 PM

Rwanda is a genocide that many people don't even know about. Regardless of whether someones heard of it, they should still be aware of how people have lived their lives from that time. Some looking to forgive the people who did this, and others looking to gain forgiveness from those they hurt.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:17 PM

You hear about how people in Rwanda forgiving the perpetrators that killed their families, parents, husbands, and children.  They can say that they have fully forgiven them and that they are on good terms with each other or they forgave someone and that was it.  Seeing the body language that these people have together really makes it real.  Some people are seen awkwardly next to each other while others are touching, even holding hands.  Seeing the pictures of both perpetrator and survivor together after forgiveness has been granted can do a lot more than words can in telling what kind of relationship these people have together twenty years after the genocide. 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:17 AM

In an almost unthinkable arrangement, these pictures feature victims of the Rwandan genocide standing with the perpetrators who often killed their families. In a genocide where most of the killings were committed with machetes and perpetrated by neighbors attacking neighbors, it is difficult to imagine how the survivors feel and how they can stand to forgive the killers. It brings up the question of what right do these killers have to ask forgiveness from their victims?

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Sydney Games: a lasting legacy? - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Sydney Games: a lasting legacy? - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
The Sydney 2000 Olympics promised much for the harbour city and Australia. But what has been the legacy of these games?
Richard Aitchison's insight:
Original content-
In 2000 the world witness Sydney, Australia on display for all of us to see. Sydney was the host of the 2000 Summer Olympics and was ready to show off to the world its beautiful city. As we have seen through other areas we try to analyze what the lasting legacy of these games would be? Lots of time the Olympics brings great promise, but in the after math we see that it does not deliver. So what happened in Sydney? Well I guess we can say the good outweighed the bad. There is little doubt that Sydney now has world class sporting and entertainment venues: the Olympic stadium, the Olympic Park Aquatic Centre, the Superdome, the Tennis Centre and the International Regatta Centre. As a result, Australia was able to host the 2003 Rugby World Cup and last year's World Masters Games. It also puts us in a more competitive position to win the rights to the 2022 FIFA World Cup. There have been environmental and social benefits with the creation of the largest metropolitan parkland in Australia: 430 hectares of ecologically significant wetlands, woodlands and remediated lands plus a network of over 40 kilometers of pedestrian and cycle paths. The country's first large-scale urban water recycling system was established, saving about 850 million liters of drinking water a year. Two new suburbs have also been created: Sydney Olympic Park and nearby Newington (formerly the athletes' village), said to be one of the world's biggest solar-powered suburbs. However, while talking about the good experiences we must mention a few of the disappointing things that came out of the games. A KPMG report prepared for the Games' bid in 1993 predicted that it would add $7.3 billion to the economy and create 156,000 new jobs. But a detailed analysis by Melbourne's Monash University has found that the Olympics "in purely measurable economic variables ... had a negative effect on New South Wales and Australia as a whole". Specifically, a net consumption loss of $2.1 billion.
So as we see the good probably ended up outweighing the bad and what value do you put on pride of the people in the area? As they can proudly cheer  "Aussie Aussie Aussie, Oi Oi Oi"
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The Great Barrier Reef was not bleached naturally

The Great Barrier Reef was not bleached naturally | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it

"This year, we’ve seen alarming bleaching of the Great Barrier Reef, caused by warm sea temperatures. A recently completed aerial survey of the reef found that 93 percent of the smaller reefs that comprise it showed at least some bleaching, and in the northern sector of the reef, the large majority of reefs saw bleaching that was severe — meaning many of these corals could die.  There was already considerable murmuring that this event, which damages a famous World Heritage site and could deal a blow to a highly valuable tourism industry, did not simply happen by chance. And now, a near real-time analysis by a group of Australian climate and coral reef researchers has affirmed that the extremely warm March sea temperatures in the Coral Sea, which are responsible for the event, were hardly natural."

 

Tags: biogeography, environment, ecology, Australia, Oceania.

Richard Aitchison's insight:
The Great barrier Reef is ana amazing area to explore. Its truly a marvel and a beautiful site. It is also a major boost for tourism and well the majorty of the Reef is seeing heavy bleaching. The updated analysis is that most of the damage has done done by higher sea temps caused by climate change through human beings. Most of these studies however, have not been peer reviewed, but the study was very through. If this continues to happen we will see one of the worlds great marvels continue to to bleach and many of the corals could die.  This is devasting for a few reasons first off people that want to visit this beautiful site and take it in this limits there opportunity. Also for the locals this will greatly hurt the tourism business. Tourism is a huge ecnomic boost in this area and if the Reef continues to be damaged we could see a major turn in the economics in this area. This could eventually lead to the upright in migration from this area and could cause other issues within the country. People owning businesses in the area could be greatly affected as well. This would be a shame to see a beautiful area be tarnished.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 2018 10:30 PM
As the temperature of the sea rises, the great barrier reef has seen some devastating bleaching. Because of its severity, many of these corals, that were once beautiful and pigmented, could die. Researchers have discovered that this rise in temperature is due to humans.
K Rome's curator insight, October 6, 2018 7:30 PM
The Great barrier Reef is ana amazing area to explore. Its truly a marvel and a beautiful site. It is also a major boost for tourism and well the majorty of the Reef is seeing heavy bleaching. The updated analysis is that most of the damage has done done by higher sea temps caused by climate change through human beings. Most of these studies however, have not been peer reviewed, but the study was very through. If this continues to happen we will see one of the worlds great marvels continue to to bleach and many of the corals could die.  This is devasting for a few reasons first off people that want to visit this beautiful site and take it in this limits there opportunity. Also for the locals this will greatly hurt the tourism business. Tourism is a huge ecnomic boost in this area and if the Reef continues to be damaged we could see a major turn in the economics in this area. This could eventually lead to the upright in migration from this area and could cause other issues within the country. People owning businesses in the area could be greatly affected as well. This would be a shame to see a beautiful area be tarnished.
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 5:30 PM
A terrible occurrence in many ways for the Great Barrier reef in Australia. This bleaching is occurring because of warm sea temperatures. The damage could cause many corals to die and that forces other animals to adapt and migrate. This is an environmental issue that definitely needs to be looked at, but it is also an issue for Australia's tourism. Ecotourism is a huge pull for Australia that gets people and money into the country so it is in their best interests to figure out a way to save the Great Barrier Reef.
 
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Australia flood: Uluru national park closed after huge rainfall

Australia flood: Uluru national park closed after huge rainfall | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
Record rainfall in central Australia leads to flash floods and the closure of Uluru national park.

 

Tags: Australia, environment, weather and climate, water.

Richard Aitchison's insight:
A pretty amazing sight to see. The Uluru national park had to be closed down after massive amounts of rainfall. In the pictures you can see the flash floods caused what looks like waterfalls from Ayers Rock, which is right in the middle of the national park. If you just look at the picture itself it does actually look amazing and beautiful, however living there in real life it became very hazardous. As the article explained the town was cut off and severely imparied from Western Australia thus if they needed help they would not be able to recieve from that area. It is diasters like this that we must have plans in place in case of a problem that arises. The even twas described as twice in a century type weather, however we have seen more occurences of this lately and thus plans must be put in place. From afar we can marvel at images like this, but locally we must continue to be agressive when coming up with disaster plans.
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 23, 2018 1:29 PM
Describing this level of a storm in the Australian outback as a "twice in a century storm" seem very appropriate. In a region that gets very little rain every year, this massive storm shows that even in a desert, a lot of rain can fall in very little time. The massive floods following the rain have probably been experienced by very few people still alive and as such the communities affected did not know how t adequately prepare. 
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How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks

How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it

"It's something you can see on every block in most major cities. You probably see one every day and never give give it a second thought. But in Yangon, Myanmar in 2013, an ATM was a small miracle. For decades, Myanmar was cut off from the rest of the world. There were international sanctions, and no one from the U.S. or Europe did business there."

Richard Aitchison's insight:
We often take for granted our infrastructe and in this case our banking system. Have we seen recessions, yes , have we seen our banks fail yes, but to not trust them at all well thats another story. In pretty much every American city and most major cities around the world ATMs are very common. I am pretty sure most of us have used an ATM at least once if not all of the time. So when the small country of Myanmar had its sanctions lifted and VISA and Mastecard had the opportunity to put in ATMs they went for it and thought it would be a great ooportunity. They did forsee what would happen though. Myanmar citizens had almost no confidence in their banking system thus most people just kept their money at home with them. So since they did not have money in the banks they did not need to use the ATMs. Its very important for companies, even big ones such as Visa and Mastercard, to understand the market and the culture of the population in which they are setting up the business. If Visa and Mastercard had done a little more research they might have foreseen this problem. In this ever global world it is important for businesses to remain culuturally aware or risk losing mililons.  For start up companies or investment companies it becomes even more important as they do market research as well.
brielle blais's curator insight, May 3, 2018 3:33 PM
This showcases how different cultures in different places really are. The idea of credit cards in Myanmar isn't exactly greeted with positivity. Most people are skeptical of the banks and keep their money at home instead. This way of living seems so different to people from places like the US because Myanmar doesn't have and connection to the US with institutions such as banks and atm. However this way of running a country does not allow for anything to be fixed, which is why is it so rugged, with cars with no floors, awful roads, and anything else that a bank would normally help fund. 
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How Vietnam became a coffee giant

How Vietnam became a coffee giant | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it

"Think of coffee and you will probably think of Brazil, Colombia, or maybe Ethiopia. But the world's second largest exporter today is Vietnam. How did its market share jump from 0.1% to 20% in just 30 years, and how has this rapid change affected the country?"


Richard Aitchison's insight:
So how does a traditionally tea drinking country, become the 2nd biggest export of coffee? Well we need to look at colonization and well desperation. While the Vietnamese still prefer to drink tea many of the French that were there during colonization prefered coffee. However, coffee production never really took off until post Vietnam War and with a desperation move to help the economy. With a floundering economy and practices that were not working the government turned its eye to coffee production. At the time 60% of Vietnamese people lived below the poverty line, however nowadays they are just about under 10%. It is not without its problems as it has caused problems with destruction of land and heading into the future they have started to exhaust all of the lands that they can use to produce coffee.  They will need to continue to be innovative if they want to continue to see a surge in the coffee market. It is definitely interesting to see why and how certain items are exported out of countries and the history behind it. I for one would never think Vietnam would be a coffee giant.  
Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:29 PM
Typically I would always associate coffee and coffee beans coming from Spanish speaking countries and I would associate Asian countries with drinking tea. This threw me for a little twist, The Vietnamese do drink coffee though. Coffee was introduced to Vietnam in the 19th century by the French. A majority of their coffee beans are exported since the country needs money. After the Vietnam war had ended, their communist ally, The Soviet Union did nothing to help the crippled country. Agriculture was a disaster, bu the government decided to take a risk in the 80s with growing coffee. It was a success and kept increasing 20%-30% every year in the 90s. Now it employs over two million people. Even major brands like Nestle has coffee bean growing rights there.
tyrone perry's curator insight, May 1, 2018 12:59 PM
Vietnam is one of the highest coffee producers of the world.  It help bring down the poverty level in the country.  But when something good happens of course something negative has to happen.  Many of Vietnam’s fields are thought to still be filled with mines from the war.  Because of that many forests have been cut down to provide fields to grow the coffee.  Needless to say their environmental dangers are rising.
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 17, 2018 12:51 PM
Vietnam does cultivate rice but it is the worlds second largest exporter of coffee. Vietnamese do not drink coffee much they are more of tea drinkers. The cultivation of coffee has been good economically for the country but environmentally it has ruined the country.
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North and South Korea to march together at Olympics

North and South Korea to march together at Olympics | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
North and South Korean athletes will march together at the Winter Olympics opening ceremony under a unified flag, the South announced Wednesday.
Richard Aitchison's insight:
it was truly a chilling and amazing sight to see, North Korea and South Korea marched together under one flag during the Olympics opening ceremony this past winter in South Korea. A show of unity between two countries that have been at war which seems like forever. It shows that sports can always be the great equalizer. Nationality, race, and everything else that "separates" us we can turn a blind eye to. However, since then we have seen new discussions between the two sides. North Korea will even meet with President Donald Trump and we might have seen an overall breakthrough. From a political standpoint this is a major event, but for the people that live in these countries this has to be an emotional time. For so long these countries have been split and families have been split it had to be amazing for these people to witness this event. The Olympics always is a call for national pride and to see a unified Korea in South Korea will be a memory that will last a long time in Olympic history. Where this leads no one will really know, but for a moment in time there are unity and peace in Korea. 
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China's one-child policy and the lessons for America

China's one-child policy and the lessons for America | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
Let's review exactly what population has to do with economic growth
Richard Aitchison's insight:
For years growing up you always heard about China's one child policy. It was well known growing up that China was trying to limit its population. However, that practice in China has finally come to an end. After years of trying to limit the population they have finally run into the problem they all should have seen coming. The population simply has become to old to support itself. Eventually, if you limit the amount of births you end up with more older people that can work than younger people supporting them. This eventually could cause a major economic slip and as China continues to try to gain in the global world this could really hinder their efforts. The US always worries about when all the baby boomers retire and how will we keep up social security, but China's problems far outlast the United States at the is point. China now should see a slowly growing work force, but it will take years before they see the outcome of removing their one child policy. Countries through the years have continued to try to control population and worries about population however every time they try to correct it they see a bounce in a direction that cannot be sustainable. Like the economic system it should be a free market in the baby market.
Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:57 AM

Unit 2

Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, December 3, 2015 8:03 AM

añada su visión ...

Olivia Campanella's curator insight, December 14, 2018 9:46 PM
In 1997 the policy of just one chid was instituted , preventing an estimated 400 million births by either abortion, infanticide, forced sterilization, and a dramatic gender imbalance. Ironically, the policy was inspired wholly based out of paranoia that population growth would stifle the Chinese economy
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Getting Japanese Citizenship

Getting Japanese Citizenship | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it

"To become a Japanese citizen, a foreigner must display 'good conduct', among other things. The rules do not specify what that means, and make no mention of living wafu (Japanese-style). But for one candidate, at least, it involved officials looking in his fridge and inspecting his children’s toys to see if he was Japanese enough (he was). Bureaucratic discretion is the main reason why it is hard to get Japanese nationality. The ministry of justice, which handles the process, says officials may visit applicants’ homes and talk to their neighbors."

Richard Aitchison's insight:
Interesting to see how the Japanese handle citizenship differently than most of world and America. Japan is mostly a homogeneous culture and from seeing there citizenship laws one can tell why. A foreigner must live there for 10 years  and display "good conduct" which no one really knows what it is and also prove to be Japanese enough in culture. It will be interesting to see how this continues today in a world that keeps becoming more and more global. All over the news we see constant backlash about countries that do not want to accept more immigrants or give certain rights to citizens, however you never really hear of the Japanese. The Japanese have many cultures that they can keep alive with mostly a homogeneous population and most likely helps cause less violence and less arguments among its politics. Imagine if here in America they searched your house to see if you were American enough? I think that might be headline news by the night. 
tyrone perry's curator insight, April 24, 2018 10:35 PM
If you want to move and live in Japan and attain a citizenship be ready to give up your current citizenship and go on one heck of a rollercoaster.  Japan is one of the toughest places to get a citizenship.  For one you have to live there for at least 10 years.  Then the government can and will come to your home to inspect it from the types of pens you have there to the kid of pictures you hang on your wall.  The main thing is the Japanese government wants you to really adapt to their culture.  Very few are naturalized, out of 12446 that applied only 9400 were accepted.  But the good news is, is it is free compared to 550 in the US and 1200 in the U.k.
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Uneven Developement and Corporate Aid

Uneven Developement and Corporate Aid | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it

"All Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wants to do is make the world a better place for his new daughter. While he’s technically on paternity leave, he couldn’t sit idly by as India attempts to halt Internet.org, Facebook’s initiative to provide free but limited internet to the developing world."

Richard Aitchison's insight:
This was a very interesting read and a problem that will probably continue as we move forward. It is hard to believe that one billion people could not have internet access! That India wants to grow as a nation and continue to connect in this global world this would seem quite backwards. In this scenario CEO and founder of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg is offering free although limited internet access in India. However, its the limited access that has made net neutrality voices heard. They believe this will make it a walled off area in which the limited access will cause the Indian people only be able to see certain views and the companies chosen to be on the server will be the "winners" in India. One would figure India would have figured out a way to address this issue. In the world that we live in it is of utter most importance to have internet access. It is a major tool in everyday life, but also in education. If India wants to continue to grow in this global world then they must do something, if its not Mark Zuckerberg's idea then they must come up with an alternative. Its great to just say you  do not like an idea, but can you come up with an idea yourself that will work? This will be interesting to view going forward.  
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India to 'divert rivers' to tackle drought

India to 'divert rivers' to tackle drought | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
India is to divert water from major rivers like the Brahmaputra and the Ganges to deal with severe drought, a senior minister tells the BBC.
Richard Aitchison's insight:
As everyone knows, water is key. We usually talk about water in geography has a way to export/import or for key military purposes. Here we are talking about survival and certain states within in India (29 to be exact) that were suffering through a drought and whose rivers had been completely dried up. India has tried a new plan to try to get water to these areas, by diverting water from there other rivers to these states. This is an interesting way to try to deal with this problem, however is it really feasible to do this?  Would this eventually causes problems in the areas in which we are taking the water from? Also this would be very expensive and India , who is still a growing country,  could hurt them economically for years to come. No one has said this will work and while yes, its horrible to see what has happen to these areas, but is this just a quick fix. What would the plan be for a future drought, is there anyway to come up with a better plan? Possibly will these people need to move in the future. Our rivers and lands are constantly changing so as people we might have to move away from areas that which were once habitable, but now may not be. 
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 23, 2018 12:26 PM
Extreme drought combined with inefficient agricultural practices and the depletion of groundwater resources have creates a water crisis in India. However the solution to the drought seems poorly planned and likely to fail. There is no evidence showing that a massive water diversion project like this will succeed in alleviating the effects of such a massive drought. 
brielle blais's curator insight, May 1, 2018 6:45 PM
Drought is a factor of the physical geography of an area that is in trouble. India is heavily depended on monsoon rains, and for two years have no received what they normally do, and 330 million people are affected by it. The country is planning to divert different rivers to solve the issue. "The government says the scheme will irrigate 35,000 hectares of land and generate 34,000 megawatts of electricity." This will exponentially help those dealing with the water crisis, but also help with other thing such as electricity. 
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Bangladesh's Hazardous Geography

Bangladesh's Hazardous Geography | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
Bangladesh is exposed to threat of hazards resulting from a number of natural disasters and remains classified as one the most vulnerable countries. Majority of the country is affected by cyclone, drought and floods.
Richard Aitchison's insight:
These maps help show all of the natural disasters that Bangladesh is accustomed to. As one look through all of the maps that shows such things such as flood zone, cyclone zones, and drought zones we can tell that this country is ripe with geographical issues that will effect its problems both politically and economically.  With this many geographical problems with natural disasters one can only imagine how much money the country spends simply on just rebuilding itself. It is hard to continue to move forward as a country when you need to constantly rebuild. Also you become dependent on other countries with a need for foreign aid for these problems. By needing foreign aid Bangladesh becomes dependent on these countries thus making it harder for them to make good deals for their economy. If you were setting up the perfect location for a country, Bangladesh probably would not be the first place selected. However, we must look at the history of the people that live there and see why this location was chosen?  Also we must look at the future and with a changing climate how will it effect Bangladesh geography, and will we eventually see people moving out of the country and how will that effect the surrounding areas and their population. 
Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 2016 8:47 PM

Multiple challenges already face residents of Dhaka and Bangladesh in its entirety, but add into the mix climate change and the situation becomes even worse. How does this human induced phenomenon impact upon the population of the developing country and its ever-growing Mega City?

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Why Africa’s migrant crisis makes no sense to outsiders

Why Africa’s migrant crisis makes no sense to outsiders | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it

"Violence and insecurity are so bad that other war-torn countries have become sites of refuge."

 

In 2015, nearly 100,000 Ethiopians and Somalis traveled by boat to Yemen, one of the world's most dangerous countries. Last year, nearly 5,000 citizens of Congo, which is fighting powerful rebel groups, were seeking refuge in the Central African Republic, itself torn apart by civil war. And yet 10,000 Burundians have fled their country's own growing civil unrest for Congo. Thousands of Nigerians escaping the extremist Islamist group Boko Haram have gone to Chad, where different strains of that same insurgency conduct frequent deadly attacks. 

 

Developing countries have long taken in a disproportionate number of the world's refugees — roughly 80 percent, according to the United Nations. But even for migration experts and relief workers, the willingness of refugees to leave one war for another is shocking. It's also proving an enormous challenge for humanitarian agencies, which are already overstretched and often not equipped to welcome refugees in countries that are still racked by conflict.

 

Tags: refugees, Africa, migration, conflict, political, war. 

Richard Aitchison's insight:
When we hear of migration or refugee issues we tend to think towards Europe and many of the current day issues with Syria. Most date proves that as well, as listed in the article roughly 80% of refugee movement comes in the developed world.  Now we get  to the more shocking part of the article that we are seeing a refugee crisis in Africa. First off this is the first time for myself hearing this and probably because its not major national news and is buried way below the more "important" problems of the developed world in Europe. However, yes this is a problem and many people who study migration are shocked by it. People are leaving one war zone and immediately move to a possible more unstable land into more war. Why and how does this make sense? People have fled there own countries to find worst situations and have gone to governments that can not support them and an outside world that while trying to help support some of these current countries can not help support refugee as well. This will be a continuing problem until Africa can become more stabilized and we stop seeing genocide and other authoritarian government policies.  The study of why people move is always very captivating as we often tend to think we know exactly why people move to and from areas. However, as the article shows until you are put in a desire situation one can not truly know what you would do, such as move your family to a war torn country because just maybe its better than your war torn country. We need to continue to assess this area and try to not just fund the area, but try to find ways in which we can stabilize an area. The major importance of this article is that we realize there is a problem first, with out articles like this the focus would continue to stay on Europe and more developed areas. 
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Portraits of Reconciliation

Portraits of Reconciliation | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
20 years after the genocide in Rwanda, these perpetrators and survivors are standing for forgiveness.
Richard Aitchison's insight:
Images create so much power. As stated before in a few scoops (I seem to gravitate towards some of these beautiful and puzzling photos) the power of images can create so many emotions and we then can use these powerful thoughts and emotions to strike important conversations. When talking about Rwanda one must always discuss the genocide that took place. In this article we  the project by Pieter Hugo. In this project the people who agreed to be photographed are part of a continuing national effort toward reconciliation and worked closely with AMI (Association Modeste et Innocent), a nonprofit organization. In AMI’s program, small groups of Hutus and Tutsis are counseled over many months, culminating in the perpetrator’s formal request for forgiveness. If forgiveness is granted by the survivor, the perpetrator and his family and friends typically bring a basket of offerings, usually food and sorghum or banana beer. The accord is sealed with song and dance.
The  photos show two people connected in some way from the genocide in a piece of forgiveness. This project should help show that we can forgive and we can move forward as a society. As we continue to witness societal problems throughout the world we can use these images to discuss key topics in the world. We always say there will never be another.....name a catastrophe. However, we always seem to not learn from history. These images show that we must learn and that going forward it is key to learn from past mistakes. Again a must read and must watch article! Truly amazing to see these photos and read their stories. 
Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:35 PM

Rwanda is a genocide that many people don't even know about. Regardless of whether someones heard of it, they should still be aware of how people have lived their lives from that time. Some looking to forgive the people who did this, and others looking to gain forgiveness from those they hurt.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:17 PM

You hear about how people in Rwanda forgiving the perpetrators that killed their families, parents, husbands, and children.  They can say that they have fully forgiven them and that they are on good terms with each other or they forgave someone and that was it.  Seeing the body language that these people have together really makes it real.  Some people are seen awkwardly next to each other while others are touching, even holding hands.  Seeing the pictures of both perpetrator and survivor together after forgiveness has been granted can do a lot more than words can in telling what kind of relationship these people have together twenty years after the genocide. 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:17 AM

In an almost unthinkable arrangement, these pictures feature victims of the Rwandan genocide standing with the perpetrators who often killed their families. In a genocide where most of the killings were committed with machetes and perpetrated by neighbors attacking neighbors, it is difficult to imagine how the survivors feel and how they can stand to forgive the killers. It brings up the question of what right do these killers have to ask forgiveness from their victims?

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The World's Newest (Official) Ocean

The World's Newest (Official) Ocean | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it

"The Southern Ocean extends from the coast of Antarctica north to 60 degrees south latitude. The Southern Ocean is now the fourth largest of the world's five oceans (after the Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, and Indian Ocean, but larger than the Arctic Ocean). The International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) has  declared, named, and demarcated the Southern Ocean as a fifth, separate ocean."

Richard Aitchison's insight:
The Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Artic as an American student growing up those were the Oceans that I grew up learning about. So to see an article talking about the Southern Ocean comes as kind of a surprise. We learn as young American students about "Atlantic trade" or our West Coast with "Pacific Trade" we as young students learn about the mysterious Indian Ocean and the unattainable Artic Ocean,  but for some reason the Southern Ocean has been left out. The Southern Ocean as the article explains is the 5th and newest Ocean. Ocean scientist thought it was necessary to name the the body of water south of the Pacific but north of the Artic. While it might not seem that important to some it is key to identify with areas. When we discuss Atlantic trade for the most part in the United States we know we are discussing trade with the Europeans or on our East Coast. When discussing Pacific trade we understand that to be West Coast and probably dealing with China or other Asian countries. As an Australian resident or student they grow up learning about this key body of water to them. They can use it to identity where they are and where they are going. We can also use the body of water to discuss different weather pattern and effects on the countries in Oceania region of the world. An interesting read if  you want to learn more about our forgotten 5th Ocean. 
Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 24, 2018 12:22 PM
This is slightly embarrassing to admit, but I have never heard of the Southern Ocean.  I think it is because, as mentioned in class the other day, we do not talk about the Southern Hemisphere very often.  When looking a globe this entire ocean is on the bottom and pretty much out of sight.  I thought that it was interesting that the creation of this ocean was created within my lifetime because all of the rest of the world’s oceans are well documented throughout history.  Even though the water in the Southern Ocean has been there just as long as the other oceans, it hadn’t been designated as an ocean.  I think another reason that I haven’t heard much about the Southern Ocean is because it doesn’t really have any direct impacts on Americans.  All of our trade routes avoid this area of the world, we don’t have any landclaims within the ocean, and very few Americans have actually gone to Anarctica.  This article also talks about the boundaries and the conflict regarding how far north the boundaries of the ocean would be.  Most members of the IHO supported the boundary being at 60 degrees.  However, 7 countries pushed to have the boundary set at 50 degrees.  The reason most countries supported the 60 degree boundary is because it doesn’t add any land outside of Anarctica to the ocean.  Although this article doesn’t state which countries wanted the boundary at 50 degrees, I am guessing its countries with land very far south, like Argentina, Chile, Australia, and maybe South Africa.  This would allow them control over the Southern Ocean that they can’t get with the current boundaries.  It is interesting that it took until 2002 for the point to be raised that the Southern Ocean is district enough from the other oceans, that it should be considered a separate ocean.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, May 3, 2018 11:25 AM
(Oceania) Geography experts now claim the waters around Antarctica will join the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Arctic as the fifth ocean. Almost every member of the International Hydrographic Organization declared the existence of the South Ocean, which extends to 60° S latitude and is double the size of the United States. While it might seem trivial, the Southern Ocean has the most powerful water current, a different circulation, and a unique ecosystem, marking it separate from other bodies of water.
K Rome's curator insight, October 6, 2018 7:30 PM
The Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Artic as an American student growing up those were the Oceans that I grew up learning about. So to see an article talking about the Southern Ocean comes as kind of a surprise. We learn as young American students about "Atlantic trade" or our West Coast with "Pacific Trade" we as young students learn about the mysterious Indian Ocean and the unattainable Artic Ocean,  but for some reason the Southern Ocean has been left out. The Southern Ocean as the article explains is the 5th and newest Ocean. Ocean scientist thought it was necessary to name the the body of water south of the Pacific but north of the Artic. While it might not seem that important to some it is key to identify with areas. When we discuss Atlantic trade for the most part in the United States we know we are discussing trade with the Europeans or on our East Coast. When discussing Pacific trade we understand that to be West Coast and probably dealing with China or other Asian countries. As an Australian resident or student they grow up learning about this key body of water to them. They can use it to identity where they are and where they are going. We can also use the body of water to discuss different weather pattern and effects on the countries in Oceania region of the world. An interesting read if  you want to learn more about our forgotten 5th Ocean. 
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New Zealand panel unveils four alternate flag options, to a largely negative reaction.

New Zealand panel unveils four alternate flag options, to a largely negative reaction. | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
Kiwis aren't showing their enthusiasm toward the final four alternate flags they'll be allowed to choose between. We analyze the results.
Richard Aitchison's insight:
We might think a flag choice is not that important. However, think about it for one second. Think of the feeling you get when you see a certian flag or a certain symbol. If your a Red Sox fan and see a Yankees symbol think of what that means to you or if your a Red Sox fan and your in a foreign area and see a Red Sox hat and that feeling that you get knowing someone is like you in that area. Symbols are important and how we feel about these symbols are important. New Zealand was looking to unviel a new flag and much of the reaction was negative. Most thought they were uncreative and unorginal and overall just not a fan of the final four choices. I thought a good quote from the article was " This reeks of design by committee. Get enough people in a room and soon something that is good to average is now not." I agree we try to get together to "make everyone happy" and well we end up making no one happy. This is a cruical decsion for these people to vote on and they should be proud of their new symbol of their country.
Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 10, 2015 6:43 PM

a flag is a strong national symbol. How strong? enough to have a change of heart on the black silver fern. This is where globally a crisis in one country can have an impact on what other countries do. New Zealand decided the colors were Isis colors and didn't want to send the wrong message. This reminds me of gang colors. It affects anything from colors of bandanas to professional sport wear. innocent sport fans have been targeted by gang members for the colors of their jersey.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 19, 2015 4:03 AM

To be honest I feel as though the changing of the new Zealand flag has more to do with outside opinion than their own. Two of the main reasons they wished to change their flag was to first be differentiated from Australia and two please the native population. Unfortunately when you have a long time it is very difficult to change because people identify with it. I personally think they should keep the old flag for they make their identity and culture not the flag. Also if they must choose it should be the second from the left since it looks the closest to the old flag keeping traditionalists happy while adding new elements. Plus the swirl one to be honest looks pretty bad.

Olivia Campanella's curator insight, December 14, 2018 11:42 PM
A flag is intended to represent a people and a government while also portraying a common heritage and a sense of timelessness. The symbols on the flags can be incredibly potent politically and culturally, which the Kiwi's aren't enthusiastic about.The four flags below are the final four flags they can choose from.
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How climate change is triggering a migrant crisis in Vietnam

How climate change is triggering a migrant crisis in Vietnam | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
The Vietnamese Mekong Delta is one of Earth’s most agriculturally productive regions and is of global importance for its exports of rice, shrimp and fruit. The 18 million inhabitants of this low-lying river delta are also some of the world’s most vulnerable to climate change.
Richard Aitchison's insight:
Original Article-
As we have moved from region to region we have seen migrantion being a key factor that has been discussed. Migration has been one of the central themes in the news for the past few years and well as people we have been migrating for years. This is an excellent and in depth article talking about the migrant crisis in Vietnam and especially the Mekong Delta. The Mekong Delta is one of Earths most productive regions and exports rice,shrimp and fruit. So why are people leaving then? As mentioned in the article and has been discussed previously people are moving towards more urban areas, so we see natural drift towards that. However, in this area its almost double the national average. About 24,000 people move out of the Mekong Delta per year and most have blamed it on Climate change in the area. First off some have just lost there homes as the area as eroded and been forced to move. Most though have moved for economic reasons has there has been an increase in flooding, droughts, and many other natural disasters.  Like many other areas in the world this region has suffered a possible economic crisis due to its climate. The are has been stricken by poverty, thus it has forced a migrant crisis into the cities of Vietnam. We must continue to look for soltions and keep exploring the why. A very good article and a worth while read.
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Singapore passport becomes 'most powerful' in the world

Singapore passport becomes 'most powerful' in the world | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it

Historically, the top ten most powerful passports in the world were mostly European, with Germany having the lead for the past two years. Since early 2017, Singapore has tied for number one position with Germany. For the first time ever an Asian country has the most powerful passport in the world. It is a testament of Singapore's inclusive diplomatic relations and effective foreign policy."

 

Tag: Singapore, SouthEastAsia, political, development.

Richard Aitchison's insight:
Very interesting to see a shift to Southeast Asia as some of the most powerful passports in the world. As the article states Singapore has now passed Germany as the most powerful passport. They rank this is having least amount of visa restrictions when traveling. It is very interesting to see Singapore move to the head of the line, while a country like America lack so far behind in this. As the article states its Singapores inclusive diplomatic realtions and effective foregin pocliy that has opened the doors for many of their citizens for travel. In the global world we live in it is very important to have a powerful passport that helps you travel freely. First off if you work in business its important to get country to country and can help create an economic boom possbily. Also, its always important to hold a powerful passport as a safety for your family even if its a second passport. It will be interesting to track to see if more Southeast Asian countries continue to move up the rankings and if America is ever able to surge back up the rankings.
David Stiger's curator insight, November 27, 2018 1:22 PM
This articles highlights the logistics and technical minutia of globalization in real life. When people think about people traveling, it is easy to forget that there are barriers such as visas. Depending on the prestige and status of a country, a passport can allow a traveler to enter a foreign land visa free or at least hassle free. As the world becomes more interdependent and borders lose their strict nationalistic rigidity, this ability to traverse freely and more easily is important. One might not think that the small nation of Singapore now has the most capable passport out of 195 countries worldwide. Once tied with Germany to access 158 countries visa-free, Singapore pulled ahead when Paraguay reduced its visa restrictions for Singapore. This serves as another sign that Asia and the "global south" is truly catching up to the Western world. As these other nations catch up to the West's development, even surpassing the West's premier status, people's attitudes will eventually change towards these Asian, African, and Latin American nations. The positive associations will attract more business and more travel giving rise to new opportunities and stronger globalized connections. In the end, Singapore's win over Germany in international travel is a victory for globalization. Now whether one thinks globalization is good or bad is another matter entirely. 
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 4:37 PM
The Singaporean passport is the most powerful passport in the world, which is a great tagline but what does it mean? Well, passports are created for you to travel between borders and usually to create to another country you need to obtain a visa, but if you have a passport from Singapore you now have the most visa-less passport in the world. Allowing you to travel more freely and will allow many people better opportunities. 
 
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 17, 2018 11:26 AM
Singapore has become the holder of the most powerful passport in the world. This means that people from this country has free access to the most countries around the world. America thought they had the most powerful visa in the world however that's the farthest from the truth. Since Donald Trump has become president America's visa has gone down even more while Singapore has been quietly climbing the totem pole.
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The Spice Trade's Legacy

The Spice Trade's Legacy | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it

"In its day, the spice trade was the world’s biggest industry. It established and destroyed empires and helped the Europeans (who were looking for alternate routes to the east) map the globe through their discovery of new continents. What was once tightly controlled by the Arabs for centuries was now available throughout Europe with the establishment of the Ocean Spice Trade route connecting Europe directly to South Asia (India) and South East Asia."

Richard Aitchison's insight:
A very insightful article and shows the uttermost importance of geography in many phases. First off, it shows the importance of  having key resources within your country or region. Southeast Asia is know for its spices which made it especially key during the age of exploration. Also, which is key is how do we get there? What are the best trade routes? Over the years, first the Romans then the Ottoman Empire controlled key lands in which connected Europe and Southeast Asia. Since, the Christian Europeans did not want to work with the Muslims  they found new trade routes and well eventually we end up discovering the New World (the Americas". This shows how everything like always connects. Southeast Asia, which for most of its time  has been colonized up until almost the mid 1980s is finally starting to grow on its own. It will be interesting to see how they use there own resources to try to gain traction in the global markets throughout the next few decades and it we see any smaller world powers come out of the area. The spice trade dominated thousands of years of trade, but Southeast Asia has many other key resources as well and it will be key for politicians and businesses in the future to capitalize on this into the future. 
Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, February 19, 2018 1:49 PM
History and AP Human Geography!  How has globalization changed the world? 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 2, 2018 3:06 AM
It is no exaggeration to say that the spice trade shaped the world as we know it today. Southeast Asia's location made it the only place in the world to obtain some of the most popular spices and other goods. Meanwhile Constantinople, being situated squarely between Europe and Asia, was the perfect middleman through which spices could get to markets in Europe -- where demand was high from Antiquity through the Middle Ages -- until the city fell to the Ottoman Empire and turned its back on Europe. This motivated Europeans to develop the sailing and navigational technology necessary to find sea routes to Asia, which led to the discovery of the Americas, and the rest is history. What followed were centuries of colonization, conflict, trade, and globalization on a scale the world had never seen before. All because people were crazy for spices that could only be found half-way around the world.
Corey Rogers's curator insight, December 15, 2018 8:22 PM
The spice trade not only opened up all the amenities Southeast Asia had to offer but spread their culture throughout Western Europe. It also opened up new routes for Europeans to explore Eastern Asia and then sail around the world. 
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Infographic: North Korea by the Numbers

Infographic: North Korea by the Numbers | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it

North Korea – a country hard to illustrate by numbers and those available are based on estimates. Accordingly, this graphic intends to give an overview on relevant aspects of a country hardly known by outsiders. Overall, we know little about the isolated northern part of the Korean peninsula and what we know is mostly disturbing: The DPRK’s government headed by Kim Jong-un has recently launched another missile test, adding up to 14 tests only in 2017.

Besides that, the country is estimated to be among the most militarised on the globe with more than a million active soldiers and an air force counting 944 aircrafts in total. Thus, North Korea is ranked 23rd (out of 133 countries) for military spending which approximately amounts to $7.5 billion per year. According to the CIA, young adults are obliged to spend several years in the military service, women around seven and men even ten years.

But above all, North Korea is a country that is desperately poor. Out of an estimated 25,115,311 inhabitants, only 36 percent of the population has access to electricity and the GDP per capita amounts to $1,700 – similar to that of South Sudan.

 

Tags: North Korea, infographic.

Richard Aitchison's insight:
North Korea is constantly in the news, but do we really know much about it. Before the US conflicts with Afghanistan and Iraq we all never very little about those countries. While we have had past history with North Korea, it is always good to understand the country and the people in the conflict. This is an easy info graphic to view and gives you simple knowledge on the country such as population, workforce number, military numbers, and other useful numbers that can be discussed.  As shown in the numbers military spending and military service time is a high priority which should not be a shocker if you ever turn on the news. However, one should also see that North Korea is a very poor country and most live in poverty. Very few have access to electricity and living conditions are not up to standards. So we can ask ourselves are the North Koreans spending money wisely? Well from this graphic probably not. We can begin to understand some of the issues (although there so many) with this country and why it can be a problem to the US and to the world.  A country basically run by a dictatorship with high military spending and a very high poverty rate is unacceptable. It would be fun to use other graphics on this page to begin to understand other countries as well, a good website to view. 
Christopher L. Story's curator insight, August 12, 2017 11:50 AM
'cause you know....Venezuela.  
GTANSW & ACT's curator insight, August 31, 2017 7:53 PM
Political geography: global challenges
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Hong Kong's 'coffin homes' reveal a housing crisis

Hong Kong's 'coffin homes' reveal a housing crisis | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
A shortage of developable land have pushed Hong Kong's housing prices skyward, leading some to live in spaces the size of closets.
Richard Aitchison's insight:
Now this is a major housing crisis. I thought apartments in NYC were small, but nothing like this. In Hong Kong they have what is called "coffin homes" they are stacked on top of each other to try to fit as many in as possible. With increasing population and just 7% of the land properly zoned for housing it caused a major crunch in the housing market. Currently prices are going for $1,350 per square foot. Obviously this is a major problem and causes living conditions to be brutal especially for the elderly or for families that have to split up due to space. So what to do to fix this problem? Well one would say just make more land available for housing, well that comes with problems as well. There probably is a reason that there is limited land for housing due to geographical issues. So yes we can build more homes, but would we run into new problems such as natural disasters that cause more debt for the people in the country. There definitely needs to be a solution for these people, but it might not be so simple. I will never go back to NYC now and say how small the apartments are, because well you could be in Hong Kong.
Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 2018 8:35 PM
The photo gallery in this article helps to give an accurate depiction of the housing crisis in Hong Kong with many people living in units that are 4 by 6 feet. Many families have to live in separate units because they are so small and can't usually fit more than one person. The bright side of the housing crisis in Hong Kong is that these "coffin homes" allow people to live in the major city at a cheaper cost, although it definitely comes with a hefty price with such tiny living quarters. The future looks positive though, as Hong Kong promises to build over 400,000 new homes over the next decade. This will help improve the housing crisis and hopefully phase these "coffin homes" out of existence once and for all.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, May 2, 2018 9:17 PM
(East Asia) Unlike Singapore's regimented government housing, Hong Kong faces a severe housing crisis, forcing hundreds of thousands of people to live in tiny 4 by 6 foot homes. Hong Kong has a population of 7.3 million but only 7% of the city is cleared for housing. Therefore, landlords have to get creative. Stacking these "coffin homes" one on top of another is a great way to save space while providing the bare minimum housing. The coffin homes, little more than closets, have no windows or room to move around. Skyrocketing housing prices have caused extremely dense buildings as the elderly, disabled, young, and poor are forced to move in.
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The great Korean bat flip mystery

The great Korean bat flip mystery | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
MLB's code is clear: Flip your bat and you'll pay. But in South Korea, flips are an art. How does this alternate world exist? And what does it say about us? Writer Mina Kimes trekked across South Korea with illustrator Mickey Duzyj to unravel the mystery.
Richard Aitchison's insight:
Baseball is America's pastime. It comes with a long history. If you are a baseball fan you have probably been lectured by an older family member about the history of this great game.  An there is no doubt you have heard about baseball's "unwritten" rules. One of these "rules" is to not show up the pitcher as a batter. One way in which we have seen this the past few seasons and especially a couple of years ago in the playoffs is the bat flip. The bat flip is a major no-no when it comes to baseball in America. However, in Korea it is commonplace. It is very strange to see how the Korean's play the game in such a contrast to the Americans. Korea and East Asia is usually known here in the West a quiet place that holds respect has an utter most importance. However, on the field they like to have fun. The Koreans learned the game from the Japanese when Japan's military held Korea. They learned the game and played the game with passion. The bat flip and other traditions became commonplace and have carried over just like baseball traditions here in America.  Baseball here in America has long look to regain its popularity with the youth and there seems to be  a push by younger players to bring more flare to the game. It has caused arguments among many of its older fans or players. So maybe we will see this Korean tradition used more in America soon, but for now it will remain controversial. 
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 20, 2018 12:11 PM
The unwritten rules of baseball are not static. They change from country to country and are influenced by the values and norm of the society in which the game is played. In South Korea, bat flips are seen as a way to celebrate your success at the plate. Also, it lends a feeling of individuality that rarely presents itself in a culture that values conformity over individuality. This mentality is totally different than in America where a bat flip is seen as disrespectful and showing up the opposing pitcher. In American baseball, the team is valued more than the individual, so if you act out to celebrate individual success, then you will face consequences the next time you come to the plate.
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 4:05 PM
First off who thinks of baseball in South Korea? I am not a huge baseball fan, but I do know that if you flip the bat in the MLB next time you're up to bat the pitcher will remember and you'll have a new baseball-sized bruise. Interestingly in the individualistic U.S. it is for all intents and purposes prohibited,  while in a very collective and respectful society such as South Korea you are expected to make a spectacle out of it. Cultures do many things differently and some subvert expectations. 
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Is Slumdog Millionaire a portrait of the real India or a stylishly shot collection of clichés?

Is Slumdog Millionaire a portrait of the real India or a stylishly shot collection of clichés? | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
"You wanted to see the real India? Here it is," the young Indian hero of Slumdog Millionaire tells an American couple, right after they find that thei
Richard Aitchison's insight:
Slumdog millionaire was a surprise hit and Oscar winner back in 2009. The movie much like its main character rose all the way to the top. However, are what we are watching the exact life of the slums.  India, which has Bollywood as opposed to the Hollywood of the West, is very proud of its heritage and does not often like to be critiqued by the Hollywood world.   Slumdog Millionaire is directed by an British man and backed by an American company and while most loved the movie, some in India were not big fans of it. They thought that the city itself was misrepresented, as they missed the middle class that lived in the city and also the term slumdog is not a term that people in the slums prefer. India's social economic issues are not put in the best of light in this film, and that is something that the natives are most angry about. They feel as if the West does not truly understand there world, and you can add into the fact that that being a former British colony that they feel like "big brother " is always trying to put them back down. However, if you have not seen the movie it is tremendous and I believe a must watch. There is much we can learn from the film, even if its not all correct. Maybe it will lead to us doing research on the topic and find out more. Overall, it has brought out many conversations and conversations is always a good place to start.
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How 'crisis mapping' is helping relief efforts in Nepal

How 'crisis mapping' is helping relief efforts in Nepal | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
A team of Nepalis, backed by groups around the world, are helping guide what aid is needed where by "crisis mapping" Nepal, reports Saira Asher.


Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics, mapping, geospatial.

Richard Aitchison's insight:
This is a great example of how using technology  can benefit people. In Nepal, in which they are an area where they can get many earthquakes, they used "crisis maps" to their advantage.  First off as the article state Nepal is a very difficult country to navigate and especially after the earthquake with roads being destroyed it could make it nearly impossible. With people in dire need of supplies they had to get creative. So here they used a software system called "OpenStreetMap."   It is, as described in the article, a Wikipedia for mapmakers. Basically, anyone can add to the map from an amateur to a professional map maker. By allowing everyone to help they were able to make more accurate maps and faster ways to reach someone that had a need for supplies, these became the crisis maps that they would use. Going into the future this software will continue to be important in Nepal as you can constantly edit the maps and continue to find better and more efficient ways to get to place to place. Other countries with these issues should look towards Nepal and take preemptive  action so that when a disaster does strike they will be ready and will not lose valuable  time right after a disaster. A very interesting article in which I did not previously know much about. 
LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 8, 2015 10:16 AM

Crisis are a symptom that something underneath the surface of normalcy is terribly wrong ... especially when we come to realize that everything is interconnected, even politics—worldwide.

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The area of this map coloured red has the same population as the area coloured blue

The area of this map coloured red has the same population as the area coloured blue | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
Well, this is kind of crazy. Only 5 per cent of the world's population lives in the regions of this map shaded blue. Another 5 per cent lives in the area shaded red. Yoinks.

 

Tags: population, density, South Asia.

Richard Aitchison's insight:
This map shows how much population is in one certain area. It is amazing to see all the land in the blue area which roughly adds up to 5% of the population, while that small area in red is also 5% of the worlds population. One can see just from the map some of the difficulties this might cause. The area in red has a major overpopulation problem and has a major need for resources for all of the people that live there. It also causes major divisions in socioeconomic and we tend to see many slum cities develop which on most likely built in poor geographical area. This can cause many issues in this area and we also see at the end of the article that with sea changes this could cause major problems in the near future in this area. If we were to see population move out of this area where would they go? We have major issues currently with a moving population in Europe, however it will be interesting to see where this population would move and how that would effect possible political policies of other South Asian countries. 
Carlos Fosca's curator insight, January 6, 2016 6:34 AM

Parece realmente una broma, pero la zona coloreada de rojo alberga a 350 millones de personas sobre una superficie que arroja una densidad poblacional de 1,062 habitantes por Km2. Si esto se compara con el país más densamente poblado de Europa, que es Holanda, con una densidad de 409 habitantes/Km2 o incluso con el departamento de Lima (269.1 habitantes /Km2) vemos que hay una gran diferencia. Pero el Perú también tiene propio su punto rojo en términos de densidad poblacional (no en términos de población absoluta). ¿Saben que lugar es este? Pues la provincia Constitucional del Callao que tiene una densidad poblacional de 7,159.83 habitantes/Km2 (2015).

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 5, 2018 2:19 PM
If someone looked at this map and didn't have background knowledge on the population distribution on earth, they would probably think this map is fake.  It's pretty unbelievable that one tiny spot of land has the same amount of people living on it than pretty much the rest of the entire world.  The biggest thing that this map indicates is that earth's population is not evenly distributed even a little bit.  This is partially because there are parts of the world that are uninhabitable, but that doesn't fully explain why so many people live in that tiny area.  The red spot also tells me that people living in that area are going to have a very different experience than most other humans.  Their resources are going to have to be divided thoroughly and they probably aren't going to get away with spending a lot of time without being in contact with other people.  The end of this article pointed out another big problem with this dense area of settlement- if something were to happen to this area which either wiped out resources or killed people, the earth's population would drop significantly in a really short period of time.  After looking at this, I regret how angry I used to be about sharing a room with my sister.  Now that I have my own bedroom I can see that I was actually pretty lucky, because at least I didn't have 5% of the world's population within a few hundred miles of me. 
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South Africa still counting the cost of the 2010 World Cup

South Africa still counting the cost of the 2010 World Cup | Rich's Geography Report | Scoop.it
South Africa's vuvuzelas will be quiet when the football World Cup kicks off in Sao Paulo on Thursday.
Richard Aitchison's insight:
It has now been 8 years since the first African World Cup which was hosted by South Africa. The article does a good job of showing how during the event and the immediate aftermath that country unity grew and that was a tangible affect of the people. However, (this article was written in 2014) by 2014 that had long worn off and many of the previous problems had returned. It also discusses economic fall out. How the South African people took the bill for 3.5 billion dollar projects. While the country benefited from these projects and infrastructure much of it is not useful for ordinary citizens and the argument can be made that the money should have gone more towards education or other development projects. The article paints a dark picture of the economic fall out from hosting the major event and it did not boost the area like it once thought that it could. They want to speak out to the world (Brazil at the time) and warn them of these over expensive projects and do not lead into the same trap. So does the World Cup and other major world events help an area? We have seen a boost in tourism in the area, but can we credit that event for that. These events are a morale boost for a country, however the problem is how can we measure that morale boost to a country, and how long does that last in a country. South Africa is a great test example for a major event like that. 
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