Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
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Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
Social marketing, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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February 15, 2017 3:11 AM
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Politics Gave Nordstrom a 11,000% Increase on Social Media

Politics Gave Nordstrom a 11,000% Increase on Social Media | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

Let’s dive into one of the more recent mentions. In our first graph, Nordstrom sees the highest engagement spike for their February mention by Trump. So how is the current controversy playing out for the brand on social media? 

 

Over 3.45 Million Engagements

From February 6th to 13th, 2017, Nordstrom has driven over 3.45 million engagements across Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest on English language content. Compare this with a weekly average of 31,000 engagements in January 2017. This most recent week is over a 11,000 percent increase to that average.

 

Let’s look at some of the top stories and how they performed. Analyzing top stories platform-by-platform can yield different results, especially concerning stories about companies. Those on Facebook tend to be more emotive, while LinkedIn’s top stories tend to focus on the implications for the brand’s business....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

What can brands and publishers expect from a political mention? NewsWhip dives into the latest controversy, around Nordstrom and how it played out on social media.

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October 12, 2016 10:45 AM
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Five Essential Reputation Management Tools

Five Essential Reputation Management Tools | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

IAn instant is all it takes to threaten your business's sterling reputation online. You might have had an off day or the misfortune of dealing with an ornery customer, but it's almost inevitable that you'll come face to face with a negative online review at some point in your career.

 

But, as Adrienne Weissman, CMO at G2 Crowd, recently pointed out, negative reviews aren't all bad. Some 70% of Americans read reviews before making a purchase, and those who seek out negative reviews tend to be more engaged and are 67% more likely to make a purchase. Plus, 68% of people trust a company more when their reviews are a mix of good and bad.

 

Of course, the key to making the best of a bad review lies largely in your response. That means you need to be able to find reviews (both good and bad) as they pop up. That's definitely more social media monitoring than one person can handle...

 

And that's where reputation management tools come in. The following five reputation management tools are some of the best on the market for tracking mentions, discovering influencers, and managing online reviews as they happen....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Good reputation management tools if you have a budget, though several offer freemium versions

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September 5, 2016 10:16 AM
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What 100,000 Tweets About the Volkswagen Scandal Tell Us About Angry Customers | Harvard Business Review 

What 100,000 Tweets About the Volkswagen Scandal Tell Us About Angry Customers | Harvard Business Review  | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

In September 2015 the Environmental Protection Agency found that many Volkswagen cars sold in the United States were equipped with software that could falsely improve the performance of diesel engines on emissions tests. This cheating was subsequently acknowledged by the car maker.Among the many issues at stake for the company was one of public perception.


Anecdotal evidencate at the time of the incident suggested irreparable harm to the Volkswagen brand. So could Volkswagen recover in the short term in this regard? And, the broader question, how can you measure brand perception in times of scandal, particularly in an era where social media can cause negative news to proliferate and reverberate over time?


In the absence of direct empirical evidence, we wanted to find a way to tackle this important issue. We began our research with some key questions: How does social media sentiment change as a consequence of a public relations crisis? How does the public react to recovery efforts initiated by the company? How do topics of conversation shift as a consequence of a brand scandal and subsequent recovery efforts?...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Lessons for crisis communicators from Harvard Business Review.

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January 15, 2016 1:03 AM
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Quiz: What to Do When Bad PR Happens to Famous People

Quiz: What to Do When Bad PR Happens to Famous People | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

Every publicist feels a combination of schadenfreude and cold-sweat relief upon reading about a crisis involving someone else’s client. And is it me, or does it seem that entertainment publicists have an extra helping of these opportunities? Whether it’s due to naughty personal behavior or corporate shenanigans, we all get our chance at crisis management at some point. This little multiple-choice quiz based on hypothetical scenarios (some of which may or may not bear a resemblance to real-life episodes) can help us all keep our skills sharp. 

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Take this crisis PR quiz and see how you do in some real to life situations.

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February 6, 2015 2:51 AM
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Should You Tweet During A Crisis? 5 Things To Consider

Should You Tweet During A Crisis? 5 Things To Consider | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

Whether it is fair or not, when your business is tweeting during a major negative news event, offense can come quickly.It’s important for social media managers to have a pulse on these events, and a plan in place to pause your scheduled content so at not to seem “out of touch” or insensitive to your audience when earth rattling news occurs.


Here are five considerations to make when a story breaks...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Casie Shimansky shares 5 valuable tips on tweeting during a crisis. Recommended reading for crisis managers.

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August 15, 2014 8:45 PM
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Ferguson Police Tactics Equal PR Fail

Ferguson Police Tactics Equal PR Fail | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it
Like so many of you, I have been stunned by the images of a militarized police force in Ferguson, MO harassing, tear gassing, arresting and even beating citizens who are protesting the police shoot...


...Let me be clear – these police actions are absolutely wrong from a human perspective too. And, from what I have seen, they have trampled on the people’s right to assemble, freedom of the press, free speech, destruction of personal property, unlawful arrests and likely dozens of other rights I’m not even familiar with.


But, strictly from a PR perspective, they are cutting of their own noses to spite there faces....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

An epic PR and policing failure. Contrast Ferguson police actions with Missouri State Police efforts to reach out, communicate and deescalate the crisis.

wanderingsalsero's comment, August 15, 2014 11:05 PM
I agree totally Jeff. I've posted lot of stuff about it too. But this is just the result of a trend that some people (AKA: 'kooks', conspiracy theorists, etc.) have been trying to call attention to for years. This is not the same America we were born into and I'm afraid it's going to be very, very traumatic (at best) to turn it around.
Jeff Domansky's comment, August 15, 2014 11:45 PM
WanderingsAlero thanks for comments. Truly a tragedy made worse by poor police response.
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September 26, 2013 11:11 AM
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How Your Online Reputation Affects Your Startup's Bottom Line

How Your Online Reputation Affects Your Startup's Bottom Line | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

Your reputation is just as important today as it was in high school.


Except a hit to your brand's reputation today will do more than hurt your social standing--it will hurt your bottom line.


During the next five years, 83 percent of companies will face a crisis that will negatively affect their share price, an infographic from Digital Firefly says.


You don't want to be part of the 83 percent.But a crisis isn't the only time you should monitor your brand's online reputation. Potential customers may sidestep your products based on other things they see online, like product reviews or ads....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

In the next five years, 83 percent of companies will face a crisis that could negatively affect their value. Here's how to ensure that won't happen...

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September 5, 2013 2:01 AM
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Facebook Use By Organizations During Crises Helps Public Image, MU Study Finds: PR Pros Can Improve Public Attitudes by Communicating Through Facebook During Times of Crisis

Facebook Use By Organizations During Crises Helps Public Image, MU Study Finds: PR Pros Can Improve Public Attitudes by Communicating Through Facebook During Times of Crisis | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

“Many studies have already shown how important crisis management is for organizations,” Hong said. “This study shows that Facebook can be a valuable tool for public relations professionals when working to solve or lessen the severity of a crisis. Because Facebook is very personal for its users, well-thought-out crisis management messages can be effective at reaching users on a personal level, which is a powerful way to persuade people to a cause.”


Hong also found that Facebook posts written in a narrative style were more effective than posts written in a non-narrative format. Narrative style is chronological and focuses more on story-telling rather than fact listing.


“This indicates that the effect of narrative tone in organizational statements during crises increases perceived conversational human voice, which represents a high level of engagement and best communicates trust, satisfaction, and commitment to the audience,” Hong said. “This is an important practice for public relations professionals because perceptions that an organization is sincerely trying to provide timely and accurate information during a crisis can lead to not only more favorable attitudes toward the organization, but also perceptions of less responsibility the organization has for causing the crisis.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Research says on Facebook during a crisis, it should be all about narrative in order to build a positive image...

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July 16, 2013 11:33 PM
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This CEO is a Train Wreck: 9 Crisis Communication Lessons You Can Learn | Braud Communications

This CEO is a Train Wreck: 9 Crisis Communication Lessons You Can Learn | Braud Communications | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

...Edward Burkhardt, CEO of Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Railways waited 5 days before visiting the crash site andmaking a statement to the media. His statement lacks a significant, quotable apology to those affected, while focusing too much on the technical aspects of dealing with insurance, finances and monetary issues. He even begins his statement by defending whether he is a compassionate person.


True, the CEO does not always need to be the spokesperson in every crisis. However, a crisis this big demands an appearance and statement within 24 hours of the onset of the crisis.


True, I believe a CEO should spend more time managing the crisis and running the company than trying to be a spokesperson, but a crisis this big demands at least a few hours to talk with the media and the families who have lost loved ones. News reports indicate that at the time of the news briefing, the CEO had not reached out to families....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Train company CEO's crisis management called a "train wreck" by crisis experts.

Jeff Domansky's comment, March 6, 2014 5:11 PM
Meredith Nichole in my opinion, this was so serious only the CEO should comment. If he was deemed unable or not empathetic enough, then next most senior should speak. They had no strategy for the tragedy.
Traci Bartgis's comment, March 6, 2014 6:48 PM
I think it is embaressing that it took the CEO 5 days to respond to such a tragedy. Hopefully he can read this article and be more prepared if something like this happens again.
Katie Daugherty's comment, March 7, 2014 3:37 PM
I like that this outlined exact things to do. A lot of articles just give general ideas, but this one told you actual restrictions. Waiting until the 5th day to respond to a crisis obviously isn't a smart thing to do, but having a statement within an hour is a good requirement. I think in a crisis situation, it's best to make sure the public knows you are reacting, whether there is a fully detailed plan or not.
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June 28, 2013 9:36 PM
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Fri PR & SM Picks: Crisis, content, communication

Fri PR & SM Picks: Crisis, content, communication | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

Happy, Friday. This week's Friday PR Picks and social media missives are loaded with crisis management, content marketing and communication insight. 


We're featuring 9 valuable crisis management, 10 public relations posts and 14 must-read social media articles. Perfect for the long weekend.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Our Friday PR & social media picks are all dressed up and ready to go. Enjoy them!

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June 17, 2013 11:47 PM
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HGTV's Floundering Crisis Response for Flag Folly | Crisis Management

HGTV's Floundering Crisis Response for Flag Folly | Crisis Management | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

We never seem to run dry examples of easily preventable crises. Last week, an article on Home and Garden TV’s website discussing Fourth of July table settings suggested that an American flag be used as a “bright and festive table runner.” Whoops…


As you probably guessed, flocks of military vets and their families, along citizens from just about every walk of life, descended on HGTV’s social media sites to rip the network a new one for its misuse of the flag.


To HGTV’s credit, it quickly deleted the article and posted an apology, but to its detriment the apology was a weak one....


Jeff Domansky's insight:

Easily avoided and hampered by a lukewarm apology.

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June 3, 2013 8:15 PM
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The Use of Hashtags in Your Crisis Communications - By Melissa Agnes

The Use of Hashtags in Your Crisis Communications - By Melissa Agnes | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it
Twitter plays an essential role within your crisis management. The use of a crisis hashtag is one of the most important parts of your crisis communications.

 

One of my favorite crisis bloggers, Kim Stephens, recently published an interesting summary of two reports by Project Hazards Emergency Response and Online Informal Communication (HEROIC), on their research around the use of Twitter by officials in the Boston Marathon Bombings. There are many aspects of these reports that are very interesting, but the thing that struck me the most was the inconsistency of hashtag use, across the board, during the week of events that followed the Marathon Bombings....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Absolutely essential crisis strategy and potential weakness in the throes of the Boston Marathon crisis. Recommended reading for crisis managers everywhere!

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May 8, 2013 10:11 AM
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Mountain Dew, Courting Too Much Controversy | Contently

Mountain Dew, Courting Too Much Controversy | Contently | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

Mountain Dew might have thought twice about the risk and reward from a deal with someone just as focused on branding as it is.

 

...The company even earned some good press for buying a promoted tweet to publicize its mea culpa. And the top of its website leads with a giant “We Apologize” note. Following these comments, PepsiCo hasn’t put an executive on a public chopping block, and Tyler has declared they loved the idea when it pitched it. Which begs the question of how sincere this apology is. Audiences will probably trust artists more than brands, so PepsiCo cutting their losses must also include a loss of credibility with Tyler’s base....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Great publicity for Tyler, terrible PR fail for Mountain Dew. More on the initial story and my early predictions of a PR fail and reputation hit in my post "Mountain Dew’s Marketing Muckup, Painful PR" at http://bit.ly/10VUFxu 

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November 2, 2016 6:17 PM
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Role of Social Media in Local Government Crisis Communications | Institute for Public Relations

Role of Social Media in Local Government Crisis Communications | Institute for Public Relations | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

Despite the enormous value social media yield governments in communicating with citizens, there is scant research on the extent to which local governments are actually using social media for crisis communication efforts.  As local governments continue to face diminishing budgets stretched time, and human, and fiscal resources even for the management of daily operations, it is imperative to reveal how social media can maximize efficiency in crisis management.  In addition, given the extraordinary growth in social media use over the past few years, it is also important to evaluate if and how governments are using this technology to communicate with publics during crisis and incorporating it into their crisis communication plans.

Using survey data collected from more than 300 local government officials from municipalities across the United States, this study examined social media use in a relatively unexplored context, local governments. It specifically addressed the adoption and use of social media tools for crisis communication and social media’s part in managing a crisis.  Results indicate the extent of social media use, but not the number of tools used, is positively associated with local city officials’ assessments of their ability to control a crisis situation as well as their overall evaluations of the strength of their responses.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Interesting study on how to resource crisis communications and social media in local government.

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October 8, 2016 11:07 AM
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How not to apologize, by Donald Trump - without bullshit

How not to apologize, by Donald Trump - without bullshit | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

Donald Trump made piggish comments about women to Billy Bush, the cohost of Access Hollywood, in 2005. NBC released the video yesterday.

 

The video makes clear that, at least in 2005, Trump considered bedding women as sort of a video game, one he plays to win with wealth and power. As Republicans began to distance themselves from the comments — and some from Trump — Trump apologized. His apology is a case study in how not to apologize.

 

Here are some qualities of sincere apologies.

- You take responsibility for what you did.

- You are specific.

- You don’t talk about how you got caught and whether that is fair.

- You apologize directly to the people you hurt

.- You find or offer ways to make amends.

- You don’t justify why what you did is ok.

- You don’t go off topic to avoid talking about what happened.

 

Trump’s apology fails on every single element....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

PR fail of the highest order. This guy's going down!

Celebrity Scoop's comment, October 9, 2016 1:32 AM
you don't justify
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March 7, 2016 3:23 AM
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PR Disaster: Lessons to Learn and Expert Advice

PR Disaster: Lessons to Learn and Expert Advice | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

One of the trickiest challenges you will ever face when launching and growing your business is doing your public relations right. In its most generic terms, public relations involves activities that promote a positive image and foster goodwill in order to increase sales while conveying the right message.


 


Reputation is everything for a brand and PR campaigns play important role in improving the brand value. Other advantages include:Improve engagement and image building.


 


Reaching new target markets sounds great, doesn’t it? But one wrong step and you are likely to lose it all....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Cause and consequences of PR disasters and examples of worst PR disasters as well as expert tips and advice on crisis management.

Godigitalcoup Tungsten's curator insight, March 7, 2016 5:46 AM
Cause and consequences of PR disasters and examples of worst PR disasters as well as expert tips and advice on crisis management.
Stéphane Koch's curator insight, March 8, 2016 4:15 PM

Cause and consequences of PR disasters and examples of worst PR disasters as well as expert tips and advice on crisis management.

WikiBlinks's curator insight, March 9, 2016 2:52 AM

Cause and consequences of PR disasters and examples of worst PR disasters as well as expert tips and advice on crisis management.

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April 23, 2015 2:30 AM
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Online Reputation Management Best Practices

Online Reputation Management Best Practices | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

What do you do when your business has a poor reputation online or received a poor review?A lot of businesses and individuals often wonder how they can better their online reputation.


First, let me tell you how NOT to address negativity online. Don’t create fake reviews.  Fake reviews, especially the kind that are paid for, are easily identified by your potential consumers and that will break their trust in you. In addition to being caught by potential consumers, you will likely be caught by site owners and/or Google. For sites like Yelp, they have publicly shamed businesses that they have caught....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Here are some valuable tips on managing your online reputation and what to do about negative information online.

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September 15, 2014 8:40 PM
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Urban Outfitters Just Hit a New Low by Selling Bloody Kent State Sweatshirt

Urban Outfitters Just Hit a New Low by Selling Bloody Kent State Sweatshirt | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

Filed under: The most WTF thing we've seen in months.


Urban Outfitters, purveyor of clothing and home goods, big-ass floppy hats and occasionally offensive T-shirts, has outdone itself with this product on its website—a "vintage" Kent State University sweatshirt featuring fake blood splatters.


In 1970, the Ohio National Guard fired on a group of unarmed anti-war student protesters at Kent State, killing four and wounding nine others.

The sweatshirt sold out quickly, because there was only one. ("We only have one, so get it or regret it!" said the description.) Now it's listed on eBay by someone who says he/she will "give 50% of the profit to the Southern Poverty Law Center, who protect those who cannot protect themselves, often those who are victims of police brutality."...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

While not intentended, it's still a marketing fail. Someone in the marketing department needs sensitivity training or some idea of how sloppy thinking can create a mini crisis that can quickly escalate into a social media firestorm. To their credit, the company was quick to apologize and explain but it shouldn't have gone there in the first place. Another marketing lesson.

Deanna Casey's curator insight, September 15, 2014 9:54 PM

Urban Outfitters clothing and home goods store has many loyal customers purchasing their unique items and childish style. Although their style and products are well liked among young hipsters, they have always been known for their controversial saying on products. Many people take offense to their blunt choices of prints and designs that contain controversial messages. Recently, in this article by adweek.com, they posted a vintage faded Kent State University sweatshirt with dye blood splatters, or what seemed to be. The company only had one for sale and did not refer to the 1970 anti-war student protesters killed and wounded at the University. Social media took off on this negative advertised product from a company that is constantly looking to be a topic of discussion. Teen Twitter members were furious that the company they purchased from were insensitive to the tragic event in 1970. Urban Outfitters posted an apology that the stains on the shirt were in no way supposed to represent a blood stain or had any connection to the 1970’s shooting event at Kent State University. Social consumers are gathering this negative information about Urban and seeing the hate from many on social media sites, this would lead them to purchase from a competing brand. Urban Outfitters digital identity of the way they represent themselves has been becoming more negative in the past couple years. With their countless articles of clothing with drinking and drugs messages, and their customer base under the age of 21 their reviews on social media have been nothing but negative. I feel that Urban Outfitters wants any sort of media coverage, good or bad. Having the spotlight on them encourages consumers to search the site, and possibly like some of their products. Urban has a fan base of mainly hipsters, which are identified as stepping out of the box and doing things outside the lines, the company is doing the same just in more extreme cases.

Amanda Wall's curator insight, September 19, 2014 6:56 PM

Recently in class we were assigned a project where we could choose a for profit on non-profit organization I chose Urban Outfitters, one of the most recent controversial clothing companies in today society.

 

This article describes how Urban Outfitters is defending there vintage Kent State sweater, however, most people see through the vintage look and see it as nothing more than the tragedy that occurred in 1970. The Ohio National Guard fired on a group of unarmed anti-war student protestors at Kent State, resulting in four deaths and nine wounded. As to be expected people who know the background behind Kent State automatically assume the red "vintage" stains on the sweater is blood stains, whether the stains represents blood or not this specific sweater has respectfully been pulled off the shelves. 

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May 5, 2014 2:26 PM
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A Key Player in a Scandal, V. Stiviano Feeds the Media’s Appetite

A Key Player in a Scandal, V. Stiviano Feeds the Media’s Appetite | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it
If you wanted to see clearly into how all the various components of the modern media ecosystem interact, you could not come up with a better real-time experiment than the Donald Sterling story.
Jeff Domansky's insight:

This is a gladiator's battle with a full house watching in the internet coliseum.

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September 10, 2013 11:25 AM
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What we learned from Taco Bell taco licking fiasco about handling bad social media publicity - Mc2 Social Media

What we learned from Taco Bell taco licking fiasco about handling bad social media publicity - Mc2 Social Media | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

One of the smartest things a brand can do is to respond as quickly and intelligently as possible to negative social media publicity, which is exactly what Taco Bell did.


Whether it’s an unsatisfactory customer experience, a management mistake, product malfunction or an employee of a major fast food chain publicly posting photos of themselves licking Tacos there are many reasons a company can get bad publicity.Below, we share with you some simple PR techniques that may well be worth thinking about so that your company is ready when people start talking about you on a blog, Facebook or Twitter....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Good social media crisis PR lessons....

Hendy Han's curator insight, September 26, 2013 4:19 AM

This is a great article that includes a great example from previous case from Taco Bell. Publicity fame can be a double edge sword, where company is vulnerable for negative comments. This article provide a lot of great PR techniques that a company could take advantage of. Once a company goes online, they have to understand that a negative publicity can bring down a company so fast. It is important to handle the situation in timely fashion and keep responding in a good way to the customers. When a company goes through social media, it is important not to just leave it as it be. It has to be tracked on how the audiences and customers think about the company. Here, the PR department plays a big role to maintain the company image. A good thing suggested in the company, is to always consider a compesation from a critical mistake that they have done.

 

Levi Norton's comment, September 26, 2013 7:42 PM
In response to Hendy, I fully agree that if a company is in a publicity fame companies need to be prepared to respond to dissatisfied customers and reply to them as soon as possible if not the company could pay huge consequences . Great Read
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August 1, 2013 12:04 PM
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Lessons Learned from the Boston Bombings - Crisis Insights Blog

Lessons Learned from the Boston Bombings - Crisis Insights Blog | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

The bombings at the Boston marathon were a tragic reminder that terrorism can strike anywhere at any time. Business Continuity professionals should be thinking about the effects of a terrorist attack and incorporate those scenarios into their plans.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Smart crisis management tips and lessons.

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July 7, 2013 7:23 PM
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Asiana Airlines: An Unsympathetic Press Release | Mr. Media Training

Asiana Airlines: An Unsympathetic Press Release | Mr. Media Training | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it
After one of its planes crash landed into San Francisco, Asiana Airlines issued a press release that didn't even acknowledge the victims.
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Unintended PR fail I'm sure as their Twitter feed expressed sympathy appropriately. A subsequent statement got it better but another crisis PR lesson for all.

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June 23, 2013 7:30 PM
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Calgary Police Get Twitter Jail During Flood Crisis | The PR Coach

Calgary Police Get Twitter Jail During Flood Crisis | The PR Coach | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

So far, during an overwhelming flood disaster, Calgary emergency personnel and police have performed incredibly well.


Twitter? Absolutely not!


As flooding surprised the city last Thursday, Calgary Police put its crisis management plan into action. Part of the plan included using its official Twitter account @CalgaryPolice. Providing updates, critical crisis information and engaging with residents wherever possible.


That is, until Twitter shut down the account for exceeding the daily 1,000-post limit....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

The challenges of social media in a crisis were increased when Calgary Police were put in "Twitter jail" for exceeding tweet limits.

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June 17, 2013 11:42 PM
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How to Use Social Media to Manage a Crisis | Chris Syme

How to Use Social Media to Manage a Crisis | Chris Syme | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

If you’ve been using social media strategies to create loyal followers, you’ll have a decisive advantage when a crisis hits. Companies that have an advanced social media strategies in place will mitigate a negative event quicker and with less financial loss. Here, we are going to take a look at three areas that will help you manage a crisis with social media: tools, tactics, and tips....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Extensive and valuabl;e crisis management tips, tools and tactics from Chris Syme.

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May 24, 2013 9:59 AM
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Teen Activist Meets With Abercrombie Executives, But CEO Jeffries Is A No-Show

Teen Activist Meets With Abercrombie Executives, But CEO Jeffries Is A No-Show | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

Abercrombie & Fitch’s two-hour meeting this week with critics of its no-large-sizes strategy, and of CEO Mike Jeffries’ 2006 remarks that it only courts “attractive, cool” kids, prompted a mea culpa from the chain, and a vow to “take concrete steps to demonstrate our commitment to anti-bullying in addition to our ongoing support of diversity and inclusion,” the teen retailer said in a statement.


During the meeting, 18-year old activist Benjamin O’Keefe — whose Change.org petition urged A&F to carry larger sizes – Lyne Grefe, the CEO of the National Eating Disorder Association, among others, urged Abercrombie executives to add bigger clothes to store shelves, feature larger models in their branding efforts, cease hawking hyper sexualized advertising to its teen audience and redefine its warped, harmful notions of cool, O’Keefe told Forbes.com. Although the CEO was not at the meeting, the retailer offered a tacit apology for Jeffries’ remarks seven years ago, which included this gem: “A lot of people don’t belong [in our clothes] and they can’t belong. Are we exclusionary? Absolutely.”...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

A&F reputation hit continues long after when a heartfelt apology at the outset could have prevented much criticism.

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