Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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Happier Students, Higher Scores: The Role of Arts Integration - The Edvocate

Happier Students, Higher Scores: The Role of Arts Integration - The Edvocate | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"The arts have always had a secondary place in K-12 learning. If you doubt that statement, think of the first programs to go whenever budget cuts are implemented – music, fine arts and even physical fitness which includes dance. I’ve yet to hear of a school board or administrators discussing the way cutting math programs could help the school’s bottom line. There is a hierarchy of academics in America, and arts education tends to fall pretty low on the totem pole.'

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Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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Innovation Playlist

Innovation Playlist | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Face it. Like all organizations, schools get locked into routine, impeding change. But all schools need to innovate to prepare kids for a dynamic and uncertain future. The question is, “How?” The Innovation Playlist can help your school make positive, informed change. It represents a teacher-led model, based on small steps leading to big change, that draws on best practices from outstanding educators and non-profits from across the country.

The Innovation Playlist consists of albums (the big goals on the left) and tracks (the small steps on the right that help you reach each big goal). Each track can be done quickly — fifteen minutes to a day or two — with minimal downside and lots of upside. The playlist process can be led by a school’s principal, by faculty at the school, grade or department level, or even by a family at home.

Via Jim Lerman
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The Visible Learning Research - John Hattie Updated June 2019

The Visible Learning Research - John Hattie Updated June 2019 | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"John Hattie of the University of Melbourne, Australia, has long researched performance indicators and evaluation in education. His research, Visible Learning, is the culmination of more than 25 years of examining and synthesizing more than 1,600 meta-analyses comprising more than 95,000 studies involving more than 300 million students around the world.

Hattie’s research is now the world’s largest evidence base on what works best in schools to improve learning.

Hattie wanted to understand which variables were the most important. Although “almost everything we do improves learning,” why not prioritize the ones that will have the greatest effect?

Hattie set about calculating a score or “effect size” for each, according to its bearing on student learning and taking into account such aspects as its cost to implement. The average effect size was 0.4, a marker that represented a year’s growth per year of schooling for a student. Anything above 0.4 would have a greater positive effect on student learning."

 

Download all 250 Influencers - June 2019

 

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These 7 Podcasts Are the Perfect Way to Get the Day Started and Set Yourself Up for Success (One for Every Day of the Week)

These 7 Podcasts Are the Perfect Way to Get the Day Started and Set Yourself Up for Success (One for Every Day of the Week) | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Being a morning person increases productivity, helps you achieve goals, and can actually make you more successful. (It's true--science said so.)

But it's not always easy to make the most of our AM hours. If your morning routine needs a refresh, listening to podcasts could be the answer. They're the perfect outlet for boosting focus and excitement in the morning and are easily accessible (and free!).

And since there are currently over 750,000 podcasts out there, I've narrowed it down for you. Below are seven--one for each day of the week--that are sure to jump start your day.
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Concrete Ways To Help Students Self-Regulate And Prioritize Work | MindShift | KQED News

Concrete Ways To Help Students Self-Regulate And Prioritize Work | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
There are a lot of skills necessary to succeed in school that aren't directly about mastering content, including the ability to recognize, name and control ones emotions. The school day often comes with lots of emotion, everything from elation to frustration, which makes it the perfect place to practice self-regulation.

"One of the most authentic ways for me to help them expand their own vocabulary is to use my personal experience with my own emotions in the classroom," said Lindsey Minder, a second grade teacher. She regularly models describing how she's feeling and why throughout the school day, as well as demonstrating simple practices like taking a deep breath to calm down.

"One of the critical features of learning is modeling," said Linda Darling-Hammond, president and CEO of the Learning Policy Institute in an Edutopia series on the science of learning. "We learn by watching others. In this classroom, we see the teacher modeling her recognition of her emotions and also modeling how she deals with them in productive ways. And that is the first step in helping children learn to manage their own emotions."
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8 Student-Made Podcasts That Made Us Smile | MindShift | KQED News

8 Student-Made Podcasts That Made Us Smile | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
This year, NPR held its first Student Podcast Challenge — a podcast contest for students in grades 5 through 12. As we listened to the almost 6,000 entries, we smiled, laughed, and even cried. Students opened their lives to us with stories about their families, their schools and communities and their hopes for the future.

We named our winners last month — the eighth graders of Bronx Prep Middle School in New York, and the eleventh graders of Elizabethton High School in Tennessee.

But lots of other students blew us away. Here, for your listening pleasure, are just some of the many podcast entries that made us smile — and reminded us what it's like to be in middle and high school.
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A Comprehensive Framework For Student Motivation - TeachThought

A Comprehensive Framework For Student Motivation - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
When researching student motivation and gamification a few years ago, I came across the most comprehensive gamification framework I’ve ever seen. Developed by gamification expert Yu-kai Chou, it was an ambitious effort that distinguished black hat gamification (which is “bad”–think Farmville and Candy Crush) from white hat gamification (which is “good”–think Minecraft or even an ACT score). (It’s also copyrighted, but they graciously allowed us to use it.
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We've Said Goodbye to This Year's Students. Now It’s Time to Take Care of Ourselves - Education Week Teacher

We've Said Goodbye to This Year's Students. Now It’s Time to Take Care of Ourselves - Education Week Teacher | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Teachers are notorious for taking care of everyone but ourselves. The coming summer provides a perfect chance to change that.

Some of us will seek the luxury of a true physical, mental, and emotional break from the classroom. Others will leap directly into teaching summer school in order to cobble together a full salary. Or we’ll attend more conferences and trainings in the next two months than in the last 10 put together.

Every teacher, even those of us in the throes of summer school and professional development, should make time to answer an existential question: Who are we when we’re not teaching?

Here are four ideas for making the most of that oasis of time between the end of this school year and the beginning of the next.
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Not Enough Time to Teach Social-Emotional Learning? Try These 4 Easy Steps. | EdSurge News

Not Enough Time to Teach Social-Emotional Learning? Try These 4 Easy Steps. | EdSurge News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Social-emotional learning (SEL) has become a top implementation priority for districts, ed-tech companies and education researchers, and for good reason: Kids need it.

With the rise in youth suicide rates, increased numbers of violent incidents in schools and the growing rate of American youth diagnosed with mental health issues such as anxiety and depression, the social emotional instability of America’s youth has, according to some experts, become a national crisis. Many are turning to SEL as a means to address this growing concern and spark conversation around sensitive or vulnerable topics.
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15 Great Read-Aloud Books for Older Kids - ReadBrightly

15 Great Read-Aloud Books for Older Kids - ReadBrightly | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Reading to your children is one of the best things you can do as a parent — on this, everyone agrees. But parents of older children don’t always want to admit to still reading aloud to their kids. It can come out more like a confession, as if at some point along the way we should have stopped, some age when reading is supposed to become a silent, independent activity. But reading aloud in the evenings was mainstay of family time long before radios and televisions and laptops appeared on the scene.

Just because someone can read perfectly fine themselves doesn’t mean they can’t look forward to hearing a great story, especially from a person they love. And some books are simply made for an audience. I often scour piles at the library and bookstore for books that combine great stories with great illustrations to keep everyone interested. Read Aloud America, a nonprofit, puts out an annual list of great books to read aloud to kids of all ages. Below are a few mom favorites for anyone looking to pick up a book and cozy up with their big kids for storytime tonight:
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Teachers Seek to Unravel #Myths Around #Reading and #Dyslexia - Edutopia

Teachers Seek to Unravel #Myths Around #Reading and #Dyslexia - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Teachers are seeking new training to understand the brain science around dyslexia, the most commonly reported disability among children.
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Let them play! Kids need freedom from play restrictions to develop - The Conversation

Let them play! Kids need freedom from play restrictions to develop - The Conversation | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
You may have heard of play. It’s that thing children do – the diverse range of unstructured, spontaneous activities and behaviours.

Children play in many ways, including by exploring movements, constructing with equipment, creating games, using imagination and chasing others around a playground.

The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child recognises play as every child’s basic right. But play is becoming extinct. Global studies, across generations, have confirmed outdoor children’s play has been declining, across all age groups, for decades.


Play is every child’s basic right. from shutterstock.com
Unstructured play improves learning and social and physical development. Providing a variety of play options, improved play access and fewer restrictions can encourage children to engage in physical activity with peers in line with their imaginations.
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Going for Depth: How Schools and Teachers Can Foster Meaningful Learning Experiences | MindShift | KQED News

Going for Depth: How Schools and Teachers Can Foster Meaningful Learning Experiences | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
There are no magic solutions in education. But after visiting 30 schools, conducting 300 interviews and sitting in on classes for 750 hours, authors Jal Mehta and Sarah Fine, who wrote In Search of Deeper Learning: The Quest to Remake the American High School, have much to say about how the best schools and teachers operate. What they noticed, in particular, was how these teachers and the administrations that support them invite students to engage deeply in their educations.
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10 Reasons You Should Read Aloud to Big Kids, Too | Common Sense Media

10 Reasons You Should Read Aloud to Big Kids, Too | Common Sense Media | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Every parent knows that it's good to read to kids when they're little. It helps babies, toddlers, and preschoolers develop spoken language, recognize letters and words, and get ready for kindergarten. But it's actually beneficial to read to kids even after they can read on their own. Research shows that continued reading aloud after age 5 (and well beyond) improves reading and listening skills and academic performance (and is also loads of fun!).

According to Scholastic's 2016 Kids & Family Reading Report -- a national survey of children age 6 to 17 and their parents that explores attitudes and behaviors around books and reading -- 59 percent of parents read to kids from birth to age 5, but only 38 percent read to their 5- to 8-year-olds, and a scant 17 percent keep reading to kids age 9 to 11. Yet most kids age 6 to 11 (and most parents) report that they enjoy read-aloud time. Everyone loves a good story, whether it's in the form of a paper book, an ebook, an audiobook, or even a podcast.

Find suggestions for great family-tested reads on our list Amazing Read-Aloud Books for Older Kids. And for even more ideas, see our lists Read-Aloud Books and 50 Books All Kids Should Read Before They're 12.

Here are 10 key reasons to keep reading aloud to older kids:
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3 Ways to Build Student Agency into Your Lessons by by Catlin Tucker

3 Ways to Build Student Agency into Your Lessons by by Catlin Tucker | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Although many teachers recognize the importance of making students active agents in the classroom, it is easy to overlook student agency when we plan our lessons. However, the ability to make key decisions about their learning is a powerful motivator for students. If they are invited to tailor the learning to their interests, decide how to approach a problem, or determine what they will create, it makes them feel valued as individual learners. It also has the advantage of getting more students to lean into the learning happening in the classroom.

 

When I work with teachers designing lessons using blended learning models, I encourage them to think about where in the lesson they can hand over decision making power to the students. A simple approach is to think about the what, how, and why of a lesson, assignment, or project and give students the opportunity to answer one of those questions."


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Lạc Việt Audio's comment, June 16, 10:56 PM
Mua dàn karaoke chất lượng tại Lạc Việt Audio. https://amthanhthudo.com/dan-karaoke-hay
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Want Teachers to Motivate Their Students? Teach Them How to Do It - EdWeek

Want Teachers to Motivate Their Students? Teach Them How to Do It - EdWeek | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Most teachers intrinsically understand the need to motivate their students, experts say, but teaching on intuition alone can lead to missteps in student engagement.

A study released in May by the Mindset Scholars Network, a collaborative of researchers who study student motivation, found most teacher education programs nationwide do not include explicit training for teachers on the science of how to motivate students.

That’s why some teacher education programs are exploring ways to help teachers learn how to engage their students in deeper ways.
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Using Social Media For Learning | Maker Maven | STEAM | Makerspace Resources

"Let's be honest, we all know that students are spending a lot of their free time on social media so let's look for safe and productions ways to use social media and technology with our students. Social media is a very useful learning tool because of its ability to bring learning experiences closer to the real world. In this post, we are going to give you several ideas for taking advantage of this increase in technology for better learning experiences. "

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When Kids Ask Really Tough Questions: A Quick Guide | MindShift | KQED News

When Kids Ask Really Tough Questions: A Quick Guide | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
I know she died, but when is Grandma coming back?

Why is your skin darker than Mommy's?

Why do we live here but Daddy doesn't?

Are you the tooth fairy?

Anyone with kids in their life knows what it's like to be surprised by a tough question. It can come at any time, often when you least expect it: at breakfast, at bedtime or from the back seat.
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25 Ways to Use Sticky Notes in the Classroom - We Are Teachers

25 Ways to Use Sticky Notes in the Classroom - We Are Teachers | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Sticky notes got their start nearly 40 years ago, when 3M introduced the now-classic yellow Post-it Notes. In the years since, their popularity has skyrocketed, and they’re now available in every shape, size, and color you can imagine. They have endless applications, especially in schools; teachers use sticky notes for math, reading, art, planning, and so much more. Here are 25 clever ways to use sticky notes in the classroom.
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How Stress Affects Your Memory | MindShift | KQED News

How Stress Affects Your Memory | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
We've all had the experience of studying hard for a test, believing we know the information, and then sitting down in the testing room only to draw a blank. Why does that happen?

In this TED-Ed video, Elizabeth Cox explains there are many kinds of stress and many kinds of memory, but short term stress can affect a person's ability to recall facts. There are three basic steps to learning new information: acquisition, consolidation and retrieval. Moderate stress related to the memory task itself can actually have a positive affect on the acquisition and consolidation phases. The brain releases corticosteriods when stressed, which prompt the amygdala to tell the hippocampus to consolidate a memory. The stress signals to the brain that the information is worth remembering, but other emotions can be equally helpful to encode memories.
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‘It’s OK to not be OK:’ How One High School Saved Lives with a 34-Question Survey | MindShift | KQED News

‘It’s OK to not be OK:’ How One High School Saved Lives with a 34-Question Survey | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
It was 10:30 a.m. on a Monday in April. Nine counselors, psychologists, and therapists sat around a table in a conference room at Cañon City High School in southern Colorado.

In classrooms around the building, the school’s ninth-graders whizzed through an online mental health survey that would soon deliver real-time data to the group in the conference room. They were a triage team of sorts — particularly interested in the answers to question 24, which asked how often students had had thoughts of hurting themselves within the past week.

By 10:35 a.m., most of the results were in. Over the next few hours, team members pulled students who had responded “very often” or “often” out of class for private one-on-one conversations.

The overarching message to students, said Jamie Murray, a district psychologist who helped coordinate the effort, was “It’s OK to not be OK.”
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Forget 'sit-and-get': 3 approaches are transforming professional development

Forget 'sit-and-get': 3 approaches are transforming professional development | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Technology is making it easier for administrators to provide relevant, real-time and focused PD opportunities, but leaders say maintaining time for connection and collaboration is key.

Via Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.
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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, June 5, 9:38 AM

Time for collaboration, planning, connection, exchange of ideas. These will remain important for educators so if they can "do" their PD on their own time but still have time together and time with a coach, this could work very effectively and powerfully.

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Young Adults Don’t Read. Here’s What We Can Do About It. | EdSurge News

Young Adults Don’t Read. Here’s What We Can Do About It. | EdSurge News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Compared with the past, the majority of young adults don’t read for pleasure. It’s not that they can’t. It’s that they choose not to.

In 1980, 60 percent of 12th graders said they read a book, newspaper or magazine every day that wasn’t assigned for school, one study found. By 2016, only 16 percent did—a huge drop, even though the book, newspaper or magazine could be one read on a digital device (the survey question doesn’t specify format). The number of 12th graders who said they had not read any books for pleasure in the last year nearly tripled, landing at one out of three.

As a librarian, that hurts my heart more than a little bit. Having spent almost half my career trying to put the right book in the hands of every kid, it feels more than a little demoralizing.

Reading has the potential to open doors, expand horizons, and provide escape. But it’s also the perfect vehicle for information, for figuring out a how-to or just keeping up with interests that have nothing to do with a book. In the academic world, with the best of intentions toward churning out lifelong readers, I think sometimes we make the path to readerhood a bit single-minded.
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Lisa Nielsen: The Innovative Educator: Lessons for Teachers about The World's Largest Minority Group

Lisa Nielsen: The Innovative Educator: Lessons for Teachers about The World's Largest Minority Group | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Victor Calise, Commissioner at the Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities and Haben Girma, the first deaf-blind person to graduate from Harvard Law, shared several lessons about the world's largest minority group with attendees at the NYC Department of Education's Accessibility Expo. The Expo was held at Brooklyn Law School on May 31st. 

Don't know what the largest minority group is? It is people with disabilities. They make up about one billion people world-wide.
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Discipline or Treatment? Schools Rethinking Vaping Response - EdWeek

Discipline or Treatment? Schools Rethinking Vaping Response - EdWeek | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
A glimpse of student athletes in peak physical condition vaping just moments after competing in a football game led Stamford High School Principal Raymond Manka to reconsider his approach to the epidemic.

His school traditionally has emphasized discipline for those caught with e-cigarettes. Punishments become increasingly severe with each offense, from in-school suspensions to out-of-school suspensions and, eventually, notification of law enforcement.

But Manka began thinking about it more as an addiction problem, and less of a behavior issue, after seeing the two players from another school vaping near their bus. "It broke my heart," said Manka, whose school is now exploring how to offer cessation programs for students caught vaping or with vaping paraphernalia.

"We've got to figure out how we can help these kids wean away from bad habits that might hurt their body or their mind or otherwise create behaviors that can create habits that will be harmful for the remainder of their lives," he said.
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For the sake of our health, we need to kick the indoor habit | Vybarr Cregan-Reid | Opinion | The Guardian

For the sake of our health, we need to kick the indoor habit | Vybarr Cregan-Reid | Opinion | The Guardian | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
As a species we need to get out more. Humans now spend so much time indoors that many of us are cultivating a variety of serious health complaints, and for some they could be fatal. It is not so much that outdoor time is inherently good; more that our bodies are built to anticipate it and the way we live now is confusing to our systems. Nearly two decades ago a study published in Nature magazine concluded that the average American spent 93% of their time indoors. And that was before tablets and smartphones.
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