Regional Geography 200
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Gap says sorry for T-shirts with 'incorrect map' of China

Gap says sorry for T-shirts with 'incorrect map' of China | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it
The US retailer is the latest firm to anger China by not adhering to its territorial claims.

Via Seth Dixon
othni lindor's insight:
Retailers should be more mindful of the products they are producing. Retailers need to know the images and information they are putting out there. If companies are profiting off different cultures, they should be more respectful. 
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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, November 13, 2018 12:35 PM

Why would a company apologize to a country?  Does this mean that the company and its home country recognize the territorial claims that China makes?  What would be the political and economical consequences if Gap did not apologize?

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Russian Rocket Fails, and 2 Astronauts Make Safe Emergency Return - The New York Times

Russian Rocket Fails, and 2 Astronauts Make Safe Emergency Return - The New York Times | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it
The Soyuz craft experienced a problem minutes after liftoff, en route to the International Space Station, but the capsule landed safely.
othni lindor's insight:
This article talks about a rocket launch in Kazakhstan that failed several minutes after liftoff and both astronauts were able to land safely and neither of them had any injuries. The rocket had tons of explosive fuel on board. The two astronauts (one American and one Russian astronaut) had plenty of food, water, and air if anything bad happened. NASA is testing for further voyages on the moon and Mars.  
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In Russia, Epiphany Comes With A Shockingly Cold Swim

In Russia, Epiphany Comes With A Shockingly Cold Swim | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"Thousands of members of the Russian Orthodox Church marked Epiphany in January with a dip in freezing waters blessed by a cleric. Epiphany is a celebration of the baptism of Jesus Christ and the revelation of God as a human being in his form. Much like a baptism, the icy plunge is considered a purifying act of faith."

othni lindor's insight:
This article talks about epiphany. Epiphany is a holiday in the Russian Orthodox Church. It celebrates the baptism of Jesus in the River Jordan. Believers are baptized in freezing water through holes cut in the ice. Big cities like Moscow set up their own stations while smaller cities have a more do-it-yourself approach. The churches are decorated with a Christmas tree and it densely packed with people. The service for Epiphany can last for as many as four hours.    
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Matt Manish's curator insight, May 3, 2018 12:49 AM
Epiphany is a holiday in the Russian Orthodox Church that celebrates the baptism of Jesus in the Jordan River. You can see how dedicated the parishioners of this church are by how much they love taking the plunge into icy cold water every year. From this article, it seems as though the congregation of this religion in Russia don't dread this icy plunge, but instead they enjoy and look forward to it. Many seem to find it refreshing and as a sign of purification for the upcoming year. Although even after reading how some Russians describe this plunge as refreshing, I don't think I could bare the cold water on this holiday like these parishioners do. 
Matt Danielson's curator insight, October 22, 2018 5:58 PM
This is similar to a baptism done in both Catholic and protestant religious but with an added twist. As in often times and found through out history a regions religion is influenced by the environment( check Norse religion of Vikings or Christianity effects on the Irish for example) and the Eastern Orthodox religion in Russia is no different. Using the harsh environment in part of there religious rituals making the baptism more of a sense of acceptance and will, they do it in extremely cold waters to prove their allegiance to the religion and their determination to follow it. This must be a powerful experience full of emotion, pain, and afterwards group acceptance. 
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, November 1, 2018 11:19 AM
Epiphany must be an unbelievable experience for those who believe in the Russian Orthodox Church. In celebration of the Baptism of Jesus Christ in the River Jordan, Russian Orthodox members dip into the freezing waters blessed by clerics. The participants claim to feel cleansed after the whole experience. With hundreds of participants and many young people as well it is a testament to their faith in Russia Orthodox Church. 
 
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Why Ukraine needs Russia more than ever

Why Ukraine needs Russia more than ever | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it
As the country risks becoming a failed state, Kiev must recognise that economic survival depends on Moscow not the west
othni lindor's insight:
This article talks about Ukraine's want to be independent from Russia. Ukraine spent one winter without buying gas from Russia but instead from Europe which was significantly more expensive. As much as Ukraine wants to cut ties with Russia, it will be difficult to because for a very long time, Russia has been Ukraine's main trading partner and investor. Recently, living standards in Ukraine have gotten worse. Their economy has also collapsed recently. Ukraine has been borrowing money from Russia for many years. Getting rid of that debt will take some time. The Ukrainian president has plans to end manufacturing and industry in Ukraine and instead focus on promoting investment in information technologies and agriculture. Russia’s annexation of Crimea is the main reason for the economic collapse in Ukraine. 
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brielle blais's curator insight, April 1, 2018 1:43 PM
Ukraine's economy depends heavily on Russia, no matter how much they don't want to admit it. This shows the importance of relationships between countries, especially concerning the economy. The Ukraine cut ties with Russia and focus on the West, however, the Ukraine economy is seeing a lot of failure now. The country is dependent on Russia's commerce and support. 
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, October 28, 2018 3:40 PM
Its said that our most likely business partners aren't necessarily our best friends. Ukraine and Russia have been at odds with one another for many years. Ukraine wants to be completely independent from Russia meaning they want all ties severed from Russia, economically, politically etc. This is very hard for Ukraine to do because Russia has been there main trading partner and lender of money for years. So when Ukraine spent just one winter buying oil from Europe it contributed to the economy of Ukraine to fail. (The cost of gas was much higher than Russia's pricing). Ukraine has also borrowed a lot of money from Russia and this debt is going to take a very long time to pay back. For the time being Ukraine is dependent on Russia as much as they do not want to be.
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, November 1, 2018 10:25 AM
It's interesting to use such a leading title for this article. Whether or not all the numbers used to make their point that Ukraine should still do business with Russia are correct or misleading a fact is that Ukraine's president is allowing his own country's economy to fall out of spite. That is how tense the situation between the two countries are. Because Russia is Ukraine's major trading partner and Ukraine has attempted to cut ties with Russia, they are hurting themselves but does that mean Russia has their best interests?
 
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New rail routes between China and Europe will change trade patterns - Freight train coming

New rail routes between China and Europe will change trade patterns - Freight train coming | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it
ASTANA in Kazakhstan is one of the world’s most remote capitals, surrounded by thousands of kilometres of empty steppe. This summer Astana attempted to launch itself onto the global stage by hosting the World Expo, which closed on September 10th and underwhelmed many attendees. But there are other ways to have an impact.
othni lindor's insight:
The new Silk Railroad will run throughout Central Asia. It will also allow more rural regions the ability to trade more with other countries and creates jobs. The new Silk Railroad will create new routes for trade between China and Europe. 
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Human activities are reshaping Earth's surface

Human activities are reshaping Earth's surface | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate."

othni lindor's insight:
This map shows how human activities like farming has shaped the Earth's surface. The example they show is the Aral Sea. It is a 
regional environmental problem. It is located between the Southern part of Kazakhstan and Northern Uzbekistan. It used to be the world's fourth largest saline lake. Human activities have caused the lake to be almost completely dried up. Over the years, the Aral Sea became polluted with pesticides and chemicals. 


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Sally Egan's curator insight, February 14, 2016 5:45 PM

This is a great interactive showing change in a range of environments from 1990 to current as a result of human activities including agriculture, industry and urban expansion. The slide bar allows you to show differences in the location on a split image.

James Piccolino's curator insight, March 24, 2018 9:46 AM
Wow. This is depressing. I knew of the Aral sea thanks to class, but the others I had no idea. They were so green and lush way back in the day. Now they are dead and seriously in a sad state. There is nothing wrong with development and advancement, but this is just a lot when it comes to impact.
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, October 28, 2018 9:51 PM
The Aral Sea is a severe environmental issue in Central Asia. This map that we are looking at shows how human activities such as farming have destroyed a natural wonder. The Aral Sea USED to be the fourth largest saline lake but has dried up. The Aral Sea has five times less volume and is five times more saltier than it once was. This occurred because people surrounding the area used more water and used it more intensely. The soviets thought it would be a good idea to use more water projects such as planting cotton, and rice which are water intense crops. This severely dried up the Sea. The area that the sea once was that is now dry land in uninhabitable because of the levels of salt left behind. As well the rivers that connected to the Aral Sea have either dried out or are on the verge of drying out causing many economic problems for those that depended on that water.
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Alluvial Fans

Alluvial Fans | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"When a mountain stream carries a lot of sediment (clay, silt, sand, gravel, cobbles, and boulders) and leaves the confines of the canyon, the sediment is deposited. Over time, this process creates a fan-shaped deposit. The sediment is deposited not because the gradient of the stream decreased, but because the power of the stream dissipates beyond the canyon mouth as the water is spread thin and infiitrates. Many cities are built on alluvium fans, often leading to hazards from flash floods and mudflows."

othni lindor's insight:
This post explains when a mountain stream carries a lot of sediment and leaves a canyon, the sediment is deposited. "The sediment is deposited not because the gradient of the stream decreased, but because the power of the stream dissipates." Over time, it creates a fan-shaped deposit. This called an alluvial fan. Many cities are built on alluvium fans, which can cause flash floods and mud flows. Alluvial fans are found in deserts and humid regions.

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Olivia Campanella's curator insight, October 29, 2018 11:29 AM
What is an Alluvial Fan? 

An Alluvial fan is a fan or cone shaped deposit of sediments ( clay silt, sand, gravel, cobbles or boulders) that cross and build up in streams and over time creates this fan shaped deposit. The sediment is not deposited because the slope of the stream decreased, but because the power and velocity of the stream became too thin. Many villages and towns build around Alluvial fans but there is always often floods and mudflows.
Corey Rogers's curator insight, December 15, 2018 11:09 AM
The Alluvial Fans have a unique layout and supports the cities that have formed around it. Yes, there can be flash floods and mud-flows but the resources there keep the agriculture flourishing. 
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Macedonia Moves Ahead With Name Change, Helping Its NATO Bid - The New York Times

Macedonia Moves Ahead With Name Change, Helping Its NATO Bid - The New York Times | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it
In a tenuous victory for Prime Minister Zoran Zaev and his Western allies, Parliament voted to proceed with renaming the country the Republic of North Macedonia.
othni lindor's insight:
This article talks about Macedonia getting support from Parliament to keep a deal to change Macedonia's name to the Republic of North Macedonia so they can eventually join NATO. The push for a name change has been happening since the 90's after Macedonia declared independence from Yugoslavia. Lawmakers have a month to make those changes before it goes to Greek Parliament.

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The World Bank is eliminating the term “developing country” from its data vocabulary

The World Bank is eliminating the term “developing country” from its data vocabulary | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"In the 2016 edition of its World Development Indicators, the World Bank has made a big choice: It’s no longer distinguishing between 'developed' countries and “developing” ones in the presentation of its data. The change marks an evolution in thinking about the geographic distribution of poverty and prosperity. But it sounds less radical when you consider that nobody has ever agreed on a definition for these terms in the first place. The International Monetary Fund says its own distinction between advanced and emerging market economies “is not based on strict criteria, economic or otherwise.” The United Nations doesn’t have an official definition of a developing country, despite slapping the label on 159 nations. And the World Bank itself had previously simply lumped countries in the bottom two-thirds of gross national income (GNI) into the category, but even that comparatively strict cut-off wasn’t very useful."

othni lindor's insight:
This article explains how the World Bank is removing the term "developing country" from its data. This means that developed countries and developing countries all get lumped into one. This can change the way we view some countries compared to others. This can also help remove the stigma people have for certain countries. The downside to this is countries identify themselves differently from other countries and want to be identified as their own country. This can strip the identities of a country if it gets lumped together with another region or as one continent. 
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 29, 2017 3:06 AM

Global challenges: Development

James Piccolino's curator insight, February 8, 2018 6:51 AM
I agree that it is important to categorize in order to learn and group things together. I understand some of the implications but it is nonetheless important to the way we learn about other areas. To do away with all labels of this kind will not make the topic and world view more inclusive, but instead make things so complicated that people will either not understand it or not bother with it's complexities. Things need to be distinguished between qualities and traits in order for proper analysis. 
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When Rich Places Want to Secede

When Rich Places Want to Secede | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it
At the core of Catalonia’s separatist movement is an argument that a country’s better-off regions shouldn’t have to pay to cover their less productive counterparts.

 

As a relatively rich region with its own independence movement, Catalonia's not alone: A small set of secession movements in historically productive areas, most visibly in Europe, say they’d be better off on their own, and more are pointing to Catalonia's example to regain momentum.

The common wisdom used to be that separatist movements mostly came from weak minorities that rallied around racial or ethnic injustices. “With globalization, that changed significantly,” said Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics (LSE). “Virtually everywhere in the world,” movements have swapped out the “identity card” for the “economic card.”

Inequality between regions is baked into the entire concept of modern nationhood—if subsidizing poorer parts of a country were motivation enough to split off, every region would have done it by now. Plus, there are economic perks to staying together: Trade is easier across internal borders, and diversified regions diffuse risk.

 

Tags: Catalonia, economic, political, devolution, autonomy, Europe.

othni lindor's insight:
This article talks about the citizens of Catalonia wanting independence from Spain. Catalonia is one of the wealthiest regions in Spain. They contribute billions of dollars in taxes to Madrid. The citizens of Catalonia find it unfair that they have to help out poorer regions in Spain. However, if Catalonia was granted independence, it could lose up to 20% of their GDP overnight and this could also cause conflict. Many other countries are also following Catalonia's example in their separatist movement towards independence. 
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Taylor Doonan's curator insight, February 16, 2018 8:32 AM
This article is focused on Catalonia and its hopes for secession from Spain. Catalonia wants to secede because it pays in much more than it receives from the government. Catalonia is the wealthiest part of Spain with the exception of Madrid, and they feel as if they are paying to support the poorer regions of Spain, who they believe do not work as hard. The article also references other countries where wealth is unevenly distributed and how this can cause regions to want secession, it also outlines things that would need to happen for secession to be possible, for example another country offering military protection. In the case of Catalonia if they were to secede, what is left of Spain could plummet, they would lose 20% of their GDP overnight, which could cause massive problems for the country. Spain needs to begin preparing for if a Catalonian secession does in fact happen.  
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, September 5, 2018 3:43 PM
Interestingly, this is something going on all over the world in many different countries. As different regions find themselves separated by economic or social inequality they look to secede. These tensions increased in Catalonia, and in the UK, and is also growing as we see different proposals for California and Texas to secede from the United States. 
Matt Danielson's curator insight, October 3, 2018 3:45 PM
Catalonia separatist movement is one of the most prominent separatist movements in the world (along with Northern Ireland long standing issues). The people of Catalonia feel it is not fare for them to hold up the poorer areas of Spain, and wish for more autonomy. These economic reasons have pushed a large independence movement in the region of Catalonia. Against Spanish parliamentary wishes they attempted to hold a vote to secede. This vote was then broken up by force by Spanish police, and many were even arrested. Many fear this use of force could lead to more drastic measures of Catalonia independence. Though this most likely will not happen without heavy outside support.  
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Gap says sorry for T-shirts with 'incorrect map' of China

Gap says sorry for T-shirts with 'incorrect map' of China | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it
The US retailer is the latest firm to anger China by not adhering to its territorial claims.

Via Seth Dixon
othni lindor's insight:
Retailers should be more mindful of the products they are producing. Retailers need to know the images and information they are putting out there. If companies are profiting off different cultures, they should be more respectful. 
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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, November 13, 2018 12:35 PM

Why would a company apologize to a country?  Does this mean that the company and its home country recognize the territorial claims that China makes?  What would be the political and economical consequences if Gap did not apologize?

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Why everyone should take a geography class, especially now

Why everyone should take a geography class, especially now | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Geographical literacy remains vital—particularly for those of us who live in (for the time being at least) the world’s preeminent military and economic superpower. Geography is necessary for understanding why the overthrow of a government in Libya contributed to an unprecedented surge of migrants into Europe, why Ukraine has been split between East and West amid its conflict with Russia, and why China’s neighbors are alarmed at the new islands under construction in the South China Sea. And as we learned during last year’s Ebola panic, an understanding of African geography could have helped explain why an outbreak in West Africa should not lead to the quarantining of people from Kenya or Tanzania. In the years to come, as the effects of climate change on everything from sea level rise to deforestation to drought quite literally reshape the world we live in, an understanding of geography will be necessary for mitigating and adapting to the consequences.
othni lindor's insight:
This article talks about the importance of geography as part of education. Geography is important because everyone needs to be aware of what is happening in their own backyards but also the world. Geography helps us better understand government. 
Schools need to do a better job of how we view and talk about other countries. Geographical literacy is a big problem now and affects more young people than other age groups. The United States is a major military and economic power. Understanding the U.S.'s role in military and economy especially compared to other countries is very important to residents living in the U.S. It is important to know about other countries now rather than when a conflict occurs between the U.S. and that particular country. 
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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, October 7, 2015 7:39 AM

Geographical literacy

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The U.S. Is Pumping All This Oil, So Where Are The Benefits?

The U.S. Is Pumping All This Oil, So Where Are The Benefits? | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it
America has joined Saudi Arabia and Russia as one of the world's leading oil producers. Forecasters predicted this would usher in a golden age. It hasn't worked out that way.

 

Tags: environment, resources, economic.

othni lindor's insight:
This article talks about how the United States has become one of the world's leaders in oil production. Saudi Arabia and Russia are the other world leaders of oil production. This surge in oil production in the United States began in 2008. This surge will dramatically increase the U.S. economy and help revive the manufacturing field. This also helps bring the cost of gas down. 
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The fate of religious freedom in the former USSR, 25 years after its collapse

The fate of religious freedom in the former USSR, 25 years after its collapse | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it
It's been 25 years since the fall of the Soviet Union. How has religious freedom fared in this part of the world?
othni lindor's insight:
This article talks about religious groups after the end of the Soviet Union. During the time of the Soviet Union, religion was not allowed in public or private. Faith leaders were sent to labor camps and religious buildings were destroyed. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, newly created religious groups were hopeful. However, many countries post-Soviet Union still had paranoia towards religion. Orthodox Christian leaders put pressure on countries formerly in the Soviet Union which caused religiously motivated terrorism in those countries. Orthodox Christianity is the dominant religion in post-Soviet countries. Orthodox leaders have become powerful politically and don't give new religious groups the opportunity to grow. Countries that have a diverse religious population have been able to coexist peacefully between government and religious groups.  


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David Stiger's curator insight, October 22, 2018 10:20 AM
For post-Soviet countries, power and fear might be freedom's greatest challenges. On one hand, there is a dominant religious institution -  Eastern Orthodox Christianity - seeking to grow its influence and power. This might be a goal for a religion that is not popular elsewhere around the world (many Americans only know of Protestants and Roman Catholics, completely oblivious to the third major branch). They may see their geographic location as especially important - serving as a home-base of spiritual operations to launch evangelical missions, build coalitions, and influence national policies that shape society in a way their particular brand of Christianity approves of. On the other hand is fear of extremist groups which have resorted to terrorism to achieve their objectives. Countries like Russia, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Tajikistan, and Azerbaijan have all placed restrictions on minority faiths, such as Muslims and Protestants, requiring these groups to register with the state. Geographically, the Islamic world, which is in a constant state of turmoil, lies directly south of the post-Soviet Union, making Islam a key focus as immigrants and ideas easily flow into the region. This need for state approval is a form of control which clearly hampers independence and freedom of expression.  The irony in all of this is that fear of extremism leads to more extreme measures of security. This toxic process will only sow discord, distrust, and animosity between sub-populations leading to civil unrest.  




Matt Danielson's curator insight, October 22, 2018 5:49 PM
It is not surprising to me as a history major that they is still suppression of religious freedom in many former soviet territories. The more westernized countries have less of an issue than the countries farther from the west. This is partially due to them wanting to join Nato which requires religious freedom for joining. The more Islamic countries to the south seem to have the most difficulties with religious freedoms (as do a majority of Islamic nations). Russia would also have some problems from years of atheism being forced by the communist party. Somehow the Eastern Orthodox religion was able to hold on through out it all, but they seem to be the only;y religion openly accepted in Russia.  
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, November 1, 2018 10:45 AM
After years and years of suppression under the Atheistic USSR, many would not be unreasonable to have believed that when the USSR fell they would be able to practice their religion however they would like. Unfortunately, nothing changes in a day and when fear is a tactic learned from their former occupiers. Many countries still use the growing terrorism in the region to suppress their own citizen's rights to religious freedom.  Countries such as Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan are of great concern where Religious minorities, mainly Muslims, are rounded up and registered, monitored during religious practices or severely restricted. It is not a surprise that this is happening is former-USSR countries, but you must understand it takes time for deeply rooted behaviors to change. 
 
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One Place, Two Names

One Place, Two Names | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it
The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, as is the case here.
othni lindor's insight:
This article talks about how the "government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan." Usually when two groups or more have different names for the same place there is a political or cultural conflict happening in that country. 
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Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:11 AM

It is important to recognize that in a country so big, not everywhere is going to be the same. There is the city, the colder region, the dryer region, the warmer region, rural area etc. It is important to know that cultures are different as well. Some people refer to the red highlighted area s Xinjiang, but others call it Eastern Turkistan. Clearly, there are some cultural and political issues that reside in this area. The big concern is that the area is bordered to Central Asia and Eastern Asia as it has more Central and Eastern Asia characteristics as the people speak Turkic language and are predominantly Muslim. This goes to show that the Uygurs in this area are struggling to gain political power from China. Could there be a possible autonomy fight for this region? would it be politically and economically stable to stand on its own? 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:45 PM

it seems that this a a recurring theme with china. disputed lands surround this country inside and out, they claim to own all of it as well. but when the people that live their claim to be independent and choose not to associate themselves with you than it creates and interesting dynamic.

James Piccolino's curator insight, March 24, 2018 9:52 AM
Very interesting. I am curious to know where this will lead to. There is something also unnerving about how most of us are never taught this in public schools even though it is a very big and very important topic. I can not image there being a split eventually over time, though there is no way that this area will stay as they are with the treatment of their government. This is surely a region to keep an eye on.
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Tibetans Fight to Salvage Fading Culture in China

Tibetans Fight to Salvage Fading Culture in China | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"When officials forced an informal school run by monks near here to stop offering language classes for laypeople, Tashi Wangchuk looked for a place where his two teenage nieces could continue studying Tibetan.  To his surprise, he could not find one, even though nearly everyone living in this market town on the Tibetan plateau here is Tibetan. Officials had also ordered other monasteries and a private school in the area not to teach the language to laypeople. And public schools had dropped true bilingual education in Chinese and Tibetan, teaching Tibetan only in a single class, like a foreign language, if they taught it at all."

othni lindor's insight:
This article talks about Tibetan culture fading in China. The language has been removed from schools and are only taught as a foreign language if they are even taught at all. China has reduced and restricted the teaching of languages spoken by other ethnic groups in many regions more recently. In 2012, officials created a new teaching curriculum that removed Tibetan as a language. Schools were forced to use Chinese as the main language.  
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Jerry Li's curator insight, March 20, 2016 9:23 AM

 Yes, Tibatan will be very upset.

I think we should preserve every culture, not only chinese culture.

Tibetan is their mother tongue.  As every culture has its own special characteristic.

"And public schools had dropped true bilingual education in Chinese and Tibetan" this quote shows Tibetan cannot learn both language.

  The officials cannot forced them to learn chinese, and should give Tibetan a bilingual education just like Singapore.

This will result that Tibatan's children do not know their mother tongue and lost that culture gradually.

Although this can assimilate Tibetan to become Chinese in future but I think the offcials can give TIbetan some choices to choose.

Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, December 14, 2018 3:43 PM
The people of Tibet are watching their culture fade away and have no power to stop it. The Chinese officials that run the province have been restricting the teaching of the language and culture in Tibet and other western provinces of China. This is part of a massive plan to force the assimilation of the Tibetan and Uyger peoples to East China's Han Chinese norms. While some welcome the change thinking it will bring their children into the competitive economy, others have begun protesting the suppression. China has begun demonizing western forces and the Dalai Lama for tricking the protestors into defying the law and government.  As even monasteries are begin banned from teaching courses it will be a long battle for Tibetans who are fighting for their cultural freedom. 
 
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Kazakhstan to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet

Kazakhstan to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"Kazakh was written in Arabic script until 1920 when it was substituted by the Latin alphabet. In 1940, it was replaced by a Cyrillic one. 'Given that over 100 countries in the world use the Latin script, it is crucial for Kazakhstan's integration into the global educational and economic environment,' said Gulnar Karbozova.

The former Soviet Republic declared independence in 1991. Its state language is Kazakh, a member of the Turkic family.

Yet, Russian is widely spoken across Kazakhstan and is its second official language."

othni lindor's insight:
This article talk about Kazakhstan's decision to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet. Kazakhstan is the second official language in Russia. "Kazakh was written in Arabic script until 1920 when it was substituted by the Latin alphabet. In 1940, it was replaced by a Cyrillic one. The current Cyrillic alphabet consists of 42 characters - 33 characters of the Russian alphabet and nine characters for specific Kazakh sounds. The plan for the switch to Latin reportedly centers on an alphabet of 32 letters, with some specific sounds of the Kazakh language to be covered with the use of apostrophes." This change will take time for everyone to adjust and makes it harder for someone who is learning the language. The whole country will have to makes changes to adjust to the new alphabet. 
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Olivia Campanella's curator insight, October 29, 2018 11:39 AM
In this article it is explained how Kazakhstan is to switch from a Cyrillic alphabet to a Latin one. Kazakhstan President, Nursultan Narzarbeyeu signed a decree stating the switch of the country's alphabet from Cyrillic to Latin. Uzbekistan and Azerbaijan have already switched theirs. Kazakh was written in Arabic in the 1920's until it was switched to Latin. In the 1940's the Latin alphabet was replaced with a Cyrillic one. 
Matt Danielson's curator insight, October 30, 2018 11:29 PM
The culture of Kazakhstan has had so many different regions influencing it over the years it has affected and changed its language, writing, and culture overall. The originally wrote in san script (Arabic influence) then in Cryillic(in influence from Eastern Europeans south Eastern Europeans  Now to Latin (under western cultural influence). 
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, November 1, 2018 11:42 AM
Kazakhstan's President has signed a decree to switch the official alphabet from Cyrillic to Latin. They are just one of several ex-soviet nations who has switched to the Latin alphabet. It will be extremely hard to do and will take a lot of time, but it is not the first time Kazakh has been changed. Originally it was written in Arabic, switches to Latin in 1920 and in 1940 replaced by the Cyrillic one. Think about why they want to change to a Latin Alphabet. Are they attempting to move away from Russia's sphere of influence to become more involved with the west?
 
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Brexit, UK, Great Britain, and England

"An update of an earlier sketch we did before Brexit, the situation has become a little more unclear since."

othni lindor's insight:
This video helped explain Brexit and the countries that will be affected by it. It also helped explain the difference between all the countries in the United Kingdom including: England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland. This is an important video because of Brexit. Many people are confused about what Brexit actually is and what effect it will have on other countries in the U.K. This video clears it up and makes it easier to understand.
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Taylor Doonan's curator insight, February 15, 2018 7:14 PM
This video quickly defines the different terminologies that can be used to define England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, and Ireland. The different terms include England, for England, Great Britain, when talking about England, Scotland and Wales, and the United Kingdom when talking about England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. The video also talks about  how in different sporting events this group of countries competes differently, sometimes they are Great Britain, sometimes the United Kingdom, sometimes the countries compete individually sometimes Northern Ireland competes with Ireland. This video described all these differences very well. 
Corey Rogers's curator insight, December 15, 2018 12:53 AM
Britain's exit from the the EU has made trying to understand it very unclear and mostly confusing. Since Ireland is apart of these islands and seeks the joining of the EU but since being inside the UK gives them a hard chance of joining with UK;s push of leaving. 
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Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011)

Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011) | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it
The map provides a level of detail previously unavailable. It is the first ever to collect data published by all of Europe’s municipalities.
othni lindor's insight:
This article shows the population patterns of Europe between 2001 and 2011. Many cities have had a high rise in average annual population of 2 percent or more. This map also shows that there has been more migration in northwest Europe. Citizens have left certain cities in search of better job opportunities. The population in Germany is sparse except in Berlin. Spain has had a big drop in population overall. Many people living in more rural regions have moved to cities and many others are moving to coasts for retiring or downsizing.
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Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 2018 1:34 PM
This article looks at Europe’ s changing population. Although many cities, like Prague and Bucharest have been experiencing a 1-2% population increase, other countries, such as countries in the east and northwest, have had a 1-2% decrease in population. Similarly, Turkey has a declining population as well. The author of this article argues that this steady decline is occurring because the citizens are leaving the rural countryside to find more job opportunities in the cities.
Olivia Campanella's curator insight, October 1, 2018 4:35 PM
Europe has been undergoing intense demographic change and this map is the first ever collect data published by Europe. How this map works:

The Dark Blue color shows average annual population fall of 2% or more

The Medium Blue shows the average annual population fall of between 1 and 2%

and Light Blue shows a fall of 1%. The areas in tan experienced no change at all.

Areas in Deep Red show a rise of 2% or more in population, while in areas of Medium Red (1-2%) and Pale Pink (1%).
K Rome's curator insight, October 6, 2018 7:31 PM
Europe has been undergoing intense demographic change and this map is the first ever collect data published by Europe. How this map works:

The Dark Blue color shows average annual population fall of 2% or more

The Medium Blue shows the average annual population fall of between 1 and 2%

and Light Blue shows a fall of 1%. The areas in tan experienced no change at all.

Areas in Deep Red show a rise of 2% or more in population, while in areas of Medium Red (1-2%) and Pale Pink (1%).
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The Fate of One House is Igniting a Debate About Preservation in Singapore

The Fate of One House is Igniting a Debate About Preservation in Singapore | Regional Geography 200 | Scoop.it

The question of whether to demolish the home of the city-state’s former leader raises questions in a country that paves over the past.  In a country built on hyper-modernism and wealth, is anything worth saving that doesn't serve the vision of these ideals?  


Via Seth Dixon
othni lindor's insight:
I think that keeping the house helps others remember the history of the country and shows how far Singapore has come. Preserving history is very important. 
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Geo-economics of the Thai Canal

A group of influential Thai officials is promoting the construction of a long-envisioned megaproject, known as the Thai Canal. If built, it would transform the regional maritime dynamics and give Thailand a substantial stake in global trade. Yet, as ambitious as the project it, there are equally credible drawbacks that could reshape the geo-economic fortunes of Southeast Asia.
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dustin colprit's curator insight, September 5, 2018 2:50 PM
Thailand wants to build a canal to increase its position in Global trade.
Jessica Martel's curator insight, September 5, 2018 2:51 PM
I'm curious to see how this will effect the economics of south east Asia. Although it will give Thailand a great opportunity to grow, how will this create issues for other regions?
Olivia Campanella's curator insight, September 5, 2018 2:53 PM
The Thai Canal could impact Thailand and  make transportation throughout South East Asia so much easier.