PLASTICITIES « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world »
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PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world »
TRANSDISCIPLINARY NETWORK ON PLASTICITIES    /    RÉSEAU TRANSDISCIPLINAIRE SUR LES PLASTICITÉS  
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Myth and Psyche: The Evolution of Consciousness

Myth and Psyche: The Evolution of Consciousness | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it

Mythology is the most archaic and profound record we have of mankind's essential spirit and nature. As far back as we are able to trace the origins of our species, we find myth and myth-making as the fundamental language through which man relates to life's mystery and fashions meaning from his experiences. The world of myth has its own laws and its own reality. Instead of concepts and facts that make logical sense, we find patterns of irrational imagery whose meaning must be discerned or experienced by the participant-observer. Discovering these patterns of meaning is what Jung meant by the symbolic approach to religion, myth, and dream.


The mythic image is not to be taken literally and concretely...we must approach myth symbolically as revealed eternal 'truths' about mankind's psychic existence — about the reality of the psyche. 'Once upon a time' does not mean 'once' in history but refers to events that occur in eternal time, always and everywhere. Any myth is very much alive today. Every night in sleep we sink back into that source of all mythological imagery, the unconscious psyche — the origin of dreams. Many of our games have their roots in mythology and much of contemporary art, literature, and film is shot through with mythological themes..... (Click title for more)


Via Bonnie Bright
Kathy Mays's curator insight, June 3, 2015 3:20 AM

Nice description of why we look to myths and the symbolic imagery they present, which is still so alive in our lives today.

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Jung on "Instinct"

Jung on "Instinct" | PLASTICITIES  « Between matter and form, between experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world » | Scoop.it
Instinct. An involuntary drive toward certain activities. All psychic processes whose energies are not under conscious control are instinctive.

 

Jung identified five prominent groups of instinctive factors: creativity, reflection, activity, sexuality and hunger. Hunger is a primary instinct of self-preservation, perhaps the most fundamental of all drives. Sexuality is a close second, particularly prone to psychization, which makes it possible to divert its purely biological energy into other channels. The urge to activity manifests in travel, love of change, restlessness and play. Under reflection, Jung included the religious urge and the search for meaning. Creativity was for Jung in a class by itself. His descriptions of it refer specifically to the impulse to create art.

 

Though we cannot classify it with a high degree of accuracy, the creative instinct is something that deserves special mention. I do not know if “instinct” is the correct word. We use the term “creative instinct” because this factor behaves at least dynamically, like an instinct. Like instinct it is compulsive, but it is not common, and it is not a fixed and invariably....(Click title for more)


Via Bonnie Bright
maria taveras's curator insight, January 24, 2015 2:04 PM

Thank you Bonnie  for this gem of a fine. 

Laura Smith-Riva's curator insight, January 24, 2015 9:20 PM

Our instincts and how they have been distorted, misused, or repressed are often reflected in the dreams. The dream will always want to move us toward wholeness...all instincts functioning and engaged in our lives.