Police Problems and Policy
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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Portland Leadership Consulting With Black Lives Matter On Police Contract

Portland Leadership Consulting With Black Lives Matter On Police Contract | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Staff for Portland Commissioners Jo Ann Hardesty and Chloe Eudaly met Thursday with national Black Lives Matter activist DeRay Mckesson to strategize over the city labor contract with the Portland police officers’ union, an official in Hardesty’s office said.

According to Oregon Live, Mckesson, 33, met with the officials as part of his work managing Campaign Zero, a group that reviews police union contracts nationwide and points out what it says are policies that shield officers from accountability for misconduct.

Campaign Zero’s analysis of the Portland police contract pointed to what the group says is problematic language that restricts questioning of officers, gives officers undue access to information about investigations of which they are targets, and limits officer discipline and record keeping of misconduct.

Daryl Turner, the police union president, declined to comment.

The official in Hardesty’s office said Mckesson gave “a detailed presentation about policing, contracts, accountability and their relationship to violence.”

Also present at the meeting were members of the Albina Ministerial Alliance Coalition for Justice and Police Reform, a faith-based group seeking greater police oversight.
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Have fatal shootings by police in California dropped 40 percent since 2015?

Have fatal shootings by police in California dropped 40 percent since 2015? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
But in the midst of the calls for reform, are fatal police shootings actually on the decline in the state?  

That’s the contention by Protect California, a nonprofit law enforcement-backed group that supports SB 230. The group has produced ads in support of that bill, including one airing on television in Sacramento. 

Here’s what Protect California claimed in a recent online video:  

"Heard the ACLU talk about California’s epidemic of police violence? It’s not true. Fatalities in officer-involved shootings have actually decreased 40 percent in California since 2015."

Describing police violence as "an epidemic" is subjective, but we’ll examine the claim about a 40 percent decrease in our analysis below.

Our research

Tom Saggau, a spokesman for Protect California, said his group used data from Fatal Force, The Washington Post’s grim tally of people shot and killed by police across America each year.

There are other resources, including figures from the FBI and U.S. Centers for Disease Control. But as the Post reported, federal officials "acknowledge that their data is incomplete. Since 2015, the newspaper has documented more than twice as many fatal shootings by police as recorded on average annually."

Data from Fatal Force show there have been nearly 1,000 people shot and killed by police each year since 2015 across the United States.

Looking at California, the database shows the number of people shot and killed by police dropped from 190 in 2015 to 115 last year. That matches with the group’s claim of a 40 percent decline "since 2015. Saggau attributed that decline to the introduction of de-escalation training at some police agencies across the state. 

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Audit Finds LAPD Predictive Policing Programs Lack Oversight

Audit Finds LAPD Predictive Policing Programs Lack Oversight | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Data-driven policing strategies and artificial intelligence-driven technologies utilized by the Los Angeles Police Department lacked oversight in their implementation and often strayed from their stated goals, an internal audit found Friday.

Some of the largest law enforcement agencies in the country use so-called predictive policing programs and technologies to forecast where and when crime will occur in their communities.

Those technologies, while seen by police as objective tools, have come under scrutiny by advocates who claim the tools disproportionately target those who are low-income or people of color and that they collect data on individuals without consent.
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George Strait Tributes Police With New ‘The Weight of the Badge'

George Strait Tributes Police With New ‘The Weight of the Badge' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
George Strait tips his hat to policemen and women on his reflective new song The Weight of the Badge.
Rob Duke's insight:

With all the bad that gets said: this is what it's like.  Service and honor.

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Re-Hired Sheriff's Deputy Re-Terminated by LA County Executive

Re-Hired Sheriff's Deputy Re-Terminated by LA County Executive | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A former Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department deputy fired after a domestic violence complaint -- then rehired by Sheriff Alex Villanueva -- was ordered to turn in his badge and gun by the county'
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LA County Officers Claim Abuse by 'Sheriff's Gang'

LA County Officers Claim Abuse by 'Sheriff's Gang' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

In claims filed with Los Angeles County on Thursday, a group of Latino officers say a street gang within the ranks of the LA County Sheriff’s Department assaulted them and continues to operate a clique that intimidates and harasses anyone who speaks up about their actions.

The claims describe a mentality similar to the gangs law enforcement contend with in the field, but these individuals work in the sheriff’s department. The officers say superiors have done little to dissuade the actions of the “Banditos” gang.

The matter came to a head this past September, when the officers say several members of the gang assaulted them after a department party.

Attorney Vincent Miller, who filed the officers’ claims with the county Thursday, said the department has been aware of the gang culture for years. He noted a similar lawsuit filed in 2014, in which a female deputy said she was bullied and harassed by the “Banditos.” She settled out of court for $1.5 million.

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Stephon Clark's mother speaks out after protests: 'Do what you got to do'

Stephon Clark's mother speaks out after protests: 'Do what you got to do' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
After California's attorney general announced that he won't charge two police officers in the death of Stephon Clark, his mother said she can understand why people are angry.
Rob Duke's insight:

That's what Mayor Tom Bradley said after the Rodney King verdict and it seemed to throw fuel on the fire that became the L.A. Riots.  Death and destruction followed without much meaningful change.  This system changes slowly, but it prevents the chaos and destruction that always follows a loss of civil society.

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These journalists have a list of criminal cops. California is trying to keep it secret.

These journalists have a list of criminal cops. California is trying to keep it secret. | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Law enforcement claims it’s illegal for two journalists to possess documents voluntarily handed to them in response to a public records request.
Rob Duke's insight:

They need to publish the list.  The public has a right to know.  Most of those people will not still be officers. 

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eamoe's comment, March 17, 7:20 PM
It seems they have had criminals in government for some time. I don't know for how long, but sunlight is the best disinfectant for this. I think if the USA takes the lead in exposure of the criminality in government, it will have a rippling effect globally, as other nations will do the same. It has been fashionable to be a high functioning criminal, and it has really just hurt humanity, not helped. It might have helped the one participating in it, but when their 'end time' comes, I have heard they suffer tremendously for what they did when they were young.
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Sacramento DA reveals personal details about Stephon Clark | The Sacramento Bee

Sacramento DA reveals personal details about Stephon Clark | The Sacramento Bee | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
She brought up his history with domestic violence, and talked about the drugs found in his body after he was shot to death by police.

She raised the despair Stephon Clark was facing the weekend before he died, his fear of going back to jail and not seeing his children again and the intensely personal disputes with his girlfriend as he researched methods of suicide online.


In explaining Saturday why she was not filing criminal charges against the police officers who killed Clark last March, Sacramento District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert tried to tiptoe around the edges of the couple’s troubles, but eventually acknowledged that they played into her final decision.

“You can see that there were many things weighing heavily on his mind,” Schubert said in a riveting 80-minute news conference. “It is clear that they had a very tumultuous relationship.”
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Ford's 2020 Explorer for police has hidden lifesaving design feature | Business | syvnews.com

Ford's 2020 Explorer for police has hidden lifesaving design feature | Business | syvnews.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Michigan State Police 1st Lt. Mike Shaw has been nearly hit by speeding vehicles four times, twice while outside his car. "And four times is actually low. I know a
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Judge bars immigration policing criteria for 2 grants | PBS NewsHour Weekend

Judge bars immigration policing criteria for 2 grants | PBS NewsHour Weekend | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A federal judge on Friday permanently blocked the Trump administration from imposing conditions that police departments cooperate with immigration authorities to receive law enforcement grants.
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Shooting Death of a Teenager in Brooklyn Comes Amid Rise in Murders

Shooting Death of a Teenager in Brooklyn Comes Amid Rise in Murders | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A 15-year-old boy from Haiti was shot and killed in front of his sister by a hooded gunman on Friday night in a horrific scene that rocked his Brooklyn neighborhood and served as a grim reminder of a growing number of murders in New York.
Rob Duke's insight:

NY has begun its descent back into the bad ol' days of the 1980's when it was the model for Gotham City.  The attack on the police and the use of COMPstat to target the areas that the computer showed were the most at risk has caused a de-policing where the cops sit on their hands and wear blinders.  The police must have clear objectives; and, if not, then rule of law and accountability are not the first order.  Instead, law and order on the street are controlled by the unregulated forces that control the underground economy.  When the gang is out of control and overbearing, do they have an internal affairs? No.  Might makes right.

For me, I'd rather have the officers who will lay down their lives, but will also lay down their shield whenever we relieve them of power.  Try that with a gang member: turn in your dew rage, escallade, and gun--you're a disgrace and out of the gang...not hardly.

*End of rant*

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America’s cops take an interest in social media - Social media

America’s cops take an interest in social media - Social media | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Should the police monitor social media? The question seems to have an obvious answer. Social media, says Joe Giacalone, a retired New York Police Department detective who now teaches at John Jay College, is “a treasure trove for investigators. People post stuff they shouldn’t…vehicles, weapons, you name it. If you’re dumb enough to post something on social media and you’re wanted for a crime, you deserve to get caught.” In this sense, social media is no different from any other public space. If criminals brag about or plot their exploits publicly online, police should be able to use that information without obtaining a warrant, just as if they overheard chatter in a bar or on a street corner.

But there is a difference between an individual officer looking at posts from someone suspected or accused of a specific crime, and the sort of mass monitoring made possible by data-scraping and automated surveillance. There is also a difference between looking for evidence of criminal activity and monitoring politically unpopular, but still legally protected, speech. Records obtained by the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California (aclu-nc) revealed that in 2015 a police department in Fresno used a social-media monitoring firm that boasted it could “avoid the warrant process when identifying social-media accounts for particular individuals,” and could “identify threats to public safety” by monitoring terms including “policebrutality”, “wewantjustice”, “Dissent” and “Blacklivesmatter”. Other law-enforcement agencies in California used a similar service whose marketing materials referred to “unions [and] activist groups” as “overt threats”.

Nor is such monitoring limited to state and local police forces. Immigration and Customs Enforcement hoovers up vast amounts of information, including from social-media posts. On January 17th the aclu-nc sued seven federal agencies that failed to respond properly to Freedom of Information Act requests about their social-media surveillance. The only agency that responded at all was the fbi, which could “neither confirm nor deny the existence of records”.

While some might applaud the fbi for tracking threats online, others recall its Cointelpro initiative, which lasted from 1956 to 1971 and involved surveillance and infiltration of groups the agency deemed subversive, including civil-rights organisations. In 2017 an fbi report warned of terror threats from a “Black Identity Extremist” movement; some fear that police agencies will once again subject activists to disproportionate and extra-legal scrutiny, and in so doing chill protected speech and rights of association.

As in other debates over the surveillance of public spaces, targeting, scale and cost all matter. Few people would object to police tracking known or even suspected criminals online; more would agree with Matt Cagle, the aclu-nc’s technology and civil-liberties lawyer, that “government should not be conducting suspicionless surveillance of First Amendment-protected activity.” Similarly, most people probably understand that their social-media posts are public (to varying extents, depending on how they use their privacy settings). They might be uncomfortable if they knew that the government could, without a warrant, collect and search everything they have ever posted.

Although police can follow someone in public without a warrant, doing so means that an officer thinks it worth his time. Data-mining programs make it possible to track millions of people online with minimal effort. Technology, says Rachel Levinson-Waldman, senior counsel to the Brennan Centre’s Liberty and National Security Programme, “enables a much more significant level of surveillance at a much lower cost”. As people live more of their lives online, surveillance will inevitably follow. Americans must decide how much of it they are willing to tolerate.

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Downey Police Union Seeks To Destroy Officer Records

Downey Police Union Seeks To Destroy Officer Records | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Since a new law cleared the way for the release of long secret police records, unions representing officers around the state have filed a flurry of lawsuits to prevent those records from seeing the light of day.

The Downey Police Officer's Association has taken an aggressive strategy: it petitioned a court to demand Downey destroy records older than five years. The officer's union argues doing so would be in keeping with the city's five-year retention schedule.

At the request of the union, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Lori Ann Fournier issued a temporary restraining order Thursday to block the release of records until the matter can be more fully considered by the court.

The litigation stems from recent legislation, SB 1421, that gives the public access to investigations into officer use of force and shootings, as well as findings of lying and sexual assault.

'ABSOLUTELY NEFARIOUS'

"It is absolutely nefarious that the officers in that city have asked for a court order to destroy information that could shed light on the bad behavior of law enforcement officers," said Jim Ewert, the general counsel for the California News Publishers Association.

"I've never seen this before," said Ewert, who is an advocate for open records.

In December, the City of Inglewood destroyed years worth of investigative records that would have become public under SB 1421.
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Robert Kraft case shows how police use hidden cameras to get evidence

Robert Kraft case shows how police use hidden cameras to get evidence | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The video is in color and explicit.

It shows hours and hours of male customers having sex with masseuses inside a South Florida massage parlor. Police installed hidden cameras inside the business to capture prostitution on tape.

And the police action is legal.

The footage, obtained by CNBC, is from a 2015 South Florida massage parlor investigation where police installed hidden cameras after hiring a locksmith to get inside the business in order to capture prostitution taking place in the rooms. The spa later shut down after police arrested dozens of customers. Police were able to install hidden cameras after obtaining a special warrant.
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Judge Unlikely to Exclude Commentary in Police Shooting Videos

Judge Unlikely to Exclude Commentary in Police Shooting Videos | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A federal judge said Monday he will likely let jurors hear a witness exclaim “that was unnecessary” after police officers fired dozens of rounds at a 26-year-old man on video, despite the city of San Francisco’s objections.

“Do the statements on the videos qualify as excited utterances,” U.S. District Judge William Orrick III asked during a pretrial conference Monday.
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Black drivers in America face discrimination by the police - Daily chart

Black drivers in America face discrimination by the police - Daily chart | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

BLACK MOTORISTS have long complained that American police officers tend to target them for traffic stops. A study by the Justice Department, published in 2013, found that black drivers were 31% more likely to be pulled over than white ones; other interactions with law enforcement are characterised by similar racial imbalances.

Such figures do not by themselves prove that bias is to blame. It is hard to distinguish how much of this imbalance can be attributed to race-specific differences in driving behaviours—such as adherence to traffic laws or the amount of time spent on roads in areas where police are present—and how much is driven by racial profiling. But new research suggests that discrimination is at least part of the problem.

A study released this week by researchers from Stanford University and New York University finds “widespread discrimination” in police officers’ decisions to stop and search drivers. The authors used data from nearly 100m traffic stops carried out by state and municipal police departments across America between 2011 and 2017. They find that blacks are about 38% more likely to be pulled over by state patrol officers than white drivers. For local officers, the figure is 35%.

At least some of this gap can be attributed to racial bias. Using a “veil of darkness” test, the authors show that black drivers account for a significantly higher share of traffic stops during the day, when it is easier for an officer to determine a driver’s race, than they do at night, when a driver’s skin colour is harder to ascertain (see chart). The variation in sunset times during the year, three of which are shown in the panels above, allow the researchers to control for other factors such as when the most police officers are on patrol.

State and local lawmakers can help combat such discrimination by gathering and analysing information on it. In 1999, North Carolina became the first state in America to require police agencies to collect and report data on traffic stops. Other states, including Connecticut and California, have followed, but some do not yet do so. The authors of the study argue that such data-collection efforts will help police officers to do their jobs better. “Collecting, releasing, and analysing police data are essential steps for increasing the effectiveness and equity of law-enforcement practices,” the authors write, “and for improving relations with the public.”

Rob Duke's insight:

Interesting new study.  I can't speak for state police as they have a different job; specifically, controlling traffic on highways.  But, street cops who are primarily charged with controlling deviance and maintaining order, are usually problem driven.  In other words, you patrol where the crime draws you to--no crime, then usually little police activity.  That means that the police tend to be focused on whatever race happens to be poor and involved in the underground economy.  When these officers have been studied using a "daylight savings time" methodology, we haven't seen a statistical difference in who they pull over, whether it's light enough out to see who's in the car before the stop or not.

 

See, for instance:

Grogger, J., & Ridgeway, G. (2006). Testing for Racial Profiling in Traffic Stops from behind a Veil of Darkness. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 101(475), 878-887. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/27590768

 

Having said that, if don't stop using the Whren v. U.S. (1995), (which allowed using minor violations as pretext to make an investigative stop), we're going to lose it.  My guess is that the courts are just looking for a case with the "right" facts now to change this rule.

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Rob Duke's comment, March 17, 7:48 PM
Little things help. For instance; 1. use legitimate probable cause; 2. be honest. So, I'd say, "Hi, how are you folks tonight?" If there was a woman in the car, I'd say: "Good evening, ma'am." before going further. Then I'd say: "I stopped you tonight because:_______". If it was speeding, running a stop sign, then I'd ask: "Do you have any lawful reason for doing so? heading to the hospital, etc.?" Then, I'd admit it if I was also looking at the car for a specific reason: "I notice your trunk lock is missing, sometimes that indicates the car had been stolen in the past or might be stolen now. Now that I see you folks, I no longer think it's stolen, but I wouldn't be doing my job if I didn't ask to see your registration--just to make sure--I'd hate to let someone go and then 30 minutes later have to explain to the car owner how I made a mistake." "I have to go back to my car to use the computer--the dispatchers are so busy that they appreciate when I run my own plates and drivers licenses. But, as soon as I verify there are no problems, I'll have you on your way, alright? Any questions?" Then when I return, I say: "Ok, sir/ma'am everything looks good. Is there anything I can do for you before you're on your way? My name is:______; and my badge no is:_____ and I'm assigned to central station should you need to get ahold of me. Thanks for you time. Be careful pulling out and have a nice day/night." Almost always, I found that my behavior was mirrored back by the occupants--even if I wrote the ticket.
eamoe's comment, March 17, 8:01 PM
How do I send my comments to a word document? I bought a new Acer Chromebook 15 and it has google but I can't seem to be able to load, except to send a email link to the article, not the specific comment. Shrug?
Rob Duke's comment, March 17, 9:20 PM
Just cut/past, I guess. Since you're using your own name, just type in something like "I claim my points".
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Stephon Clark: Prosecution of police officers is rare | The Sacramento Bee

Sacramento County District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert’s decision not to prosecute two police officers for shooting Stephon Clark didn’t surprise experts on use of force laws.
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Probationary officers fired after running off during officer-involved shooting

Probationary officers fired after running off during officer-involved shooting | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police Chief William McManus said the two probationary officers were accompanying Sergeant Steven Castillo when he was called early Monday morning to check out a disturbance at a home on Spring Dale Street. A probationary officer is a rookie officer, one who just got out of academy a year or less.

The parents of the suspect, identified as Daniel Moncada, called 911 to help get their son under control. Castillo arrived with the probationary officers and confronted Moncada in a bedroom.


Detectives said Moncada fired a shotgun toward Castillo; he returned fire, killing Moncada. Sources later claimed the two probationary officers ran off during the gunfire. McManus called it an "unavoidable shooting."

The two unidentified officers were fired for their actions, McManus said, but they will not face any criminal charges.

“I felt it best that these two officers need to look for another profession,” McManus said.
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Legal experts analyze lack of charges in bar brawl between Pittsburgh police, Pagans

Legal experts analyze lack of charges in bar brawl between Pittsburgh police, Pagans | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
“The part that is most likely to be unlawful is the repeated punching of one civilian on the bar who cannot resist. It is hard to see how that is not criminal,” said William Snyder, a Syracuse University law professor and former assistant to the U.S. attorney general who spent 13 years as a federal prosecutor in Pittsburgh.
Rob Duke's insight:

First observation:  The cops are working.  They are set up as if they're waiting for something.  If they were there to party, then they' d be together--playing darts, etc.  It appears that they suspect something's going to go down.

Second observation: the cops are talking.  It's the Pagan that attacks.

Third observation: the guy being held is actively trying to pull his arms to his chest.  This creates a problem for the officers because: a. he's not complying; and, b. weapons are kept at the belt, under the arm and in pockets.

Having said all this: the cops could have stepped back and allowed the deputies in uniform to deploy a non-lethal like the Taser.  This contains a risk, however, if the guy is armed and goes for a weapon while he has freedom of movement.

p.s. Many cops don't like pepper spray because of the indiscriminate properties where you can never spray just one person, but end up spraying nearly everyone in the vicinity.

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Officers In Stephon Clark Shooting Won't Be Charged, Says Sacramento D.A. : NPR

Officers In Stephon Clark Shooting Won't Be Charged, Says Sacramento D.A. : NPR | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Nearly a year after Sacramento police fatally shot Stephon Clark, a 22-year-old unarmed black man who died in his grandmother's backyard, District Attorney Anne-Marie Schubert announced on Saturday that the two officers who killed him will not face criminal charges.

In a news conference that lasted more than an hour, the district attorney walked the public through evidence gathered by investigators and discussed the law that governs when police officers are justified in using deadly force.

"The law requires that we judge the reasonableness of an officer's actions based upon the circumstances confronting them at that moment of time," Schubert began, speaking to a packed room of reporters inside a building across the street from her office's headquarters.

In the end, she said, it was clear that Sacramento police officers Jared Robinet and Terrence Mercadal did not commit a crime.

"We know [Clark] fled from the officers after being told to stop, we know that he continued into the backyard, and we know that when he continued into the backyard, he rounded that corner, and he went to the end of that yard and he turned around," said Schubert, describing the moments leading up to the fatal shooting. "He didn't continue to flee. He turned around and he was in a shooting stance with his arms extended."

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The DA said the two officers "honestly, without hesitation, believed he had a gun" before they fired 20 shots at Clark, hitting him at least seven times.

Clark was killed March 18 after Sacramento police responded to a 911 call of a man breaking car windows in the South Sacramento neighborhood of Meadowview. During Saturday's press conference, Schubert said DNA evidence confirmed that Clark was the individual who broke the windows, and also smashed a home's sliding glass door with a cinder block.

Two officers arrived on the scene that night, searched outside a nearby residence and, after spotting Clark, eventually pursued him into a backyard — which they later learned was his grandmother's home — where they shot at him.

After the shooting, Robinet and Mercadal said they thought Clark had a gun, but they only found a cell phone at the scene.
Rob Duke's insight:

Evidently, Clark knew he was going back to jail from an earlier court appearance, fought with his girlfriend, and was researching online ways to commit suicide.

That's enough circumstantial evidence to suggest that this was a "suicide by cop".  So tragic and by no means does this let the social system off the hook for creating the circumstances that led to Clark's run-ins with the justice system, but these two officers can't be held criminally responsible for this tragedy.

Now, how does his death serve a higher purpose....that is the glaring question...?

A friend told me nothing changes until the police find their MLK--that's profound, but then I got a little depressed; because we get so trapped by our own bureaucracies that I'm fearful we won't ever be able to find our symbolic leader...our careers are held too closely by conformity and we retire way too soon....

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Your Lousy Parenting Makes Being A Cop A Nightmare

Your Lousy Parenting Makes Being A Cop A Nightmare | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Some will dismiss my rant about lousy parenting as being a grouchy old cop. Fair. Others see me as an American who wants his country back. To you - cheers.
Rob Duke's insight:

Too harsh, but I get his point.  It can be frustrating to be in this career and not feel like you ever get any "wins".

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California Prisoners Say Videos Show ‘Gladiator Fights’ At Soledad Facility

California Prisoners Say Videos Show ‘Gladiator Fights’ At Soledad Facility | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
California prisoners released video recordings of two prisoner fights they say were set-up by officials at the Correctional Training Facility in Soledad, California.
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eamoe's comment, March 17, 9:32 PM
Why don't they make it a wager game and win food, free time and other stuff? They are already a rat in a cage, it looks like they were poking a stick at the rats, and they turn on each other now. They need to be more focused on keeping them busy and not idle to get into these kind of situations. I mean it doesn't surprise me to hear this about prisons, but don't set up the ones in the cells. It just makes the rat in the cage madder.
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California man who spent 39 years in prison gets $21 million for wrongful conviction

California man who spent 39 years in prison gets $21 million for wrongful conviction | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it

Craig Coley, 71, was sentenced to life in prison without parole for the 1978 murder of his former partner, Rhonda Wicht, and her 4-year-old son, Donald, at their apartment. "While no amount of money can make up for what happened to Mr. Coley, settling this case is the right thing to do.

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Timeline: How Chicago Police Unraveled Jussie Smollett Case

Timeline: How Chicago Police Unraveled Jussie Smollett Case | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In the less than four weeks since "Empire" actor Jussie Smollett reported being attacked by two men in Chicago, police detectives followed the case from an alleged hate crime to an apparent staged incident.
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Leesy Lees's curator insight, February 23, 9:38 PM
If you know your staging a crime at least be smart enough not to call the other suspects off your personal cell phone.