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Why Hackers Love Healthcare Organizations

Why Hackers Love Healthcare Organizations | My PLN | Scoop.it

If you look at all the data breaches that took place in 2014, you might conclude that healthcare organizations have lax cybersecurity protocols. You’d be wrong, but it’s not hard to see how you might reach that conclusion. Last year, the healthcare sector reported more breaches—333 in all—than any other industry. Like any symptom viewed in isolation, diagnosing the real ailment in the healthcare industry requires a more thorough examination. Want to know why hackers are so intent on breaking into healthcare organizations’ systems—and so successful? Here are the top reasons:

 

Healthcare data is the most valuable data of all.


If a hacker goes through the trouble of infiltrating, say, an e-commerce vendor or a brick-and-mortar retailer, he’ll walk away with thousands or hundreds of thousands of credit card numbers. That’s no small haul, but credit card companies and consumers have learned to deal with breaches. Banks assign their customers new numbers, issue them new cards and promise to wipe any suspicious charges. By the time hackers can sell their stolen card data, much of it is useless.

 

Healthcare data, by contrast, gives criminals just about everything they need to steal identities, creating valuable goods to sell on the black market. A breach at a health insurance company, for example, could yield data ranging from bank account and Social Security numbers to medical history to family names and beyond. Think of all of the fraudulent accounts a criminal could open simply by getting ahold of a customer’s Social Security number, her address and her mother’s maiden name.

 

In an industry where everything is sensitive and regulated, workers resist additional controls.


Just like chief information security officers in other industries, CISOs working in healthcare evaluate their vulnerabilities and their priority technology upgrades on an ongoing basis. Because of healthcare information’s depth, deploying new technology can be complex, but selling users on that technology and its associated security protocols can be seriously challenging. A doctor who has to endure multiple controls just to  prescribe medication or complete another mundane task might understandably bristle when the security team introduces multi-factor authentication or some other process that he views as just another obstacle to doing his job.

 

Human beings—including medical providers—are fallible, and hackers know it.


When my wife was in the hospital for the birth of our daughter, I noticed something during every nursing shift. The staff left patient folders open on the front desk. There was ample security to protect newborns themselves, but not to protect their data. Harried working conditions also contribute to the potential exposure of digital data. If an over-tired doctor heads home after a 20-hour shift and forgets his laptop in the taxi, that could be just the opening a criminal needs to access an entire healthcare system. Humans aren’t error proof, which is why the technology, particularly in healthcare, has to be.

 

A hacker only needs to be right once; the healthcare organization needs to be right all the time.


For every high-profile data breach affecting a healthcare organization during the past 18 months, there are experts ready to say, “They should have known better.” “They should have known laptops have to be encrypted.” “They should have known they had to train their staff to avoid phishing scams.” “They should have known...” Whatever security protocol completes that should-have-known statement, the reality is that no one can predict every scenario. If you try to manage data security through prediction, you will fail. It’s always a race between the good guys and the bad guys, and the bad guys only have to get it right one time to do serious damage. Instead of trying to predict and prevent every possible attack method, security teams need to implement technology capable of understanding normal user behavior and sounding alerts when activity deviates from established patterns.

 

The healthcare industry is at a pivotal point in terms of its data security. After a record year of data leaks and losses, security leaders know the havoc breaches wreak, and they know it’s time to re-evaluate their defenses. Instead of deploying tools that can only withstand one type of attack or implementing processes that ignore the inherent fallibility of human end users, CISOs need to pay attention to the user data itself. By focusing on user behavior intelligence, healthcare organizations can spot and stop attacks before hackers fatally damage their reputations.


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Ashley Anne Abeling's insight:

Technology has it advantages but this is one of the downsides of using it to store very personal and important information. Making sure that the offices I work for and educating my students on the importance of internet safety is a priority of mine as an educator. We take for granted technology and when something goes wrong we have to be prepared for the aftermath.

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Rescooped by Ashley Anne Abeling from Dental Implants
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Dental Impants vs Dentures_Vancouver Periodontist Dr. Bobby Birdi of BC Perio Interview - YouTube

ery commAre Dental Implants better than Dentures? Vancouver Periodontist Dr. Bobby Birdi from BC Perio explains the advantages of implants compared to dentures. 


Via Murry Shohat
Ashley Anne Abeling's insight:

This is a very common question that patients ask. Should they invest in implants or are dentures the way to go. His points are spot on. The video is quick and precise with good terminology for most patients.

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Murry Shohat's curator insight, November 20, 2014 11:19 AM


I like this short video. It clearly explains the virtues of a single implant over a denture.

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10 Things That Learners Pay Attention To (And How to Use Them in eLearning)

10 Things That Learners Pay Attention To (And How to Use Them in eLearning) | My PLN | Scoop.it
Even more than other types of education, eLearning must struggle to attract learners' attention: the Internet is full of distractions, and adult lear
Ashley Anne Abeling's insight:

This is spot on and I can relate to 8 out of 10 of these. 

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Rescooped by Ashley Anne Abeling from Alzheimer's Dementia
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POOR DENTAL HEALTH MAY LEAD TO ALZHEIMER’S

POOR DENTAL HEALTH MAY LEAD TO ALZHEIMER’S | My PLN | Scoop.it
People with poor oral hygiene or gum disease may be at a greater risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, a new study led by The University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) School of Medicine and Dentistry suggests.

Via Bob DeMarco
Ashley Anne Abeling's insight:

Alzheimer's does not have one particular cause but knowing that one can decrease their chances of it just by taking care of their oral health is extremely powerful. This needs to be in all dental offices and may be the one and only motivator for someone.

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Bob DeMarco's curator insight, July 30, 2013 8:23 AM

Alzheimer's Reading Room Knowledge Base

http://bit.ly/Xqw2Fh

Rescooped by Ashley Anne Abeling from Social Media and Healthcare
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Twitter 101 for Dental Health Professionals

Twitter has become a popular search tool and an important source of information. It enables the exchange of messages instantly through virtual connections acro…

Via Plus91
Ashley Anne Abeling's insight:

I have been introduced to Twitter from EDUC300 but this presentation discusses how a dental professional specifically can use twitter and the benefits of its use.  This encourages me to use Twitter after finishing my college courses.

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Rescooped by Ashley Anne Abeling from HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
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Why Hackers Love Healthcare Organizations

Why Hackers Love Healthcare Organizations | My PLN | Scoop.it

If you look at all the data breaches that took place in 2014, you might conclude that healthcare organizations have lax cybersecurity protocols. You’d be wrong, but it’s not hard to see how you might reach that conclusion. Last year, the healthcare sector reported more breaches—333 in all—than any other industry. Like any symptom viewed in isolation, diagnosing the real ailment in the healthcare industry requires a more thorough examination. Want to know why hackers are so intent on breaking into healthcare organizations’ systems—and so successful? Here are the top reasons:

 

Healthcare data is the most valuable data of all.


If a hacker goes through the trouble of infiltrating, say, an e-commerce vendor or a brick-and-mortar retailer, he’ll walk away with thousands or hundreds of thousands of credit card numbers. That’s no small haul, but credit card companies and consumers have learned to deal with breaches. Banks assign their customers new numbers, issue them new cards and promise to wipe any suspicious charges. By the time hackers can sell their stolen card data, much of it is useless.

 

Healthcare data, by contrast, gives criminals just about everything they need to steal identities, creating valuable goods to sell on the black market. A breach at a health insurance company, for example, could yield data ranging from bank account and Social Security numbers to medical history to family names and beyond. Think of all of the fraudulent accounts a criminal could open simply by getting ahold of a customer’s Social Security number, her address and her mother’s maiden name.

 

In an industry where everything is sensitive and regulated, workers resist additional controls.


Just like chief information security officers in other industries, CISOs working in healthcare evaluate their vulnerabilities and their priority technology upgrades on an ongoing basis. Because of healthcare information’s depth, deploying new technology can be complex, but selling users on that technology and its associated security protocols can be seriously challenging. A doctor who has to endure multiple controls just to  prescribe medication or complete another mundane task might understandably bristle when the security team introduces multi-factor authentication or some other process that he views as just another obstacle to doing his job.

 

Human beings—including medical providers—are fallible, and hackers know it.


When my wife was in the hospital for the birth of our daughter, I noticed something during every nursing shift. The staff left patient folders open on the front desk. There was ample security to protect newborns themselves, but not to protect their data. Harried working conditions also contribute to the potential exposure of digital data. If an over-tired doctor heads home after a 20-hour shift and forgets his laptop in the taxi, that could be just the opening a criminal needs to access an entire healthcare system. Humans aren’t error proof, which is why the technology, particularly in healthcare, has to be.

 

A hacker only needs to be right once; the healthcare organization needs to be right all the time.


For every high-profile data breach affecting a healthcare organization during the past 18 months, there are experts ready to say, “They should have known better.” “They should have known laptops have to be encrypted.” “They should have known they had to train their staff to avoid phishing scams.” “They should have known...” Whatever security protocol completes that should-have-known statement, the reality is that no one can predict every scenario. If you try to manage data security through prediction, you will fail. It’s always a race between the good guys and the bad guys, and the bad guys only have to get it right one time to do serious damage. Instead of trying to predict and prevent every possible attack method, security teams need to implement technology capable of understanding normal user behavior and sounding alerts when activity deviates from established patterns.

 

The healthcare industry is at a pivotal point in terms of its data security. After a record year of data leaks and losses, security leaders know the havoc breaches wreak, and they know it’s time to re-evaluate their defenses. Instead of deploying tools that can only withstand one type of attack or implementing processes that ignore the inherent fallibility of human end users, CISOs need to pay attention to the user data itself. By focusing on user behavior intelligence, healthcare organizations can spot and stop attacks before hackers fatally damage their reputations.


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Ashley Anne Abeling's insight:

Technology has it advantages but this is one of the downsides of using it to store very personal and important information. Making sure that the offices I work for and educating my students on the importance of internet safety is a priority of mine as an educator. We take for granted technology and when something goes wrong we have to be prepared for the aftermath.

more...
Rescooped by Ashley Anne Abeling from E-Learning, Instructional Design, and Online Teaching
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Fair Use in Education and Research — Columbia Copyright Advisory Office

Fair Use in Education and Research — Columbia Copyright Advisory Office | My PLN | Scoop.it
Fair use offers an extraordinarily important opportunity for educators, researchers, and others to make reasonable and limited uses of copyrighted materials. Clipping, cutting, pasting, uploading, posting, and many other activities that are common at the university may be copyright infringements or may be within fair use. When do you need to think about fair use? Some example situations:

Via Dennis T OConnor
Ashley Anne Abeling's insight:

Goes along with our first blogs of the semester! Great resource to refer back to.

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, July 2, 2015 8:19 PM

One of the best websites for anyone seeking to understand fair use of copyrighted materials in education.  The fair use checklist developed by Kenneth Crews is a fine tool.

Stephen (Steve) Evans's curator insight, July 14, 2015 7:29 AM

Good resource for copyright information.....

Henrietta Marcella Paz-Amor's curator insight, July 14, 2015 11:23 AM

This is a hot toping in K-12 and Higher Ed. - Columbia U is offering some information and guidelines. Take a look at their examples. 

Rescooped by Ashley Anne Abeling from Health Supreme
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Stem-Cell Dental Implants Grow New Teeth Right In Your Mouth

Stem-Cell Dental Implants Grow New Teeth Right In Your Mouth | My PLN | Scoop.it

The loss of a tooth is a minor deformity and a major pain. Although dental implants are available, the healing process can take months on end, and implants that fail to align with the ever-growing jawbone tend to fall out.

 

If only adult teeth could be regenerated, right?

 

According to a study published in the latest Journal of Dental Research, a new tissue regeneration technique may allow people to simply regrow a new set of pearly whites. 

 

By using a procedure developed in the university's Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Laboratory, Dr. Mao can direct the body's own stem cells toward the scaffold, which is made of natural materials. Once the stem cells have colonized the scaffold, a tooth can grow in the socket and then merge with the surrounding tissue. 


Dr. Mao's technique not only eliminates the need to grow teeth in a Petri dish, but it is the first to achieve regeneration of anatomically correct teeth by using the body's own resources.


Via Sepp Hasslberger
Ashley Anne Abeling's insight:

Stem cells may make bring greater attention to the dental profession and the importance of teeth. Seeing how teeth could aid in other research and creating our parts of the body is fascinating.

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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, July 10, 2015 6:37 PM

Good progress on the horizon in dentistry... grow a new tooth.

Rescooped by Ashley Anne Abeling from Longevity science
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Dental health for tweens

Dental health for tweens | My PLN | Scoop.it

Healthy tips for teeth, beyond avoiding sugar. 

 

Some that may surprise:

Tomatoes can degrade tooth enamel.

Parsley can help prevent decay.

Apples neutralize acids.

Chewing ice can contribute to bacteria build-up


Via Ray and Terry's
Ashley Anne Abeling's insight:

Society is filled with trends for all ages and being aware of these trends and how they may impact ones mouth is important. I see a variety of patients of all ages so knowing what is in and what is popular is important to educate them on how it can affect the rest of their body especially their teeth.

 

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Rescooped by Ashley Anne Abeling from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
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Toothbrush Care: Why It’s Important for Oral Health

Toothbrush Care: Why It’s Important for Oral Health | My PLN | Scoop.it
Sherman Geronimo-Tan / Flickr / CC BY As we’ve talked about in several of our posts, brushing your teeth regularly, attending your regular dental checkups and flossing are all keys to maintaining good oral health, which affects your overall health...

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
Ashley Anne Abeling's insight:

This article was very surprising to me and informative! I am a hygienist and I break some of these rules! I have a toothbrush that has an ultraviolet light which is where my brush heads are stored. It goes to show that we don't know EVERYTHING!

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Rescooped by Ashley Anne Abeling from Green Consumer Forum
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11 Ways to Fight Bad Breath Naturally ("regular maintenance is the key")

11 Ways to Fight Bad Breath Naturally ("regular maintenance is the key") | My PLN | Scoop.it
Some 25 to 30 percent of the world’s population suffer with halitosis, or bad breath.

Here are 10 ways to fight bad breath: 

- If you wear dentures, remove them at night and clean to get rid of bacterial buildup from food and drink.

- Drink plenty of water and swish cool water around in your mouth. This is especially helpful to freshen “morning breath.”

- Brush after every meal and floss, preferably twice a day.

- Replace your toothbrush every two to three months.

- Arrange regular dental checkups and cleanings.

- Scrape your tongue each morning with a tongue scraper or spoon to decrease the bacteria, fungi, and dead cells that can cause odor. Hold the tip of the tongue with gauze to pull it forward in order to clean the back of the tongue.

- Chew a handful of cloves, fennel seeds, or aniseeds. Their antiseptic qualities help fight halitosis-causing bacteria.

- Chew a piece of lemon or orange rind for a mouth- freshening burst of flavor. (Wash the rind thoroughly first.) The citric acid will stimulate the salivary glands—and fight bad breath.

- Chew a fresh sprig of parsley, basil, mint, or cilantro. The chlorophyll in these green plants neutralizes odors.

- Try a 30-second mouthwash rinse that is alcohol-free (unike many off-the-shelf products). Mix a cup of water with a teaspoon of baking soda (which changes the pH level and fights odor in the mouth) and a few drops of antimicrobial peppermint essential oil. Don’t swallow it! (Yields several rinses.)


Via Bert Guevara
Ashley Anne Abeling's insight:

Halitosis has many causes and this article lists the most common and precise practices to reduce it. This would make a great hand out for my patients. Many believe that just rinsing with mouthwash will rid them of it but you have to go to the source and remove that, bacteria!

 

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Bert Guevara's curator insight, January 28, 2015 9:29 PM

Your mouth need regular maintenance. Here are 11 suggestions.

 

"The origins of bad breath are not mysterious: dental cavities, gum disease, poor oral hygiene, coated tongue (a white or yellow coating on the tongue, usually due to inflammation) are among the most common."