Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
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Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
Social marketing, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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Scooped by Jeff Domansky
March 22, 2016 11:25 AM
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Pew: Facebook and Twitter Becoming Influential Sources of News

Pew: Facebook and Twitter Becoming Influential Sources of News | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

Facebook and Twitter are increasingly becoming news sources for its users, but news is not necessarily the reason why people are logging onto these social networking sites. It just so happens that news ends up being part of the social media experience.


That’s according to a new report from the Pew Research Center.


"One of the things we saw early on is the degree to which people describe this as 'incidental news...And that's something that's being reinforced." -- Amy Mitchell, director of journalism research for the Pew Research Center


The findings cement the fact that both users and news organizations must continue to wrestle with social media, its different features and their implications.


“Social media is certainly a part of Americans’ news streams, and it’s going to continue to be a part of that,” said Amy Mitchell, director of journalism research for the Pew Research Center.


“And the different ways people connect with these platforms will influence how they learn about their communities and the world.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

This just in... ;-)

jasmine moriah gabrielle hummel's curator insight, March 22, 2016 11:42 AM

This just in... ;-)

Mike Allen's curator insight, March 26, 2016 4:46 AM

This just in... ;-)

jasmine moriah gabrielle hummel's curator insight, April 6, 2016 7:36 PM
Does this mean Facebook and Twitter know everything in the world?
Scooped by Jeff Domansky
August 29, 2013 9:48 AM
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The decline of Big Media, 1980s-2000s: Key history lessons and a brief survey of trends

The decline of Big Media, 1980s-2000s: Key history lessons and a brief survey of trends | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

2013 essay excerpted from BU professor Chris Daly's book...


The word “crisis” often comes up when talking about journalism in the U.S. and throughout the world: Dropping ad revenue, falling circulation, failed efforts to retool old models to fit a changing media landscape. As the blogosphere and Twitter rise, more opinionated kinds of media coverage push back against the longstanding ideals of impartiality and objectivity, and even the once sacrosanct authority of mainstream journalism is called into question.


But as many journalists, authors and researchers have noted, U.S. journalism has been in transition since its birth, from early broadsides of the revolutionary era through the disruptive entries of radio, television and now the Internet. In his 2012 book, Covering America: A Narrative History of a Nation’s Journalism, author and Boston University journalism professor Christopher B. Daly places the current state of journalism within its recent historical context. Below is an essay based on the book....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

If you're fascinated by media and journalism like to reflect on the disruption taking place in social media, this is recommended reading.

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Scooped by Jeff Domansky
August 21, 2013 12:58 AM
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Online Video Pioneer: News Sites Will Bring Video Out from Pay Walls | Mediashift | PBS

Online Video Pioneer: News Sites Will Bring Video Out from Pay Walls | Mediashift | PBS | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

As an early adopter of convergence, award-winning journalist Sam Meddis made the leap to the web as USA Today's online technology editor in the '90s....


IJNet: What are the differences in storytelling techniques between print and visual media?

SM: In a text story you still want to describe things visually, but I think what you’re doing with a video story is concentrating more on what people will see and not describing it. You don’t have to describe what people are going to see — I think that’s a big mistake. It’s a different way of describing the visual element, but it is important if you’re writing a script that you’re not repeating what people are seeing.Print reporters are really good storytellers, and the storytelling is the thing that’s important. The technology — like how to use a videocamera and microphone — those things can be taught pretty quickly and easily. It’s really: Are you a good storyteller....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

This is a very good read on storytelling, journalism, and technology trends in the newsroom.

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Rescooped by Jeff Domansky from Content curation trends
October 3, 2013 4:16 PM
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Building a successful media on content curation? Ooops! Someone did it again. Well done Upworthy!

Building a successful media on content curation? Ooops! Someone did it again. Well done Upworthy! | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

What if BuzzFeed had a political agenda? Upworthy does, and it's doing well.


Via Guillaume Decugis
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Some think aggregation is aggravation and dying. Upworthy is showing otherwise.

Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, September 18, 2013 4:04 AM

While Peter Kafka's use of the word clickbait in his original title might sound derogatory, his article explains quite well how valuable Upworthy's use of great content curation has become attracting more than 22 million monthly visitors.


After the Huffington Post, after Business Insider, oops! Someone did it again then, relying primarily on curation rather than creation to create a successful media.


What's worth noting this time is that unlike BI or the HuffPost, Upworthy has no plan to create some of its content. A bold strategy that fits well with the line of the site.

Alejandro Tortolini's curator insight, September 28, 2013 11:51 AM

Ejemplo de curaduría aplicada a los medios.

Scooped by Jeff Domansky
August 29, 2013 9:33 AM
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Making News More LIke "Grand Theft Auto"

Making News More LIke "Grand Theft Auto" | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

As tech watchers debate the overuse of interactive tools in stories David Sarno says light interactive news stories don't go far enough. As a tech reporter at the Los Angeles Times David Sarno found himself frustrated that newspaper stories only engage “one lousy sense,” as he puts it. That would be sight.


Why couldn’t they be as interactive and entertaining as a video game like Grand Theft Auto, where a player can walk around a virtual city, drive a car, walk into a store (and, yes, kill people), and essentially have some control over a re-created reality?


Even when the iPad came out in 2010 (an event that Sarno prolifically covered for The Times) and made print media more touchable, Sarno wasn’t impressed. “At that time, and still largely today, what news organizations and magazines are doing is reproducing the print version on the screen,” he tells Fast Company. “It’s like two steps better than scanning in the print version and putting it on the iPad screen.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

David Samo asks some provocative questions about journalism in this stimulating post and look at the future for 3-D storytelling and reporting.

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