Quorum sensing
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Biofilm Formation in Different Salmonella Serotypes Isolated from Poultry. - PubMed - NCBI

Biofilm Formation in Different Salmonella Serotypes Isolated from Poultry. - PubMed - NCBI | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
Curr Microbiol. 2018 Dec 17. doi: 10.1007/s00284-018-1599-5.[Epub ahead of print]...
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Home | Journal of Bacteriology

Home | Journal of Bacteriology | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
1 2 Editorial Free Editorial Acknowledgment of Ad Hoc Reviewers Thomas J. Silhavy Spotlight Free Spotlight Articles of Significant Interest in This Issue Commentaries Free Commentary Getting Our Fingers on the Pulse of Slow-Growing Bacteria in Hard-To-Reach Places Chronic infections with slow-growing pathogens have plagued humans throughout history. However, assessing the identities and growth rates of bacteria in an infection has remained an elusive goal. Tara Gallagher, Joann Phan, Katrine Whiteson Free Commentary The Expanding Molecular Genetics Tool Kit in Chlamydia Chlamydia has emerged as an important model system for the study of host pathogen interactions, in part due to a resurgence in the development of tools for its molecular genetic manipulation. An additional tool, published by Keb et al. Raphael H. Valdivia, Robert J. Bastidas Research Articles Research Article | Spotlight Role and Function of Class III LitR, a Photosensor Homolog from Burkholderia multivorans Members of the LitR/CarH family are adenosyl B12-based photosensory transcriptional regulator involved in light-inducible carotenoid production in nonphototrophic bacteria. Our study provides the first evidence of the involvement of a class III LitR, which lacks an adenosyl B12-binding domain in the light response of Burkholderia multivorans... Satoru Sumi, Hatsumi Shiratori-Takano, Kenji Ueda, Hideaki Takano Open Access Research Article | Spotlight A Subset of Exoribonucleases Serve as Degradative Enzymes for pGpG in c-di-GMP Signaling The bacterial bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling molecule regulates complex processes, such as biofilm formation. c-di-GMP is degraded in two-steps, linearization into pGpG and subsequent cleavage to two GMPs. The 3′-to-5′ exonuclease oligoribonuclease (Orn) serves as the enzyme that degrades pGpG in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Many phyla contain species... Mona W. Orr, Cordelia A. Weiss, Geoffrey B. Severin, Husan Turdiev, Soo-Kyoung Kim, Asan Turdiev, Kuanqing Liu, Benjamin P. Tu, Christopher M. Waters, Wade C. Winkler, Vincent T. Lee Open Access Research Article Planktonic Interference and Biofilm Alliance between Aggregation Substance and Endocarditis- and Biofilm-Associated Pili in Enterococcus faecalis Most bacteria express multiple adhesins that contribute to surface attachment and colonization. However, the network and relationships between the various adhesins of a single bacterial species are less well understood. Here, we examined two well-characterized adhesins in Enterococcus faecalis, aggregation substance and endocarditis- and biofilm-associated pili, and... Irina Afonina, Xin Ni Lim, Rosalind Tan, Kimberly A. Kline Free Research Article Refining the Application of Microbial Lipids as Tracers of Staphylococcus aureus Growth Rates in Cystic Fibrosis Sputum In chronic lung infections, populations of microbial pathogens change and mature in ways that are often unknown, which makes it challenging to identify appropriate treatment options. A promising tool to better understand the physiology of microorganisms in a patient is stable-isotope probing, which we previously developed to estimate the growth rates of S. aureus in... Cajetan Neubauer, Ajay S. Kasi, Nora Grahl, Alex L. Sessions, Sebastian H. Kopf, Roberta Kato, Deborah A. Hogan, Dianne K. Newman Open Access Research Article Methylation-Induced Hypermutation in Natural Populations of Bacteria A common type of DNA modification, addition of a methyl group to cytosine (C) at carbon atom C-5, can greatly increase the rate of mutation of the C to a T. In mammals, methylation of CG sequences increases the rate of CG→TG mutations. It is unknown whether cytosine C-5 methylation increases the mutation rate in bacteria under natural conditions. I show that sites methylated by the Dcm enzyme exhibit an 8-fold increase in mutation rate... Joshua L. Cherry Research Article | Spotlight Role of Acetyltransferase PG1842 in Gingipain Biogenesis in Porphyromonas gingivalis Gingipain proteases are key virulence factors secreted by Porphyromonas gingivalis that cause periodontal tissue damage and the degradation of the host immune system proteins. Gingipains are translated as an inactive zymogen to restrict intracellular proteolytic activity before secretion. Posttranslational processing converts the inactive proenzyme to a catalytically... Arunima Mishra, Francis Roy, Yuetan Dou, Kangling Zhang, Hui Tang, Hansel M. Fletcher Research Article DNA Methylation by Restriction Modification Systems Affects the Global Transcriptome Profile in Borrelia burgdorferi Lyme disease is the most prevalent vector-borne disease in North America and is classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as an emerging infectious disease with an expanding geographical area of occurrence. Previous studies have shown that the causative bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, methylates its genome using restriction modification... Timothy Casselli, Yvonne Tourand, Adam Scheidegger, William K. Arnold, Anna Proulx, Brian Stevenson, Catherine A. Brissette Open Access Research Article Thermal and Nutritional Regulation of Ribosome Hibernation in Staphylococcus aureus The dimerization of 70S ribosomes (100S complex) plays an important role in translational regulation and infectivity of the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Although the dimerizing factor HPF has been characterized biochemically, the pathways that regulate 100S ribosome abundance remain elusive. We identified a metabolite- and nutrient-sensing transcription... Arnab Basu, Kathryn E. Shields, Christopher S. Eickhoff, Daniel F. Hoft, Mee-Ngan F. Yap Research Article The Manganese-Dependent Pyruvate Kinase PykM Is Required for Wild-Type Glucose Utilization by Brucella abortus 2308 and Its Virulence in C57BL/6 Mice Mn plays a critical role in the physiology and virulence of Brucella strains, and the results presented here suggest that one of the important roles that the high-affinity Mn importer MntH plays in the pathogenesis of these strains is supporting the function of the Mn-dependent kinase PykM. A better understanding of how the brucellae adapt their physiology and... Joshua E. Pitzer, Tonya N. Zeczycki, John E. Baumgartner, Daniel W. Martin, R. Martin Roop Free Research Article Floxed-Cassette Allelic Exchange Mutagenesis Enables Markerless Gene Deletion in Chlamydia trachomatis and Can Reverse Cassette-Induced Polar Effects C. trachomatis infections represent a significant burden to human health. The ability to genetically manipulate Chlamydia spp. is overcoming historic confounding barriers that have impeded rapid progress in understanding overall chlamydial pathogenesis. The current state of genetic manipulation in... G. Keb, R. Hayman, K. A. Fields Research Article The Di-iron RIC Protein (YtfE) of Escherichia coli Interacts with the DNA-Binding Protein from Starved Cells (Dps) To Diminish RIC Protein-Mediated Redox Stress The mammalian immune system produces reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that kill bacterial pathogens by damaging key cellular components, such as lipids, DNA, and proteins. However, bacteria possess detoxifying and repair systems that mitigate these deleterious effects. The Escherichia coli RIC (repair of iron clusters) protein is a di-iron hemerythrin-like protein... Liliana S. O. Silva, Joana M. Baptista, Charlotte Batley, Simon C. Andrews, Lígia M. Saraiva Masthead Free Masthead Editorial Board NEW ASM Journals Now Accepting Submissions in Any Format Current Issue volume 200, issue 24 ​Submit a Manuscript About JB Journal of Bacteriology® (JB) publishes research articles that probe fundamental processes in bacteria, archaea, and their viruses and the molecular mechanisms by which they interact with each other and with their hosts and their environments. For Authors Dr. Thomas J. Silhavy, Editor in Chief Most Read Most Cited
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Biologists turn eavesdropping viruses into bacterial assassins

Biologists turn eavesdropping viruses into bacterial assassins | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
Molecular biologist Bonnie Bassler and graduate student Justin Silpe found a virus that can listen in on bacterial conversations — and then they used that to make it attack diseases including salmonella, E.
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Biofilms feed with swirling flows

Biofilms feed with swirling flows | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
By learning more about the flows generated by a biofilm, researchers may discover new ways to cut off its supply of nutrients.
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How scientists are fighting infection-causing biofilms

Smooth surfaces often provide nooks and crannies for bacteria to hold onto and create a colony. New research with nanoparticles is revealing the secrets of surfaces that prevent bacterial attachment.
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[1810.08887] Modeling Oral Multispecies Biofilm Recovery After Antibacterial Treatment

Download: PDF only (license) Current browse context: q-bio.QM < prev  |  next > new | recent | 1810 Change to browse by: math math.CA q-bio q-bio.PE References & Citations NASA ADS Quantitative Biology > Quantitative Methods Modeling Oral Multispecies Biofilm Recovery After Antibacterial Treatment Xiaobo Jing, Xiangya Huang, Markus Haapasalo, Ya Shen, Qi Wang (Submitted on 21 Oct 2018) Recovery of multispecies oral biofilms is investigated following treatment by chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX), iodine-potassium iodide (IPI) and Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) both experimentally and theoretically. Experimentally, biofilms taken from two donors were exposed to the three antibacterial solutions (irrigants) for 10 minutes, respectively. We observe that (a) live bacterial cell ratios decline for a week after the exposure and the trend reverses beyond a week; after fifteen weeks, live bacterial cell ratios in biofilms fully return to their pretreatment levels; (b) NaOCl is shown as the strongest antibacterial agent for the oral biofilms; (c) multispecies oral biofilms from different donors showed no difference in their susceptibility to all the bacterial solutions. Guided by the experiment, a mathematical model for biofilm dynamics is developed, accounting for multiple bacterial phenotypes, quorum sensing, and growth factor proteins, to describe the nonlinear time evolutionary behavior of the biofilms. The model captures time evolutionary dynamics of biofilms before and after antibacterial treatment very well. It reveals the crucial role played by quorum sensing molecules and growth factors in biofilm recovery and verifies that the source of biofilms has a minimal to their recovery. The model is also applied to describe the state of biofilms of various ages treated by CHX, IPI and NaOCl, taken from different donors. Good agreement with experimental data predicted by the model is obtained as well, confirming its applicability to modeling biofilm dynamics in general. Subjects: Quantitative Methods (q-bio.QM); Classical Analysis and ODEs (math.CA); Populations and Evolution (q-bio.PE) Cite as: arXiv:1810.08887 [q-bio.QM]   (or arXiv:1810.08887v1 [q-bio.QM] for this version) Submission history From: Xiaobo Jing [view email] [v1] Sun, 21 Oct 2018 03:19:29 UTC (1,341 KB) Which authors of this paper are endorsers? | Disable MathJax (What is MathJax?)
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Disrupting communication in infectious bacteria

Disrupting communication in infectious bacteria | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
Chemists report that they have inhibited the biosynthesis of a bacterial signal and, as a result, blocked the infectious properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the most common germ found in health care facilities.
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Evaluation of Biofilm Formation and Frequency of Multidrug-resistant and Extended Drug-resistant Strain in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Bur... - PubMed - NCBI

Evaluation of Biofilm Formation and Frequency of Multidrug-resistant and Extended Drug-resistant Strain in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Bur... - PubMed - NCBI | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it

Adv Biomed Res. 2018 Apr 24;7:61. doi: 10.4103/abr.abr_37_17. eCollection 2018.

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Biofilm-Inspired Fabrication of Complex Nanostructures [Video]

Biofilm-Inspired Fabrication of Complex Nanostructures [Video] | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it

Inspired by biofilm formation, a strategy for templated self-assembly of nano-objects is developed for the fabrication of complex nanostructures.

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Staphylococcus aureus interaction with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm enhances tobramycin resistance

Staphylococcus aureus interaction with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm enhances tobramycin resistance | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
Article
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Bacterial biofilm-based catheter-associated urinary tract infections: Causative pathogens and antibiotic resistance

Bacterial biofilm-based catheter-associated urinary tract infections: Causative pathogens and antibiotic resistance | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
Internal Medicine Article: Bacterial biofilm-based catheter-associated urinary tract infections: Causative pathogens and antibiotic resistance
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Gonorrhea: Possible new treatment uses peptide that interferes with respiratory enzyme - Outbreak News Today

Gonorrhea: Possible new treatment uses peptide that interferes with respiratory enzyme - Outbreak News Today | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
Researchers have identified a possible new treatment for gonorrhea, using a peptide that thwarts the infection-causing bacterium by interfering with an enzyme the microbe needs to respirate. The findings are especially important since Neisseria gonorrhoeae is considered a “superbug” due to its resistance to all classes of antibiotics available for treating infections. Gonorrhea, a sexually …
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Researchers show laser-induced graphene kills bacteria, resists biofouling

Researchers show laser-induced graphene kills bacteria, resists biofouling | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
Scientists at Rice University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) have discovered that laser-induced graphene (LIG) is a highly effective anti-fouling material and, when electrified, bacteria zapper.
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Glycosyltransferase mediated biofilm matrix dynamics and virulence of Streptococcus mutans

Glycosyltransferase mediated biofilm matrix dynamics and virulence of Streptococcus mutans | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
Streptococcus mutans is a key cariogenic bacterium responsible for initiation of tooth decay. Biofilm formation is a crucial virulence property. We discovered a putative glycosyltransferase SMU\_833 in S.
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Bowel Biofilms: Tipping Points between a Healthy and Compromised Gut?

Bacterial communities are known to impact human health and disease. Mixed species
biofilms, mostly pathogenic in nature, have been observed in dental and gastric infections
as well as in intestinal diseases, chronic gut wounds and colon cancer.
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Peeling off slimy biofilms like old stickers

Peeling off slimy biofilms like old stickers | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
Slimy, hard-to-clean bacterial mats called biofilms cause problems ranging from medical infections to clogged drains and fouled industrial equipment. Now, researchers have found a way to cleanly and completely peel off these notorious sludges.
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Biologists turn eavesdropping viruses into bacterial assassins: How cross-kingdom communication led to a breakthrough phage therapy

Biologists turn eavesdropping viruses into bacterial assassins: How cross-kingdom communication led to a breakthrough phage therapy | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
Researchers have found a bacteria-killing virus that can listen in on bacterial conversations -- and then they made it attack diseases including salmonella, E. coli and cholera.
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Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Move Over – Bacillus Subtilis to the Rescue! –

Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Move Over – Bacillus Subtilis to the Rescue! – | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
Antibiotic resistant bacteria is on the rise and that puts lives in danger. Antibiotic resistant bacteria move over – Bacillus subtilis to the rescue!
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Rapid diagnostic assay for detection of cellulose in urine as biomarker for biofilm-related urinary tract infections

Rapid diagnostic assay for detection of cellulose in urine as biomarker for biofilm-related urinary tract infections | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
A rapid test for the presence of bacterial cellulose in urine allows urinary tract infections due to bacteria in the biofilm state to be distinguished from less problematic ‘planktonic’ infections caused by free-living bacteria.
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Microorganisms | Free Full-Text | Role of SCFAs for Fimbrillin-Dependent Biofilm Formation of Actinomyces oris

Microorganisms | Free Full-Text | Role of SCFAs for Fimbrillin-Dependent Biofilm Formation of Actinomyces oris | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
Actinomyces oris expresses type 1 and 2 fimbriae on the cell surface. Type 2 fimbriae mediate co-aggregation and biofilm formation and are composed of the shaft fimbrillin FimA and the tip fimbrillin FimB.
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Biofilm-Inspired Fabrication of Complex Nanostructures [Video]

Biofilm-Inspired Fabrication of Complex Nanostructures [Video] | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it

Inspired by biofilm formation, a strategy for templated self-assembly of nano-objects is developed for the fabrication of complex nanostructures.

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Making intricate images with bacterial communities

Making intricate images with bacterial communities | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it

Working with light and genetically engineered bacteria, researchers are able to shape the growth of bacterial communities. From polka dots to stripes to circuits, they can render intricate designs overnight.

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Microscopy visualisation confirms multi-species biofilms are ubiquitous in diabetic foot ulcers

International Wound Journal
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Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves: Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves: Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is often very difficult, in part because they are extremely water-repellent. Scientists have now been able to show how such biofilms adapt their surface texture to repel water -- similar to leaves.
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Biofilm microenvironment induces a widespread adaptive amino-acid fermentation pathway conferring strong fitness advantage in Escherichia coli

Biofilm microenvironment induces a widespread adaptive amino-acid fermentation pathway conferring strong fitness advantage in Escherichia coli | Quorum sensing | Scoop.it
Author summary Whereas Escherichia coli does not naturally produce the 1-propanol unless subjected to extensive genetic modifications, we show that this important industrial commodity is produced in hypoxic conditions inside biofilms. 1-propanol production corresponds to a native threonine fermentation pathway previously undocumented in E. coli and other Enterobacteriaceae. This widespread adaptive response contributes to maintain cellular redox balance and bacterial fitness in biofilms and other amino acid-rich hypoxic environments. This study therefore shows that mining complex lifestyles such as biofilm microenvironments provides new insight into the extent of bacterial metabolic potential and adaptive bacterial physiological responses.
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