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What Factors Encourage Physician HIE Adoption, Use? | EHRintelligence.com

What Factors Encourage Physician HIE Adoption, Use? | EHRintelligence.com | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
Physician HIE adoption hinges on the ability of health information exchanges (HIE) to deliver trusted data as well as deliver a return on investment.

Via Technical Dr. Inc.
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Deerwalk #DidYouKnow #Physician #HIE Health #Information #Exchange #Adoption 

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PatientPing Lands $31.6M to Expand National Care Coordination Network

PatientPing Lands $31.6M to Expand National Care Coordination Network | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
Boston-based healthcare IT company PatientPing has raised $31.6 million from Andreessen Horowitz (Menlo Park) and Leerink Transformation Partners.
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#Population #Health #Management #DeerwalkInc 

#Population #Health #Management #DeerwalkInc  | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
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Number of Latinos Investing in US Businesses for Green Card Increasing | Latino Daily

Number of Latinos Investing in US Businesses for Green Card Increasing | Latino Daily | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
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How nine out of ten healthcare pages leak private data

A study by a Timothy Libert, a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania, has found that nine out of ten visitsto health-related web pages result in data being leaked to third parties like Google, Facebook and Experian:

There is a significant risk to your privacy whenever you visit a health-related web page. An analysis of over 80,000 such web pages shows that nine out of ten visits result in personal health information being leaked to third parties, including online advertisers and data brokers.

What Libert discovered is a widespread repetition of the flaw that the US government's flagship Healthcare.gov website was dragged over the coals for in January.

The sites in question use code from third parties to provide things like advertising, web analytics and social media sharing widgets on their pages. Because of the way those kinds of widgets work, their third party owners can see what pages you're visiting.

The companies supplying the code aren't necessarily seeking information about what you're looking at but they're getting it whether they want it or not.

So if you browse the pages about genital herpes on the highly respected CDC (Centres for Disease Control and Prevention) site you'll also be telling marketing mega-companies Twitter, Facebook and AddThis that you've an interest in genital herpes too.

It happens like this: when your browser fetches a web page, it also fetches any third party code embedded in it directly from the third parties' websites. The requests sent by your browser contain an HTTP header (the annoyingly misspelled 'referer' header) that includes the URL of the page you're looking at.

Since URLs tend to contain useful, human-readable information about what you're reading, those requests can be quite informative.

For example, looking at a CDC page about genital herpes triggers a request to addthis.com like this:

GET /js/300/addthis_widget.js HTTP/1.1
Host: s7.addthis.com

Referer: http://www.cdc.gov/std/Herpes/default.htm

The fact that embedded code gets URL data like this isn't new - it's part of how the web is designed and, like it or not, some third parties actually rely on it - Twitter uses it to power its Tailored Suggestions feature for example.

What's new, or perhaps what's changed, is that we're becoming more sensitive to the amount of data we all leak about ourselves and, of course, health data is among the most sensitive.

While a single data point such as one visit to one web page on the CDC site doesn't amount to much, the fact is we're parting with a lot of data and sharing it with the same handful of marketing companies.

We do an awful lot of healthcare research online and we tend to concentrate those visits around popular sites.

A 2012 survey by the Pew Research Center found that 72% of internet users say they looked online for health information within the past year. A fact that explains why one of the sites mentioned in the study, WebMD.com, is the 106th most popular website in the USA and ranked 325th in the world.

The study describes the data we share as follows:

...91 percent of health-related web pages initiate HTTP requests to third-parties.  Seventy percent of these requests include information about specific symptoms, treatment, or diseases (AIDS, Cancer, etc.). The vast majority of these requests go to a handful of online advertisers: Google collects user information from 78 percent of pages, comScore 38 percent, and Facebook 31 percent.  Two data brokers, Experian and Acxiom, were also found on thousands of pages.

If we assume that it's possible to imply an individual's recent medical history from the healthcare pages they've browsed over a number of years then, taken together, those innocuous individual page views add up to something very sensitive.

As the study's author puts it:

Personal health information ... has suddenly become the property of private corporations who may sell it to the highest bidder or accidentally misuse it to discriminate against the ill.

There is no indication or suggestion that the companies Limbert named are using the health data we're sharing but they are at least being made unwitting custodians of it and that carries some serious responsibilities.

Although there is nothing in the leaked data that identifies our names or identities, it's quite possible that the companies we're leaking our health data to have them already.

Even if they don't though, we're not in the clear.

Even if Google, Facebook, AddThis, Experian and all the others are at pains to anonymise our data, I wouldn't bet against individuals being identified in stolen or leaked data.

It's surprisingly easy to identify named individuals within data sets that have been deliberately anonymised.

For example, somebody with access to my browsing history could see that I regularly visit Naked Security for long periods of time and that those long periods tend to happen immediately prior to the appearance of articles written by Mark Stockley.

For a longer and more detailed look at this phenomenon, take a look at Paul Ducklin's excellent article 'Just how anonymous are "anonymous" records?'

It's possible to stop this kind of data leak by setting up your browser so it doesn't send referer headers but I wouldn't rely on that because there are other ways to leak data to third parties.

Instead I suggest you use browser plugins like NoScript, Ghostery or the EFF's own Privacy Badger to control which third party sites you have any interaction with at all.

What the study hints at is bigger than that though - what it highlights is that we live in the era of Big Data and we're only just beginning to understand some of the very big implications of small problems that have been under our noses for years.

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Lava Kafle's insight:

#DidYouKnowThis #HealthCare #Cyber #Security #threats #leaks #vulnerabilities #Mitigation #strategy @deerwalkinc #bigdata #thirdparty

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Lava Prasad Kafle's curator insight, March 23, 2015 1:15 AM

@deerwalkinc

Instead I suggest you use browser plugins like NoScript, Ghostery or the EFF's own Privacy Badger to control which third party sites you have any interaction with at all.

What the study hints at is bigger than that though - what it highlights is that we live in the era of Big Data and we're only just beginning to understand some of the very big implications of small problems that have been under our noses for years.

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When Doctors Need Advice, It Might Not Come From A Fellow Human

When Doctors Need Advice, It Might Not Come From A Fellow Human | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
At hospitals and clinics around the country, physicians are tapping artificial intelligence systems for warnings and recommendations.
Lava Kafle's insight:

@deerwalkinc #doctors #physicians #advice #AI #NLP #ML #hospitals #clinics #artificial intelligence #machinelearning #naturallanguageprocessing 

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How Health Information Exchange Models Impact Data Analytics

How Health Information Exchange Models Impact Data Analytics | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
How are health information exchange models structured? How can providers use them for data analytics and population health management?
Lava Kafle's insight:

@deerwalkinc #HIE

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What Factors Encourage Physician HIE Adoption, Use? | EHRintelligence.com

What Factors Encourage Physician HIE Adoption, Use? | EHRintelligence.com | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
Physician HIE adoption hinges on the ability of health information exchanges (HIE) to deliver trusted data as well as deliver a return on investment.

Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Lava Kafle's insight:

Deerwalk #DidYouKnow #Physician #HIE Health #Information #Exchange #Adoption 

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Designers sought for Health Information Exchange (HIE) platform vendor at CareEvolution

Designers sought for Health Information Exchange (HIE) platform vendor at CareEvolution | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
Note: this job is open to US Residents only. Foreign nationals can apply but only if you live within the US. - What we do actually matters. CareEvolution's…
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Cigna to Purchase New Jersey-based QualCare Alliance Networks, Inc. - Insurance News Net

Cigna has entered into an agreement to purchase New Jersey- based QualCare Alliance Networks.
Lava Kafle's insight:

@deerwalkinc Cigna is buying QualCareAllianceNetworks healthcare investing capital venture 

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Palomar Health to implement full suite of Kaufman Hall budgeting, cost ... - Healthcare Finance News

Palomar Health to implement full suite of Kaufman Hall budgeting, cost ... - Healthcare Finance News | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
Kaufman Hall, a leading provider of strategic, capital and financial advisory services and software tools to healthcare organizations, today announced that San Diego-based healthcare system, Palomar Health, will implement its complete performance...
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@deerwalkinc Palomar Health Implement healthcare 

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Aetna Selects HealthEdge Technology to Help Enable the Next Generation of ... - Insurance News Net

HealthEdge ®, provider of the only integrated financial, administrative and clinical platform for healthcare payors, today announced that the HealthRules ® product suite was selected by leading diversified healthcare benefits company Aetna to...
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@deerwalkinc @aetna #health #edge #care #payors #insurance #rules #HealthRules 

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How nine out of ten healthcare pages leak private data

A study by a Timothy Libert, a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania, has found that nine out of ten visitsto health-related web pages result in data being leaked to third parties like Google, Facebook and Experian:

There is a significant risk to your privacy whenever you visit a health-related web page. An analysis of over 80,000 such web pages shows that nine out of ten visits result in personal health information being leaked to third parties, including online advertisers and data brokers.

What Libert discovered is a widespread repetition of the flaw that the US government's flagship Healthcare.gov website was dragged over the coals for in January.

The sites in question use code from third parties to provide things like advertising, web analytics and social media sharing widgets on their pages. Because of the way those kinds of widgets work, their third party owners can see what pages you're visiting.

The companies supplying the code aren't necessarily seeking information about what you're looking at but they're getting it whether they want it or not.

So if you browse the pages about genital herpes on the highly respected CDC (Centres for Disease Control and Prevention) site you'll also be telling marketing mega-companies Twitter, Facebook and AddThis that you've an interest in genital herpes too.

It happens like this: when your browser fetches a web page, it also fetches any third party code embedded in it directly from the third parties' websites. The requests sent by your browser contain an HTTP header (the annoyingly misspelled 'referer' header) that includes the URL of the page you're looking at.

Since URLs tend to contain useful, human-readable information about what you're reading, those requests can be quite informative.

For example, looking at a CDC page about genital herpes triggers a request to addthis.com like this:

GET /js/300/addthis_widget.js HTTP/1.1
Host: s7.addthis.com

Referer: http://www.cdc.gov/std/Herpes/default.htm

The fact that embedded code gets URL data like this isn't new - it's part of how the web is designed and, like it or not, some third parties actually rely on it - Twitter uses it to power its Tailored Suggestions feature for example.

What's new, or perhaps what's changed, is that we're becoming more sensitive to the amount of data we all leak about ourselves and, of course, health data is among the most sensitive.

While a single data point such as one visit to one web page on the CDC site doesn't amount to much, the fact is we're parting with a lot of data and sharing it with the same handful of marketing companies.

We do an awful lot of healthcare research online and we tend to concentrate those visits around popular sites.

A 2012 survey by the Pew Research Center found that 72% of internet users say they looked online for health information within the past year. A fact that explains why one of the sites mentioned in the study, WebMD.com, is the 106th most popular website in the USA and ranked 325th in the world.

The study describes the data we share as follows:

...91 percent of health-related web pages initiate HTTP requests to third-parties.  Seventy percent of these requests include information about specific symptoms, treatment, or diseases (AIDS, Cancer, etc.). The vast majority of these requests go to a handful of online advertisers: Google collects user information from 78 percent of pages, comScore 38 percent, and Facebook 31 percent.  Two data brokers, Experian and Acxiom, were also found on thousands of pages.

If we assume that it's possible to imply an individual's recent medical history from the healthcare pages they've browsed over a number of years then, taken together, those innocuous individual page views add up to something very sensitive.

As the study's author puts it:

Personal health information ... has suddenly become the property of private corporations who may sell it to the highest bidder or accidentally misuse it to discriminate against the ill.

There is no indication or suggestion that the companies Limbert named are using the health data we're sharing but they are at least being made unwitting custodians of it and that carries some serious responsibilities.

Although there is nothing in the leaked data that identifies our names or identities, it's quite possible that the companies we're leaking our health data to have them already.

Even if they don't though, we're not in the clear.

Even if Google, Facebook, AddThis, Experian and all the others are at pains to anonymise our data, I wouldn't bet against individuals being identified in stolen or leaked data.

It's surprisingly easy to identify named individuals within data sets that have been deliberately anonymised.

For example, somebody with access to my browsing history could see that I regularly visit Naked Security for long periods of time and that those long periods tend to happen immediately prior to the appearance of articles written by Mark Stockley.

For a longer and more detailed look at this phenomenon, take a look at Paul Ducklin's excellent article 'Just how anonymous are "anonymous" records?'

It's possible to stop this kind of data leak by setting up your browser so it doesn't send referer headers but I wouldn't rely on that because there are other ways to leak data to third parties.

Instead I suggest you use browser plugins like NoScript, Ghostery or the EFF's own Privacy Badger to control which third party sites you have any interaction with at all.

What the study hints at is bigger than that though - what it highlights is that we live in the era of Big Data and we're only just beginning to understand some of the very big implications of small problems that have been under our noses for years.

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc., Lava Kafle
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Lava Kafle's curator insight, March 3, 2015 5:40 AM

#DidYouKnowThis #HealthCare #Cyber #Security #threats #leaks #vulnerabilities #Mitigation #strategy @deerwalkinc #bigdata #thirdparty

Lava Prasad Kafle's curator insight, March 23, 2015 1:15 AM

@deerwalkinc

Instead I suggest you use browser plugins like NoScript, Ghostery or the EFF's own Privacy Badger to control which third party sites you have any interaction with at all.

What the study hints at is bigger than that though - what it highlights is that we live in the era of Big Data and we're only just beginning to understand some of the very big implications of small problems that have been under our noses for years.

Scooped by Lava Kafle
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How EHRs Will Produce Big Benefits in the Long Run

How EHRs Will Produce Big Benefits in the Long Run | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
Eugene Heslin discusses how transitioning to electronic health records may be difficult at first, but they will produce big benefits in the long run.
Lava Kafle's insight:

#Genomics team #deerwalk.com inc #uknow #easter eggs sunday 2015 healthcare.adsc.com Eugene Heslin discusses how transitioning to electronic health records may be difficult at first, but they will produce big benefits in the long run.

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Orion Health and Greenway Health Partner to Deliver EHR Solution for Public ... - SYS-CON Media (press release)

Orion Health and Greenway Health Partner to Deliver EHR Solution for Public ... - SYS-CON Media (press release) | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
SYS-CON Media, NJ, The world's leading i-technology media company on breaking technology news.
Lava Kafle's insight:

@deerwalkinc #DidYouKnow OrionHealth GreenwayHealth EHR partnership solutions 

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Hospital Use of Electronic Health Records on the Rise, CDC Says

Hospital Use of Electronic Health Records on the Rise, CDC Says | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
The number of hospital emergency departments using electronic health records rose from 46 percent in 2006 to 84 percent in 2011, according to a new analysis by the National Center on Health Statist...
Lava Kafle's insight:

@deerwalkinc #EHR hospital use #Electronic #Health #Records 

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GAO: Veterans' health care costs a 'high risk' for taxpayers - Lynchburg News and Advance

GAO: Veterans' health care costs a 'high risk' for taxpayers - Lynchburg News and Advance | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (AP) — Veterans' health care is a "high risk" budget issue that threatens to cost taxpayers tens of billions of dollars unless longstanding problems are addressed, government auditors warned Wednesday.
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Patient Monitoring Market To Exceed 5 Billion By 2020

Patient Monitoring Market To Exceed 5 Billion By 2020 | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it

An iData Research survey has projected the patient monitoring market will exceed $5 billion by 2020 as a result of double-digit growth over the next five years in the telehealth market. The study also predicts that telehealth for disease conditions management will comprise more than 50 percent of the total telehealth market, driven by increased chronic illness in an aging population, increasing demand for customized healthcare solutions, and financial pressures due to overburdened healthcare budgets.

“The goal of telehealth is to prevent hospital readmission, reduce in-office visits, better manage health of individuals with long term conditions and reduce costs for more remote and isolated health care providers,” Dr. Zamanian, CEO of iData explained.

Market growth is anticipated to be “further bolstered as awareness and implementation of standards for reimbursement and adoption of this type of care management increase,” according to iData, as public and private organizations each are expected to increase funding for telehealth expenditures as a fiscally responsible and efficient solution.

As Health IT Outcomes reported, there are three major hurdles for telehealth adoption including reimbursement, federal standards, and licensure. A policy report from ML Strategies explains, “Current federal law is extremely restrictive on how telehealth is paid for – resulting in a disincentive to provider adoption.” Restrictions only allow reimbursements for patients who receive virtual care at rural clinics and not in metropolitan areas.

However, some progress is being made in the area of telehealth reimbursement. For example, Governor Andrew Cuomo recently signed into law legislation that would require Medicaid to reimburse for telehealth service costs in New York. And in November, CMS issued a final rule updating physician fee schedules and boosting payments for telehealth services. This trend indicates there is growing recognition of the cost effectiveness and success of telehealth services in overall patient care and outcomes.

Other barriers still remain, including the fact that no federal telehealth standards are in place with each state having its own regulations. As ML Strategies explains, “Currently, there is no federal standard of clinical guidelines for telehealth,” creating a “patchwork of state laws that inhibit the proliferation of telehealth solutions in both the public and private sectors.” As telehealth grows in popularity, however, federal regulations will become necessary in order to guarantee consistency.

The final barrier to telehealth growth, according to the ML Strategies report, is licensure, as it raises issues of flexibility if a patient wishes to consult a telehealth provider across state lines. “With the advent of telehealth, licensing of health providers must be updated to reflect the flexibility provided by telehealth – allowing healthcare experts to bring their expertise virtually to where it is needed, even across state borders,” notes the report.

Nevertheless, despite the obstacles, the telehealth industry is set for unprecedented growth by 2020 as iData Research has asserted. According to a survey of senior healthcare executives released by law firm Foley & Lardner, “The reimbursement landscape is already changing, and there are many viable options for getting compensated for practicing telemedicine,” said Larry Vernaglia, chair of Foley’s Health Care Practice. “The smartest thing organizations can do now is to continue developing programs, and be ready for the law to catch up – because it will.”

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Lava Kafle's insight:

@deerwalkinc 

Patient Monitoring Market To Exceed 5 Billion By 2020 
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Data-driven health care

The Health Care Forum 2013, Boston We are in the midst of the most transformative time for health care in our nation's history. In the setting of an expandin...
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@deerwalkinc DataDrivenHealthcareBig boston 

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Remedies for lowering drug prices: From mild to aggressive - Philly.com (blog)

Remedies for lowering drug prices: From mild to aggressive - Philly.com (blog) | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
At last the mass media have turned their attention to the reality of excessively high drug prices in the U.S.
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@deerwalkinc bigpharma lowering drug prices bigdata healthcare 

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The Best in KLAS Health IT Products for 2014 - Health Data Management

The Best in KLAS Health IT Products for 2014 - Health Data Management | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
Vendor research firm KLAS Enterprises has released its annual Best in KLAS Awards: Software and Services Report, a ranking of the best performing health I.T.
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'911 dispatcher uses Facebook to find injured hiker in Calif.'

'911 dispatcher uses Facebook to find injured hiker in Calif.' | #PopulationManagementPortal #BigDataHealthCareReporting | Scoop.it
LAKE BERRYESSA, Calif. (AP) — Officials say a 911 dispatcher in training used Facebook to locate a Northern California hiker critically injured after falling a 150 feet down a cliff

Via #BBBundyBlog #NOMORELIES Tom Woods #Activist Award #Scoopiteer >20,000 Sources >250K Connections http://goo.gl/ruHO3Q
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