Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
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Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News
Pharmaguy curates and provides insights into selected drug industry news and issues.
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"Ethnically Ambiguous" Man in His 30’s/40’s Sought for #Pharma Print Ad

"Ethnically Ambiguous" Man in His 30’s/40’s Sought for #Pharma Print Ad | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it
Middle aged man, average to heavy build.


Seeking 10 models total for a pharmaceutical print ad. Six will be cast as background pharma professionals and four as featured parent and child pairs.


Principal talent pays (Parent and child pairs): $1,500+20% agency fee Background talent pays: $500+20% agency fee.


Principal talent: Male, ages 28-45, Hispanic, Asian, South Asian, Native American, Middle Eastern, Southeast Asian / Pacific Islander, Ethnically Ambiguous / Mixed Race

Pharma Guy's insight:

What about the DTC advertising mascots? What do they get paid? See the gallery of mascots here: http://bit.ly/pmbmascots 

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Do #Pharma Drug Ads in Medical Journals Perpetuate the Stigma of Depression?

Do #Pharma Drug Ads in Medical Journals Perpetuate the Stigma of Depression? | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

As specialists in healthcare, stigma is something we frequently encounter across many of the disease areas in which we work. This is most evident when we are conducting research directly with patients and particularly in the emerging markets, which is my team’s focus.  From sexually transmitted diseases to mental illness, shame may be associated with their condition and is a devastating reality for many of the patients we seek to understand. 


The US National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) campaign to end discrimination against mental illness was heavily funded by a number of major pharmaceutical companies. Some commentators view such industry campaigns with cynicism, particularly in the more ambiguously defined and less clear cut therapy areas such as mental health. Making a label or diagnosis more ‘socially acceptable’ can be argued to be neither preventative nor curative but causative, i.e. done for the sole purpose of selling more people more drugs they don't need.
 
Pharmaceutical marketing materials have also been accused of perpetuating stigma. A 2010 literature review published in the Journal of Mental Health found that advertisements for psychiatric medication were more likely to include negative imagery and less likely to portray people in everyday situations.

Pharma Guy's insight:


Here's some comments from the authors of the research mentioned:


The way thapsychiatric medicatiois advertisein professional journals continues toperpetuate certain images and ideas regarding mental ill health. It is clearly separated fromany other health problem: advertisements for psychiatric medication are likely to containimages of people portrayed in abnormal situations in a negative way, and to include less textthan advertisements for non-psychiatric medication. The text that is used is more likely tofocus on narrative description of ‘case studies’ of people suffering from a particular mental health problerather than on anspecifimedically-relateinformatioabouthemedication itself: these individuals are almost always portrayed before any treatment, incontrast to individuals in advertisements for non-psychiatric medication, who are portrayedas living happily and actively after successful treatment.


In addition to any effects on the professionals who encounter these advertisements, thereis also thhighly importanissuof thoveralmessagthat differencebetweenadvertisements for psychiatric and non-psychiatric medication sends to client and patientpopulations, and indeed to the wider general public. To maintain a distinction betweenmental health problems and other health problems, and in particular to portray mental illhealth more in terms of chaos, deviance, fear and Otherness risks perpetuating stigma thatprofessionals, and service users, may strive so hard to dismantle in other areas.


Read the research here: http://bit.ly/1MKd8En



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The Agency that Created this MediScripts Rx Pad Ad Must Have Quite a Sense of Humor

The Agency that Created this MediScripts Rx Pad Ad Must Have Quite a Sense of Humor | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

This full-page ad for mediscripts prescription pads in the April 2015 edition of PM360 caught my attention.


I guess pharma companies can place Rx drug ads within these pads as shown in the example above, which shows an ad for "Once-Daily Havitol," a fake drug.

This is very funny on many levels, but also not funny. Did the agency that created this ad realize what a Google search on "Havitol" yields? If so, it has quite a sense of humor. Let me explain.


Read more here: http://bit.ly/1HvUDi5 

Pharma Guy's insight:


If this is embarrassing, mediscripts should have advertised in Pharma Marketing News. The editor of that publication would have caught this faux pas.

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FDA Prohibits Package Inserts in DTC Print Ads & Recommends New "Consumer Brief Summary"

FDA Prohibits Package Inserts in DTC Print Ads & Recommends New "Consumer Brief Summary" | Pharmaguy's Insights Into Drug Industry News | Scoop.it

On February 4, 2004, the FDA issued long-awaited draft guidance documents designed to improve communications to consumers and health care practitioners about health conditions and medical products. One document was titled “Brief Summary: Disclosing Risk Information in Consumer-Directed Print Advertisements.”

“Our new regulatory guidance,” said Mark B. McClellan, M.D., Ph.D., FDA Commissioner at the time, “provides new direction to sponsors on how to provide higher-quality health information to the public, based on recent evidence on what works and what doesn't in drug promotion” (read "FDA Draft Guidance for Print DTCA: Less than Feared").

But now even NEWER evidence - and complaints from the pharma industry - forced the FDA to issue a "revised draft guidance" titled "Brief Summary and Adequate Directions for Use: Disclosing Risk Information in Consumer-Directed Print Advertisements and Promotional Labeling for Human Prescription Drugs," which you can find here (Docket No. FDA-2004-D-0500).

Released on February 9, 2015, this revision was ELEVEN years in the making. Compared to that, the four years FDA took to issue draft social media guidelines was lightening fast.

The guidelines address the requirement under provisions of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act), which require that an advertisement for a prescription drug to disclose each side effect, warning, precaution, and contraindication from the labeling. This is referred to as the "brief summary requirement."

So what's new in the guidelines? Read more...

Pharma Guy's insight:


One consumer-friendly format that FDA recommended is a "Prescription Drug Facts Box," which is based on a format used for OTC products. In 2009, a Dartmouth Study concluded that a "Fact Box" on risk/benefit is good for consumers. The study included a mock up of a Fact Box for Lunesta (shown below), a popular sleep aid drug that was heavily advertised to consumers at that time.

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