Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
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Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
Social marketing, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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Scooped by Jeff Domansky
April 11, 2017 11:00 AM
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New, More Rigorous Study Confirms: The More You Use Facebook, the Worse You Feel

New, More Rigorous Study Confirms: The More You Use Facebook, the Worse You Feel | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

Overall, our results showed that, while real-world social networks were positively associated with overall well-being, the use of Facebook was negatively associated with overall well-being. These results were particularly strong for mental health; most measures of Facebook use in one year predicted a decrease in mental health in a later year. We found consistently that both liking others’ content and clicking links significantly predicted a subsequent reduction in self-reported physical health, mental health, and life satisfaction.


Our models included measures of real-world networks and adjusted for baseline Facebook use. When we accounted for a person’s level of initial well-being, initial real-world networks, and initial level of Facebook use, increased use of Facebook was still associated with a likelihood of diminished future well-being. This provides some evidence that the association between Facebook use and compromised well-being is a dynamic process.


Although we can show that Facebook use seems to lead to diminished well-being, we cannot definitively say how that occurs. We did not see much difference between the three types of activity we measured — liking, posting, and clicking links, (although liking and clicking were more consistently significant) — and the impact on the user. This was interesting, because while we expected that “liking” other people’s content would be more likely to lead to negative self-comparisons and thus decreases in well-being, updating one’s own status and clicking links seemed to have a similar effect (although the nature of status updates can ostensibly be the result of social comparison-tailoring your own Facebook image based on how others will perceive it). Overall our results suggests that well-being declines are also matter of quantity of use rather than only quality of use. If this is the case, our results contrast with previous research arguing that the quantity of social media interaction is irrelevant, and that only the quality of those interactions matter....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Online social interactions are no substitute for the real thing.

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Scooped by Jeff Domansky
January 29, 2016 12:14 AM
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90% of Facebook's daily active users access it via mobile

90% of Facebook's daily active users access it via mobile | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

Facebook just released financial results for Q4 of 2015, and one number starts out in particular: 934 million mobile daily active users (DAUs).

Sure, 0.9 billion might not sound quite as impressive as the 1.04 billion total daily users, but we already knew the company had passed the billion milestone in early November.

There were 894 million mobile DAUs at the time, which means the company has added 40 million more mobile users per day since November, and it will very likely cross 1 billion mobile DAUs sometime this year.

Meanwhile, the company is also slowly encroaching on the 2 billion monthly active users (MAUs) mark – three were 1.59 billion MAUs in December, or 14 percent more than the same time in 2014. Of those, 1.44 came from mobile, an increase of 21 percent, once again showing the quicker growth in the mobile sector....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Love it or hate it, Facebook is a social media and marketing juggernaut and 90% of users access it by mobile.

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Scooped by Jeff Domansky
July 27, 2016 9:09 AM
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Do Men Use Facebook Differently Than Women?

Do Men Use Facebook Differently Than Women? | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

Facebook is all about connecting with others. Your connections are called “friends” whether you actually know them in real life or not. Men and women both friend others on the network, but they’re very different in how they do it.


Social media has become ubiquitous. It seems like everyone has a Facebook or Twitter account these days. It’s actually more common to hear some say, “Message me on Facebook,” than it is to hear them say, “call me” or “email me”. Social networks have become our online homes where we interact and communicate with friends and family, as well as with businesses that we patronize.


It’s a social world out there, but there are some striking differences between how different people use those social networks, particularly when comparing the different ways that men and women use Facebook...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Vive la difference but use it to your advantage in content marketing.

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Scooped by Jeff Domansky
May 24, 2015 11:58 PM
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Facebook Analysis For April - Videos Dominate Engagement

Facebook Analysis For April - Videos Dominate Engagement | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

As a follow up to our Facebook reach study in March, we looked at the numbers for April. To say that video dominated is an understatement.

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Very interesting Facebook research for marketers.

Carol Bently's curator insight, May 25, 2015 2:36 AM

engagement of what?