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Tree-shaped Wind-turbines shows Biomimicry at its Best

Tree-shaped Wind-turbines shows Biomimicry at its Best | Proballeinology | Scoop.it
Biomimicry or biomimetics is the imitation of the models, systems, and elements of nature for the purpose of solving complex human problems

Via Miguel Prazeres
Michael Holder's curator insight, January 13, 2015 5:43 PM

Perhaps the beginning of the end and the extinction of mammoth Industrial Wind Turbines and their globally corrupt Corporate boon-doggle. One can only hope - good riddance!  

Proballeinology
The Science  of Problem Solving Designs, Biomimicry, innovation, creativity, scenius, genius, student centered education,
Curated by Leonard Howard
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CLASS INFORMATION

MONDAY 2-16

NOTEBOOK TURN-IN



FRIDAY 2-13

KITES: DAY ONE

LAB REPORT QUESTIONS

MOVE DESKS TO GROUPS OF 2 OR 3

START A NEW PAGE IN YOUR NOTES TITLED:

KITES DAY ONE: LAB QUESTIONS


THURSDAY 2-12

X Y Z GROUPS


WEDNESDAY 2-11 TILL ?

A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE PROBLEM

MOVE TO GROUPS OF 2, 3, OR 4 DESKS FACING EACH OTHER

PREPARE FOR CLASS:

START A NEW PAGE IN YOUR NOTES LABELED:

KITES: DAY ONE

AT END OF CLASS RETURN DESKS TO OUTER WALL


TUESDAY 2-10 IS KITE DAY

DRESS APPROPRIATELY FOR THE WEATHER AND CONDITIONS


MONDAY 2-9

A PROBLEM

A SOLUTION?

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Mycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungal guilds compete for the same organic substrates but affect decomposition differently - Functional Ecology

Mycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungal guilds compete for the same organic substrates but affect decomposition differently - Functional Ecology | Proballeinology | Scoop.it
Communities of litter saprotrophic and root-associated fungi are vertically separated within boreal forest soil profiles. It is unclear whether this depth partitioning is maintained exclusively by substrate-mediated niche partitioning (i.e. distinct fundamental niches), or by competition for space and resources (i.e. distinct realised niches). Improved understanding of the mechanisms driving spatial partitioning of these fungal guilds is critical, as they modulate carbon and nutrient cycling in different ways. Under field settings, we tested the effects of substrate quality and the local fungal species pool at various depths in determining the potential of saprotrophic and mycorrhizal fungi to colonize and exploit organic matter. Natural substrates of three qualities – fresh or partly decomposed litter or humus – were incubated in the corresponding organic layers in a boreal forest soil profile in a fully factorial design. After one and two growing seasons, fungal community composition in the substrates was determined by 454-pyrosequencing and decomposition was analysed. Fungal community development during the course of the experiment was determined to similar degrees by vertical location of the substrates (24% of explained variation) and by substrate quality (20%), indicating that interference competition is a strong additional driver of the substrate-dependent depth partitioning of fungal guilds in the system. During the first growing season, litter substrates decomposed slower when colonized by root-associated communities than when colonized by communities of litter saprotrophs, whereas humus was only slightly decomposed by both fungal guilds. During the second season, however, certain basidiomycetes from both guilds were particularly efficient in localizing and exploiting their native organic substrates although displaced in the vertical profile, validating that fungal community composition, rather than microclimatic factors, were responsible for observed depth-related differences in decomposer activities during the first season. In conclusion, our results suggest that saprotrophic and root-associated fungal guilds have overlapping fundamental niches with respect to colonizing substrates of different qualities, and that their substrate-dependent depth partitioning in soils of ectomycorrhiza-dominated ecosystems is reinforced by interference competition. Through competitive interactions mycorrhizal fungi can thus indirectly regulate litter decomposition rates by restraining activities of more efficient litter saprotrophs.
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WFAA PROBLEM SOLVING

WFAA promotes math problem solving strategies that work. Mrs. Taylor's 5th grade class demonstrates and explains the math strategy.
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Hair Problem? No Problem

Hair Problem? No Problem | Proballeinology | Scoop.it
We all dream of having beautiful long locks. But these hair problems always rain on our parade - Hair fall, dryness, roughness, dullness and split ends. All you need is one solution that helps...

Via dilipbariya388
dilipbariya388's curator insight, January 15, 2015 3:36 AM

We all dream of having beautiful long locks. But these hair problems always rain on our parade - Hair fall, dryness, roughness

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The Rise of Biomimicry for Social Innovation

The Rise of Biomimicry for Social Innovation | Proballeinology | Scoop.it
Biomimicry, defined as the conscious emulation of nature, has been around for a long time. Indigenous peoples mimicked nature to adapt successfully to changing conditions. More recently, biomimicry...
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The Design Process - The Inspired Classroom

The Design Process - The Inspired Classroom | Proballeinology | Scoop.it
Tweet In this post, Judy Lee, an art teacher at the Seacoast Charter School in Kingston, NH, talks about the design process.  She shared this with teachers at the Teacher Art Retreat, so we were able to discuss these steps as we progressed through...

Via Karen Steffensen
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Janine Benyus: Biomimicry Is Innovation Inspired By Nature

Janine Benyus: Biomimicry Is Innovation Inspired By Nature | Proballeinology | Scoop.it
Janine Benyus helped bring the word biomimicry into 21st century vocabularies. What is biomimicry? Let Benyus explain in this video.
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Developing problem-solving skills on uninhabited islands - The Japan News

At 10:30 a.m. on May 20, 151 first-year students at Kanagawa Prefecture’s Hiratsuka municipal Kanda Middle School boarded a ship in Yokosuka in the same prefecture to travel to a small island about 1.7 kilometers from the city.
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DROPLETS TURBULENT STREAMLINING

Prove in tempo reale e slow motion al 40% su gocce di colorante alimentare in caduta libera sull'acqua. Utilizzato un pannello bianco retrosante ai bicchieri...
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Test to Destruction: "Aeroelasticity Matters" 1981 NASA Langley 1960-1981 Wind Tunnel Tests - YouTube

more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/ "Pages from the test diary of Langley Research Center from 1960 all the way until 1981." Includes many "test to destru...
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REFLECTION QUESTIONS

REFLECTION QUESTIONS | Proballeinology | Scoop.it

The 40 Reflection Questions
Backward-Looking:
1. How much did you know about the subject before we started?
2. What process did you go through to produce this piece?
3. Have you done a similar kind of work in the past (earlier in the year or in a previous grade; in school or out of school)?
4. In what ways have you gotten better at this kind of work?
5. In what ways do you think you need to improve?
6. What problems did you encounter while you were working on this piece? How did you solve them?
7. What resources did you use while working on this piece? Which ones were especially helpful? Which ones would you use again?
8. Does this work tell a story?
Inward-Looking:
9. How do you feel about this piece of work? What parts of it do you particularly like? Dislike? Why? What did/do you enjoy about this piece or work?
10. What was especially satisfying to you about either the process or the finished product?
11. What did/do you find frustrating about it?
12. What were your standards for this piece of work?
13. Did you meet your standards?
14. What were your goals for meeting this piece of work? Did your goals change as you worked on it? Did you meet your goals?
15. What does this piece reveal about you as a learner?
16. What did you learn about yourself as you worked on this piece?
17. Have you changed any ideas you used to have on this subject?
18. Find another piece of work that you did at the beginning of the year to compare and contrast with this what changes can you see?
19. How did those changes come about?
20. What does that tell you about yourself and how you learn?
Outward-Looking:
21. Did you do your work the way other people did theirs?
22. In what ways did you do it differently?
23. In what ways was your work or process similar?
24. If you were the teacher, what comments would you make about this piece?
25. What grade would you give it? Why?
26. What the one thing you particularly want people to notice when they look at your work?
27. What do your classmates particularly notice about your piece when they look at it?
28. In what ways did your work meet the standards for this assignment?
29. In what ways did it not meet those standards?
30. If someone else were looking at the piece, what might they learn about who you are?
Forward-Looking:
31. One thing I would like to improve upon is ...
32. What would you change if you had a chance to do this piece over again?
33. What will you change in the next revision of this piece?
34. What's the one thing that you have seen in your classmates' work or process that you would like to try in your next piece?
35. As you look at this piece, what's one thing that you would like to try to improve upon?
36. What's one goal you would like to set for yourself for next time?
37. What would you like to spend more time on in school?
38. What might you want next year's teacher to know about you (what things you're good at)?
39. What things you might want more help with?
40. What work would you show her to help her understand those things?

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YYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY

Shot 100% on the HD HERO3® camera from ‪http://GoPro.com. During the second stop of the ASP World Tour, 11 time world champion Kelly Slater catches a GoPro C...
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Frontiers | Using Ancient Traits to Convert Soil Health into Crop Yield: Impact of Selection on Maize Root and Rhizosphere Function | Plant Biotic Interactions

Frontiers | Using Ancient Traits to Convert Soil Health into Crop Yield: Impact of Selection on Maize Root and Rhizosphere Function | Plant Biotic Interactions | Proballeinology | Scoop.it
The effect of domestication and modern breeding on aboveground traits in maize (Zea mays) has been well-characterized, but the impact on root systems and the rhizosphere remain unclear. The transition from wild ecosystems to modern agriculture has focused on selecting traits that yielded the largest aboveground production with increasing levels of crop management and nutrient inputs. Root morphology, anatomy, and ecophysiological processes may have been affected by the substantial environmental and genetic shifts associated with this transition. As a result, root and rhizosphere traits that allow more efficient foraging and uptake in lower synthetic input environments might have been lost. The development of modern maize has led to a shift in microbiome community composition, but questions remain as to the dynamics and drivers of this change during maize evolution and its implications for resource acquisition and agroecosystem functioning under different management practices. Better understanding of how domestication and breeding affected root and rhizosphere microbial traits could inform breeding strategies, facilitate the sourcing of favorable alleles, and open new frontiers to improve resource use efficiency through greater integration of root development and ecophysiology with agroecosystem functioning.

Via Back to the Roots
Back to the Roots 's curator insight, April 19, 2016 3:08 AM
Really interesting review on the impact of maize domestication on the rhizosphere microbiome!
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Coursera - Free Online Courses From Top Universities

Coursera - Free Online Courses From Top Universities | Proballeinology | Scoop.it
Take free online classes from 120+ top universities and educational organizations. We partner with schools like Stanford, Yale, Princeton, and others to offer courses in dozens of topics, from computer science to teaching and beyond.
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How to Make Better Decisions with Creative Problem Solving

How to Make Better Decisions with Creative Problem Solving | Proballeinology | Scoop.it
How to Make Better Decisions and Solve Problems Faster - Techniques, Processes, Tools and Resources.
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Duke University's bird collision problem - WNCN

Duke University's bird collision problem - WNCN | Proballeinology | Scoop.it
Duke University has quite the bird problem on its hands. Students say more than 100 birds collided into university windows in just the last …
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Biomimicry Institute Biomimicry South... - Biomimicry Argentina | Facebook

Biomimicry Institute Biomimicry South Africa biomimicryswarm Australia Biomimicry Chicago BiomimicryNYC
BiomimicryTX Biomimicry Germany
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Biomimicry

Biomimicry | Proballeinology | Scoop.it
Key biomimicry ideas that have been a source of inspiration throughout the project.

Via Alejandro Diaz
Alejandro Diaz's curator insight, December 19, 2013 6:17 AM

The Sahara Forest Project: Biomimicry in action

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Latino students tackle problem-solving at UGA's FIESTA camp - Washington Times

Latino students tackle problem-solving at UGA's FIESTA camp - Washington Times | Proballeinology | Scoop.it
Seventeen lucky children put their minds together last week in a new summer day camp at the University of Georgia.
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Problem Solving

From the National Textile Center, but it has some great ideas on teaching students how to problem solve. Details obstacles to critical thinking, and also steps for problem solving.

Via Maureen Bales
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The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions | Proballeinology | Scoop.it

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

Phases

Chronologically, Kuhn distinguishes between various phases.[4]

Phase 1- It exists only once and is the pre-paradigm phase, in which there is no consensus on any particular theory, though the research being carried out can be considered scientific in nature. This phase is characterized by several incompatible and incomplete theories. If the actors in the pre-paradigm community eventually gravitate to one of these conceptual frameworks and ultimately to a widespread consensus on the appropriate choice of methods, terminology and on the kinds of experiment that are likely to contribute to increased insights.

Phase 2- Normal Science, begins, in which puzzles are solved within the context of the dominant paradigm. As long as there is consensus within the discipline, normal science continues. Over time, progress in normal science may reveal anomalies, facts that are difficult to explain within the context of the existing paradigm. While usually these anomalies are resolved, in some cases they may accumulate to the point where normal science becomes difficult and where weaknesses in the old paradigm are revealed.

Phase 3- This phase is a crisis. Crises are often resolved within the context of normal science. However, after significant efforts of normal science within a paradigm fail, science may enter the next phase.

Phase 4- Scientific revolution is the phase in which the underlying assumptions of the field are reexamined and a new paradigm is established.

Phase 5- Post-Revolution, the new paradigm’s dominance is established and so scientists return to normal science, solving puzzles within the new paradigm. [4]

A science may go through these cycles repeatedly, though Kuhn notes that it is a good thing for science that such shifts do not occur often or easily.

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Car Aerodynamics in a Wind Tunnel - YouTube

This is a bonus project for my ME 380 Fluid Dynamics course at UNLV. I do not own the rights to any of the video clips or music. Cars Featured: Pagani Zonda ...
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Life-Size Models Take You Inside Leonardo da Vinci's Workshop | WIRED

Life-Size Models Take You Inside Leonardo da Vinci's Workshop | WIRED | Proballeinology | Scoop.it
Leonardo da Vinci’s Workshop, an exhibit opening Friday in New York, features life-size models of the great inventor’s machines, including his Mechanical Lion (pictured), weapons of war and flying machines. Gallery: The Last Supper, Up Close and Digital The replicas were re-created from Leonardo’s personal notebooks, or codices, using authentic materials, according to a press…
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THINKING STRATEGIES

SPARKS OF GENIUS: RETHINKING THINKING

46 RULES OF GENIUS: RULE 4 "SEE WHAT'S NOT THERE"

FEEL BEFORE YOU THINK?

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KITES: DAY ONE

  • What was your previous experience with  Kites?
  • What was your previous experience of Aeronautics and Flight? (planes, birds, fish, others)
  • What were the directions for the Lab?
  • Describe the process that you went through to solve the problem.
  • Describe your actions and your thinking during Kites Day One.
  • Describe your actions and your thinking after Kites Day One.
  • What problems did you encounter?
  • What successes did you have?
  • Did you feel frustrated or feel like quitting?
  • Did you feel like you wanted to continue, learn more, and solve the problem?
  • What did you learn from your attempt at flying kites that will help you solve the problem?
  • What do you need to know and do now to solve the problem?
Leonard Howards insight:

WHAT'S THE PROBLEM

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