Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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How to Add Questions for Students to YouTube Videos - jonathanwylie.com

How to Add Questions for Students to YouTube Videos - jonathanwylie.com | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"With the popularity of flipped classrooms showing no sign of waning, a new crop of web tools for teachers are emerging to help support instruction. In this post, I take a look at three ways that teachers can add questions to a YouTube video for their students to answer when watching a video at home or on their own."

Christine Peterson's curator insight, December 29, 2013 2:34 PM

Improving an otherwise rather passive  learning

 

Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Professional learning in a glance (or two)!
Curated by John Evans
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Student Agency: What Do Students Want to Create to Demonstrate Their Learning?  (Don't just differentiate the task - differentiate the assessment)  by Catlin Tucker

Student Agency: What Do Students Want to Create to Demonstrate Their Learning?  (Don't just differentiate the task - differentiate the assessment)  by Catlin Tucker | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
by Catlin Tucker

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Why Teens Should Understand Their Own Brains (And Why Their Teachers Should, Too!) | MindShift | KQED News

Why Teens Should Understand Their Own Brains (And Why Their Teachers Should, Too!) | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
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A teenage brain is a fascinating, still-changing place. There's a lot going on: social awareness, risk-taking, peer pressure; all are heightened during this period.

Until relatively recently, it was thought that the brain was only actively developing during childhood, but in the last two decades, researchers have confirmed that the brain continues to develop during adolescence — a period of time that can stretch from the middle school years into early adulthood.

"We were always under the assumption that the brain doesn't change very much after childhood," explains Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, a professor of cognitive neuroscience at University College London.

But that's simply not the case, she says, and educators — and teens themselves — can learn a lot from this.
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50 Examples Of Analogies For Critical Thinking - TeachThought

50 Examples Of Analogies For Critical Thinking - TeachThought | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
In our guide to teaching with analogies, we offered ideas, definitions, categories, and examples of analogies.

This post is a more specific version of that article where we focus specifically on types and examples of analogies rather than looking at teaching with analogies more broadly. Below, we offer more than 20 different types of analogies and examples of type of analogy as well–which results in nearly 100 examples of analogies overall.

Note that because an analogy is simply a pattern established by the nature of a relationship between two ‘things,’ there are an infinite number of kinds of analogies. You could, for example, set up an analogy by pairing two objects only loosely connected–brick and road, for example: a brick is to a road as…
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I’m a Peace Teacher. Here’s How Brain Science Helps My Kids Handle Conflict. | EdSurge News :: Linda Ryden

I’m a Peace Teacher. Here’s How Brain Science Helps My Kids Handle Conflict. | EdSurge News :: Linda Ryden | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"I can say without a doubt that the lessons...my students are learning in peace class are changing their lives. I see it in action every day. Kids tell me all the time about how they got angry or stressed during a test or a baseball game or a conflict on the playground and how they were able to use their mindful breathing skills to help them to calm down. Imagine what our world would be like if all children were taught to understand their own brains, regulate their own emotions and work out conflicts peacefully. It has never been more important to prepare our children to create a more peaceful world."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

A great example of action research by a highly motivated educator -- leading to a transformation of the culture of her school. Well worth reading.


Via Jim Lerman
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Ward Melville High helps staff de-stress with relaxing music, soft lighting

Ward Melville High helps staff de-stress with relaxing music, soft lighting | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
District officials are touting a newly created wellness room at Ward Melville High School as a lesson in serenity, where the surroundings help teachers and staff de-stress over the course of a hectic
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Math Card Games That Will Help Students Practice Their Skills - We Are Teachers

Math Card Games That Will Help Students Practice Their Skills - We Are Teachers | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Looking for ways to make your math learning a little more interesting? Grab a few decks of playing cards and introduce some of these math card games to your class. Your students will have fun in spades!
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Tips And Tricks Parents Can Use To Nurture a Love of Reading in Kids | MindShift | KQED News

Tips And Tricks Parents Can Use To Nurture a Love of Reading in Kids | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

For many families, reading is a pleasurable activity when kids are young, but becomes a battle as kids get older. Parents are more aware than ever that strong reading skills are fundamental to academic success. Teachers also feel pressure to make sure students are reading on or above grade level, often with their evaluations and salaries hanging in the balance. On top of it all, parents are increasingly finding that it’s hard to tempt kids to read when there are more alluring entertainment options like video games, social media and TV to occupy their time. All of this has turned reading into a battleground, when it should be a joyful experience.

“Your job is to teach your children how to love to read,” said Pamela Paul on KQED’s Forum program. Paul edits the New York Times Book Review and co-authored, with Maria Russo, the book How to Raise a Reader.

Paul understands parental anxiety about setting children up for success -- she has three children herself -- but she reminds parents that it’s the teacher's job to teach kids how to read. They are the ones focused on raising reading levels and giving assessments to determine reading levels. If parents focus too much adingon their child’s reading level, obsessing over what group they’re in and how they compare to other students, they risk making reading seem like a chore to their kids.

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Applications of Calculus in Real life - However, Mathematics

We learn about calculus in high school and we know it includes integration and differentiation. But what does it actually use for and how? The language of calculus appears everywhere in modern science and technology whether we’re modeling the rise in the fall of the stock market or determining exactly when a space rocket will arrive into Earth’s orbit.
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How to Help Your Body Adjust to Cold Weather - TIME

How to Help Your Body Adjust to Cold Weather - TIME | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Fall is here, and the mercury is falling in thermostats across the northern hemisphere. The good news: Not only will your body acclimate to the…
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How to Help Teenage Girls Reframe Anxiety and Strengthen Resilience | MindShift | KQED News

How to Help Teenage Girls Reframe Anxiety and Strengthen Resilience | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
In the last decade, rates of anxiety-related disorders in teenagers have steadily risen, particularly in girls. Researchers and psychologists posit several hypotheses about why these rates are on the rise -- from digital hyperconnectivity to heightened external pressures to simply a greater awareness, and therefore diagnosis, of mental health concerns.

Whatever the causes, Dr. Lisa Damour has hopeful news for parents and teens: first, some degree of stress and anxiety is not only normal but essential for human growth. And if those levels become untenable, there are tested strategies for reining anxiety back in.
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Many Kids Don’t Like To Talk in Class. Here Are New Ways To Engage Them. - SLJ

Many Kids Don’t Like To Talk in Class. Here Are New Ways To Engage Them. - SLJ | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
n classrooms, labs, and libraries where student discussion is encouraged, many may be talking—but not all may be participating. Students speak less for a multitude of reasons. They may be shy, introverted, or struggling to master a new language, for instance.


Tracey Wong’s project, in which students
created Braille books, generated high interest and enthusiastic conversation.
Photo courtesy of Tracey Wong/Yonkers Public Schools
All of those who are silent in a discussion-based classroom lose valuable opportunities to grow—and the class misses out on their insights. A range of strategies can be used to include students in the conversation, from highlighting the contributions and competence of quieter students to using technology to enable participation. Since librarians often see the same class only once a week, they need to quickly and efficiently triage negative student interactions that may have developed since the last meeting with ready procedures to help quiet students speak up.
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How Helping Students to Ask Better Questions Can Transform Classrooms | MindShift | KQED News

How Helping Students to Ask Better Questions Can Transform Classrooms | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Educators and parents have long known that curiosity is at the center of powerful learning. But too often, in the push to meet standards and pressure to stay on pace, that essential truth about learning that sticks gets lost. Worse, many older students have forgotten how to ask their own questions about the world, afraid that if they wonder they will be wrong. It’s far less risky to sit back and wait for the teacher to ask the questions. And yet, good questioning may be the most basic tenet of lifelong learning and independent thinking that school offers students. Taking the time to activate curiosity doesn’t have to mean abandoning learning standards, nor is it necessarily a waste of time.
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The Power of the Positive Phone Call Home - Edutopia

The Power of the Positive Phone Call Home - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Calling students’ parents or guardians with good news encourages more good behavior and creates strong teacher-student bonds.
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Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Emotional Well-Being | MindShift | KQED News

Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Emotional Well-Being | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Feeling stressed? Just eight techniques — a "buffet of life skills" — can make a significant improvement in well-being, say scientists who taught the techniques to caregivers of people with dementia. After learning techniques such as how to keep a gratitude journal, for example, and how to quickly reframe negative experiences in a positive light — these family caregivers reported impressive decreases in both stress and anxiety.
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McGill Personal Finance Essentials - FREE Online Course Starting in January 2020

McGill Personal Finance Essentials - FREE Online Course Starting in January 2020 | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
If you're ready to take charge of your personal finances, then you're in the right place. From budgeting to borrowing, real estate and beyond, invest a few hours in this free, online course1 and you'll gain the knowledge and confidence to make a lifetime of smart financial decisions. Taught by professors from McGill University's Desautels Faculty of Management, the course is open to everyone.

Finish all course modules to receive a McGill Personal Finance Essentials attestation of completion2.


Join us and take charge of your financial future!
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Why Teachers Want Math with More Human Ties | MindShift | KQED News

Why Teachers Want Math with More Human Ties | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Mathematics is created by humans, math teachers are humans and math students are humans. Yet many contemporary math classrooms erase humans from the equation.

“Often mathematics is talked about as if it were apolitical, objective, and cold. A sterile textbook, a teacher writing on a chalkboard and rarely turning around,” said Sam Shah, a high school math teacher in Brooklyn, New York.

For many students, that model of math class is unengaging or anxiety-provoking.
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4 Instructional Practices with Impact on Student Achievement - The Journal

4 Instructional Practices with Impact on Student Achievement - The Journal | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Among 32 instructional practices examined in a recent research project, teachers' general instruction and classroom management — and not their prowess with reading and writing instruction — made the difference to student achievement. Four practices had the biggest impact: fostering student engagement, having students participate in discussions, having fewer class period disruptions and developing a classroom climate that was conducive to instruction. What didn't? Connecting lessons to the real world.
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How to Maintain Students’ Motivation for Learning as the Year Goes On - Edutopia

How to Maintain Students’ Motivation for Learning as the Year Goes On - Edutopia | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
It’s likely that your hard work orchestrating the first weeks of school enhanced your students’ connection to the school community and their enthusiasm for the learning to come. However, as the semester goes on and you seek to sustain that motivated momentum, you may not be able to find the same amount of prep time that you dedicated to the start of the year.

Yet even when your students’ bubbles of excitement fade, you can reboot their connections, engagement, and motivation with the help of insights from neuroscience research.
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The key to educational success? Side with the teacher, not your child - Telegraph

The key to educational success? Side with the teacher, not your child - Telegraph | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
It takes a village to raise a child. Parents and teachers should be a team – in total harmony in their shared goal of helping children develop in both learning and life. You should always back the teacher in front of your child. That used to be common sense. Unfortunately, it no longer is. There needs to be a united front where the teacher and parent are seen to be working together, but when I made this simple point on social media this week, I received a blast of online criticism.
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What's the best way to learn? 85% rule means it's OK to fail  - Today

What's the best way to learn? 85% rule means it's OK to fail  - Today | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
"Perfection is not going to be optimal for learning."
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Why Normalizing Struggle Can Create a Better Math Experience for Kids | MindShift | KQED News

Why Normalizing Struggle Can Create a Better Math Experience for Kids | MindShift | KQED News | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
Math educator Dan Finkel grew up doing math with ease and completed calculus as a freshman in high school. But it wasn't until he went to math summer camp and learned how to think like a mathematician that he truly fell in love with math. It helps to have a positive relationship with math because when people are uncomfortable with it they are susceptible to manipulation. (Think of predatory lending interest rates, convenient statistics to support a thin argument, graphs that misrepresent the truth.)

“When we’re not comfortable with math, we don't question the authority of numbers,” said Finkel in his TEDx Talk, “Five ways to share math with kids.”
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Putting People First: Leading in an Era of Constant Transformation – Tanmay Vora @tnvora via Nicolino Frate @nickfrate

Putting People First: Leading in an Era of Constant Transformation – Tanmay Vora @tnvora via Nicolino Frate @nickfrate | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

"Leading in an era of constant disruption, change and transformation is not easy. In such transformation efforts, soft aspects of leadership play as crucial role as the hard aspects like systems thinking, innovation and execution of change.

Last week, I saw an insightful TED talk by Jim Hemerling where he outlined 5 ways to lead in an era of constant changes. He says..."

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Why your brain's so bad at letting go of negative comments - Fast Company

Why your brain's so bad at letting go of negative comments - Fast Company | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
For the past six years, I have done a radio show and podcast called Two Guys on Your Head, produced by our local NPR affiliate, KUT. The show airs on Friday mornings. It is great fun to do, and we get lots of positive feedback from listeners around town. But, as with all things, not everybody likes it. We get some emails from listeners taking exception to things we’ve talked about, and we also get some snarky comments on social media.

As you might expect, no matter how many people say nice things, it’s the negative comments that really stick with me. I will find myself chewing over complaints people have made for days. Those negative thoughts bring down my mood and make me feel worse about what I’m working on.

I’m guessing you’ve had a similar experience, where you noticed that even one negative comment about you or your performance can outweigh a huge volume of positive feedback. There are several reasons why these sorts of comments have such an outsized impact on your psyche.
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A Principal's Reflections: Don't Forget Closure - Eric Sheninger @E_Sheninger

A Principal's Reflections: Don't Forget Closure - Eric Sheninger @E_Sheninger | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it
While the opening moments with students are crucial, so are the final minutes. Think about this for a second. What’s the point of an objective or learning target, whether stated, on the board, or students have the opportunity to later discover for themselves, if there is no opportunity at the end to determine if it was met or reflected upon? Closure matters, yet virtually every lesson I observe in schools across the country are missing the crucial component. Here’s why. Learning increases when lessons are concluded in a manner that helps students organize and remember the point of the lesson. Closure draws attention to the end of the lesson, helps students organize their learning, reinforces the significant aspects of the lesson, allows students to practice what is learned, and provides an opportunity for feedback, review, and reflective thinking.
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Claire Wardle: How you can help transform the internet into a place of trust | TED Talk

Claire Wardle: How you can help transform the internet into a place of trust | TED Talk | Professional Learning for Busy Educators | Scoop.it

How can we stop the spread of misleading, sometimes dangerous content while maintaining an internet with freedom of expression at its core? Misinformation expert Claire Wardle explores the new challenges of our polluted online environment and maps out a plan to transform the internet into a place of trust -- with the help everyday users. "Together, let's rebuild our information commons," she says.

John Evans's curator insight, October 25, 2019 6:44 AM

I believe one way to help stem the spread of misinformation is to educate our students by embedding the topics of media literacy and digital citizenship  throughout all curriculum areas. Thoughts? JE