Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
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Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
Social marketing, PR insight & thought leadership - from The PR Coach
Curated by Jeff Domansky
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Scooped by Jeff Domansky
October 27, 2014 1:07 AM
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"Secret" Media Training School for Republicans | Mr Media Training

"Secret" Media Training School for Republicans | Mr Media Training | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

CNN.com recently ran a fascinating piece about the “GOP’s secret school,” in which candidates learn how to interact with the media. The school is a reaction to the high-profile crises the GOP has inflicted upon itself in recent years—from Todd Akin’s “legitimate rape” comment to Christine O’Donnell’s “I am not a witch” ad—and party officials are determined not to repeat past mistakes.


According to the article:“Since the beginning of 2014, the RNC says it has graduated over 200 operatives and placed many of them as communications directors and press secretaries in Capitol Hill offices and federal campaigns nationwide…[Instructor] Rob Lockwood has also conducted media training boot camps with nearly 1,000 candidates, staff and local political figures in a dozen states.


”It appears that this GOP training class is doing everything right in its effort to improve external communications. There’s good advice here for everyone involved in politics, regardless of party or cause. In this post, I’ll highlight the excerpts that caught my attention most....

Jeff Domansky's insight:

In an effort to prevent some of the high-profile disasters that doomed many of their candidates, the Republican National Committee started a "secret" media training class.

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Scooped by Jeff Domansky
January 24, 2014 9:46 AM
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What Is Your Big, Shiny Object? | Mr. Media Training

What Is Your Big, Shiny Object? | Mr. Media Training | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

I often ask my clients a deceptively simple question: What is your big, shiny object? Until they can answer that clearly, they're not ready to present.


If you tell an audience everything, you’ve told them nothing. People can only take in so much information in any given amount of time, and loading them with too many new facts can prevent them from absorbing your most important one. That’s obvious, I know, but many speakers—even some of the smartest, most thoughtful people I know—try to put too much content into their presentations.


As a result, the main point they really want to shine through gets obscured by an overabundance of rhetorical clutter. So I often ask my clients a deceptively simple question: What is your big, shiny object?

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Less is more. Superb speaking and interview training advice from Brad Phillips, AKA Mr Media Training.

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Scooped by Jeff Domansky
October 14, 2014 9:34 AM
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Can You Say "I'm Not Here To Talk About That Topic?" | Mr Media Training

Can You Say "I'm Not Here To Talk About That Topic?" | Mr Media Training | Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight | Scoop.it

If reporters break their promise to you and ask about a topic they promised they wouldn't, can you say "I'm not here to talk about that topic?"


...Maher’s responses made me think about a question we hear a lot during our media training sessions: What should I do if I’m asked a question about a topic I wasn’t originally booked to speak about? Do I have to answer it, or can I insist on speaking only about the topic we agreed to discuss in advance?...

Jeff Domansky's insight:

Brad Phillips shares how to stay in control of a media interview.

Amanda Nadon-Langlois's curator insight, October 14, 2014 10:06 AM

As a PR professional in training, I somewhat agree with this article. Refusing to answer by saying "no comment" or something of the sort, will cause for speculation. However, I agree that giving a short answer and moving away from the topic is great advice.