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Raspberry Pi Webserver

Raspberry Pi Webserver | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The Need We host free seminars on backup & recovery and virtualization each year.  We decided to lessen our paper dependency this year and provide the presentations via a pdf file instead of a ...
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Raspberry Pi
A complete ARM GNU/Linux computer for $25.
(also covering Arduino and BeagleBone)
Curated by F. Thunus
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Dear reader,

Dear reader, | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it

The Raspberry Pi project website is http://www.raspberrypi.org/

This is one of my news digests. If you like my editorial choices, there are more to be found by clicking on the "dear reader" link, and on my name above.
Enjoy !

Donald Thomas's curator insight, August 30, 2014 8:07 AM

this is 

Wuzea Recherche's comment, March 15, 2015 6:45 AM
Propose de rechercher une ressource en tapant un mot clé dans le champ de recherche. Wuzea : http://www.wuzea.com
Vasu10's curator insight, June 9, 2021 1:49 AM
Takeoff projects help students complete their academic projects. Register at takeoff projects today to find and learn about different interesting big data projects and grab the best jobs. Get started right now.
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ESP8266 NTP Client TM1637

ESP8266 NTP Client TM1637 | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
ESP 8266 -- TM1637GPIO 0 -- DIOGPIO 2 -- CLKVCC 3.3v -- VCCGND -- GND #include <NTPClient.h> #include <ESP8266WiFi.h> #include <WiFiUdp.h> #include <TM1637Display.h> // #define CLK 2 // Define the connections pins: #define DIO 0 TM1637Display display = TM1637Display(CLK, DIO); // Create display object...
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PiTalk 4G IoT HAT for Raspberry Pi

PiTalk 4G IoT HAT for Raspberry Pi | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Raspberry Pi enthusiasts may be interested in a new 4G IoT HAT specifically created for the excellent range of Raspberry Pi mini PC systems in the form of...
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Control Electronics Through Your WiFi Web Browser By Using Arduino Nano 33 IOT

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ARMedONE Cluster board supports up to 28x Popular Computer Modules

ARMedONE Cluster board supports up to 28x Popular Computer Modules | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The ARMedOne is a carrier board in E-ATX form-factor that can handle popular SO-DIMM computer modules like the Raspberry Pi CM3/CM4, Jetson Nano/Xavier/TX2 NX, NXP iMX8, etc. The product is expected to be released around mid-December 2022 on Kickstarter.
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XBee Zigbee SMT (U.FL Antenna) XB24CZ7UIS-004 - Buy and Sell Hardware Products, DIY Electronics and Kits, HuaQiangBei Online Store - PCBWay

XBee Zigbee SMT (U.FL Antenna) XB24CZ7UIS-004 - Buy and Sell Hardware Products, DIY Electronics and Kits, HuaQiangBei Online Store - PCBWay | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Digi International, RF TXRX MODULE 802.15.4 U.FL ANTPart number:XB24CZ7UIS-004XBee & XBee-PRO ZB RF ModulesDIGI XBee and XBee-PRO ZB RF Modules are embedded SMT RT Modules that provide wireless co...
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PiTalk 4G HAT for Raspberry Pi / 4G USB dongle targets M2M and IoT applications (Crowdfunding)

PiTalk 4G HAT for Raspberry Pi / 4G USB dongle targets M2M and IoT applications (Crowdfunding) | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
PiTalk is a 4G cellular connectivity solution based on Quectel EG25-G LTE Cat 4 module...
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Raspberry pi with New Blynk2.0 IoT | How to Start? | DHT11 with New Blynk2.0

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Learn about the Internet of Things

Learn about the Internet of Things | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
If you are searching for an easy way to learn more about electronics and start building Internet of Things projects you might be interested in a new...
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Installing Mastodon on the Raspberry Pi #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi « Adafruit Industries – Makers, hackers, artists, designers and engineers!

Installing Mastodon on the Raspberry Pi #piday #raspberrypi @Raspberry_Pi « Adafruit Industries – Makers, hackers, artists, designers and engineers! | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
via PiMyLifeUp Mastodon is a free and open-source software that allows you to self-host your own social network on your Raspberry Pi.This software is a microblogging platform that is very much lik…...
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Raspberry Pi Transforms Its IQAudio HATs Eco-friendly - Updates 4 Devs

Raspberry Pi Transforms Its IQAudio HATs Eco-friendly - Updates 4 Devs | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Raspberry Pi has actually overhauled most of its audio attachments, changing the formerly black PCBs of the HATs with environment-friendly ones to match the...
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Banana Pi BPI-R3 OpenSource Routerboard how to burn and test image

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Programming an ATtiny85, Part 1: Using C with a USBtinyISP (Shallow Thoughts)

Programming an ATtiny85, Part 1: Using C with a USBtinyISP (Shallow Thoughts) | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Programming an ATtiny85, Part 1: Using C with a USBtinyISP Arduinos are great for prototyping, but for a small, low-power, cheap and simple design, an ATtiny chip seems like just the ticket. For just a few dollars you can do most of what you could with an Arduino and use a lot of the same code, as long as you can make do with a little less memory and fewer pins. I've been wanting to try them, and recently I ordered a few ATtiny85 chips. There are quite a few ways to program them. You can buy programmers specifically intended for an ATtiny, but I already had a USBtinyISP, a chip used to program Arduino bootloaders, so that's what I'll discuss here. Wiring to the USBtinyISP The best reference I found on wiring was Using USBTinyISP to program ATTiny45 and ATTiny85. That's pretty clear, but I made my own Fritzing diagram, with colors, so it'll be easy to reconstruct it next time I need it. The colors I used: MISO yellow VCC red SCK white MOSI green RESET orangeor red/black GND black Programming the ATtiny in C I found a couple of blink examples at electronut.in, Getting Started with ATtiny AVR programming, and in a Stack Exchange thread, How to program an AVR chip in Linux Here's some basic blink code: #include <avr/io.h> #include <util/delay.h> int main (void) { // Set Data Direction to output on port B, pins 2 and 3: DDRB = 0b00001000; while (1) { // set PB3 high PORTB = 0b00001000; _delay_ms(500); // set PB3 low PORTB = 0b00000000; _delay_ms(500); } return 1; } Then you need a Makefile. I started with the one linked from the electronut page above. Modify it if you're using a programmer other than a USBtinyISP. make builds the program, and make install loads it to the ATtiny. And, incredibly, my light started blinking, the first time! Encouraged, I added another LED to make sure I understood. The ATtiny85 has six pins you can use (the other two are power and ground). The pin numbers correspond to the bits in DDRB and PORTB: my LED was on PB3. I added another LED on PB2 and made it alternate with the first one: DDRB = 0b00001100; [ ... ] // set PB3 high, PB2 low PORTB = 0b00001000; _delay_ms(500); // set PB3 low, PB2 high PORTB = 0b00000100; _delay_ms(500); Timing Woes But wait -- not everything was rosy. I was calling _delay_ms(500), but it was waiting a lot longer than half a second between flashes. What was wrong? For some reason, a lot of ATtiny sample code on the web assumes the chip is running at 8MHz. The chip's internal oscillator is indeed 8MHz (though you can also run it with an external crystal at various speeds) -- but its default mode uses that oscillator in "divide by eight" mode, meaning its actual clock rate is 1MHz. But Makefiles you'll find on the web don't take that into account (maybe because they're all copied from the same original source). So, for instance, the Makefile I got from electronut has CLOCK = 8000000 If I changed that to CLOCK = 1000000 now my delays were proper milliseconds, as I'd specified. Here's my working attiny85 blink Makefile. In case you're curious about clock rate, it's specified by what are called fuses, which sound permanent but aren't: they hold their values when the chip loses power, but you can set them over and over. You can read the current fuse settings like this: avrdude -c usbtiny -p attiny85 -U lfuse:r:-:i -v which should print something like this: avrdude: safemode: hfuse reads as DF avrdude: safemode: efuse reads as FF avrdude: safemode: Fuses OK (E:FF, H:DF, L:62) To figure out what that means, go to the Fuse calculator, scroll down to Current settings and enter the three values you got from avrdude (E, H and L correspond to Extended, High and Low). Then scroll up to Feature configuration to see what the fuse settings correspond to. In my case it was Int. RC Osc. 8 Mhz; Start-up time PWRDWN/RESET; 6CK/14CK+ 64ms; [CKSEL=1011 SUT=10]; default value and Divide clock by 8 internally; [CKDIV8=0] was checked. More on ports and pins There's more info on ATtiny ports in ATTiny Port Manipulation (Part 1): PinMode() and DigitalWrite() Nobody seems to have written much about AVR/ATTINY programming in general. Symbols like PORTB and functions like _delay_ms() come from files in /usr/lib/avr/include/, at least on my Debian system. There's not much there, so if you want library functions to handle nontrivial hardware, you'll have to write them or find them somewhere else. As for understanding pins, you're supposed to go to the datasheet and read it through, all 234 pages. Hint: for understanding basics of reading from and writing to ports, speed forward to section 10, I/O Ports. A short excerpt from that section: Three I/O memory address locations are allocated for each port, one each for the Data Register - PORTx, Data Direction Register - DDRx, and the Port Input Pins - PINx. The Port Input Pins I/O location is read only, while the Data Register and the Data Direction Register are read/write. However, writing a logic one to a bit in the PINx Register, (comma sic) will result in a toggle in the corresponding Data Register. In addition, the Pull-up Disable - PUD bit in MCUCR disables the pull-up function for all pins in all ports when set. There's also some interesting information there about built-in pull-up resistors and how to activate or deactivate them. That's helpful, but here's the part I wish they'd said: PORTB (along with DDRB and PINB) represents all six pins. (Why B? Is there a PORTA? Not as far as I can tell; at least, no PORTA is mentioned in the datasheet.) There are six output pins, corresponding to the six pins on the chip that are not power or ground. Set the bits in DDRB and PORTB to correspond to the pins you want to set. So if you want to use pins 0 through 3 for output, do this: DDRB = 0b00001111; If you want to set logical pins 1 and 3 (corresponding to pins 6 and 2 on the chip) high, and the rest of the pins low, do this: PORTB = 0b00001010; To read from pins, use PINB. In addition to basic functionality, all the pins have specialized uses, like timers, SPI, ADC and even temperature measurement (see the diagram above). The datasheet goes into more detail about how to get into some of those specialized modes. But a lot of those specialties are easier to deal with using libraries. And there are a lot more libraries available for the Arduino C++ environment than there are for a bare ATtiny using C. So the next step is to program the ATtiny using Arduino ... which deserves its own article. Tags: hardware, arduino, programming [ 18:01 Nov 02, 2017 More hardware | permalink to this entry | ]
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Simple Low-Cost Inverter

Simple Low-Cost Inverter | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
There are different types of inverters available in market, but their circuits are generally complex, so their cost is high. Here is a proposed low-cost inverter circuit based on MOSFET IRF250, which can also be used as an emergency light.
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How to make an automatic dog feeder with Arduino and Linux

How to make an automatic dog feeder with Arduino and Linux | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Try this DIY project to learn (or teach your family) to write code that interfaces with real hardware.
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ESP32 LoRa Gateway For Data Monitoring

ESP32 LoRa Gateway For Data Monitoring | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
In a boiler safety project, we collect 32 thermocouple readings from the depth of a 500MW boiler second pass area, where ambient temperature on a normal day is 65 to 70°C due to hot area leakages in the vicinity.
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ArduinoBLE - Arduino Reference

ArduinoBLE - Arduino Reference | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The Arduino programming language Reference, organized into Functions, Variable and Constant, and Structure keywords.
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Youtube Counter Esp8266+ws2812b+st7735

Youtube Counter Esp8266+ws2812b+st7735 | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Youtube Counter Esp8266+ws2812b+st7735: I just started a YouTube channel. So went to study how to make money. Since I am still studying, I want to earn money by myself without relying on my parents.therefore obtaining information that must be The number of followers reached 1000 people, …...
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Raspberry Pi: Working with a GPIO Extension Board

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Smoke & Gas Leakage Detector using Arduino - MQ2 sensor & OLED Display

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Remote Everactive sensor activation via the Arduino Cloud

Remote Everactive sensor activation via the Arduino Cloud | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
An over-engineered solution to activate an Everactive Self-Powered motion sensor remotely using the Arduino Cloud. Find this and other hardware projects on Hackster.io.
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Arduino Wireless Motion Capture System - v0.2 Prototype Connected To Houdini

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