Performance Under Pressure: Navigating Rapid Change
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Preventing Physician Burnout

Preventing Physician Burnout | Performance Under Pressure: Navigating Rapid Change | Scoop.it

In a cross-sectional survey ("Predictors of physician career satisfaction, work-life balance, and burnout," Obstetrics & Gynecology) of randomly selected physicians from across the country just under half of all respondents indicated that they were satisfied with their work-life balance, and half of respondents indicated that they felt some level of emotional "resilience." It turns out that the lack of these two factors plays a significant role in the development of physician burnout; a syndrome that occurs when a person is under constant pressure, and is marked by emotional exhaustion, cynicism, feeling ineffective in one's work, and experiencing interpersonal difficulties. Burnout in physicians, which has been on the rise, has been linked to impaired job performance, poor health, marital difficulties, and alcohol or substance abuse.

 

The good news is that there are strategies that can be taken to significantly reduce the incidence and negative effects of burnout. Factors that are critical to combating burnout are having control over one's schedule, the number of hours worked, and emotional resilience. Unfortunately, in this current era of healthcare reform, controlling the first two factors can be quite challenging, but not impossible, if one takes a conscious and deliberate approach to managing priorities and time. Many physicians find that they spend a significant amount of time on activities that do not provide enough value — one way to think about this is to determine your "time ROI" (return on investment).

 

Follow these five steps to significantly improve your work-life imbalance:


1. Identify the five to eight most important aspects of your life (what you value most).

2. Now determine how much time you devote to those areas (and how much time is spent in areas not on your list).

3. If there is a disconnect between what you value and how you spend your time, this is a signal to you to make changes in your life.

4. Plan your time so that you are focused on what you value most.

5. Determine what can be delegated to others.

 

Preventing burnout also involves developing emotional resilience — the ability to manage stressful situations effectively and prevent stress from building up. For this we turn to some interesting research from the field of neuroscience that explores the link between stress, sleep, and positivity. These three factors have an interdependent relationship with one another — cause a change in one, and the other two are impacted.

 

So for example, the more stress in your life, the worse your sleep and mood. If you get too little sleep, then you will experience more stress and a lowered mood. In general, it can be difficult to derive meaningful change in the first two factors, sleep and stress, but much easier to have an impact on the latter one — positivity. If you are able to increase positivity, you will experience a significant improvement in sleep and a significant reduction in stress (negative emotional state).

 

Follow these simple brain-training steps to increase your positivity:


1. Practice positive "self-talk" by cultivating self-encouragement optimism, recognizing accomplishments, and appreciating good fortune.

2. Challenge your negative (typically distorted) thinking, the most common of which are:

 

• Catastrophic thinking. Identify a more realistic assessment of the situation. Usually, things are not as bad as we think they are. And often, our greatest learning comes from adversity.

• Black and white thinking. Challenge all-or-nothing thinking. Usually there is some gray area to work with. It is very seldom absolute.

• Jumping to conclusions. Avoid leaping to a foregone conclusion, such as thinking you know what others must be thinking. Learn to get curious, ask questions, and look for alternative explanations.

• Over generalizing. Look for a more accurate appraisal of the situation. When we look more closely at situations, we often find that negative or stressful outcomes are limited to that event, not generalizable across all situations.

• Excessive criticism. Whenever you hear yourself thinking, "should," substitute "it would be nice." This allows you to avoid excessive self-criticism or the belief that there is only one solution.

Changing thinking leads to changes in behaviors which leads to changes in results. So the easiest and most efficient method to change the results you are getting is to engage in positive and constructive thought patterns. As you transform your thoughts, you actually create an alteration in the neural connections in your brain. This in turn, leads to the development of new habits, ensuring that the changes you create are lasting ones.


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Dan Diamond, MD's insight:

I also suggest that people have a team of at least 10 people that will encourage and challenge them. If you team is too small, it is easy to burn them out. Write the name of your ten on paper and post it on the back of your medicine cabinet. Reconnect, stay connected. 

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The Science Behind What Really Drives Performance (It's Going to Surprise You)

The Science Behind What Really Drives Performance (It's Going to Surprise You) | Performance Under Pressure: Navigating Rapid Change | Scoop.it
If you're skeptical that this is too touchy-feely for a business setting, the research doesn't lie.
Dan Diamond, MD's insight:

Do you have this superpower?

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Tips for Reversing Physician Burnout Caused by EHR Use

Tips for Reversing Physician Burnout Caused by EHR Use | Performance Under Pressure: Navigating Rapid Change | Scoop.it
Addressing EHR-related physician burnout requires a closer look into the design and functionality of EHR technology.
Dan Diamond, MD's insight:
It's time to incentivize EMR companies based on the number of clicks it takes to get work done. 
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Rescooped by Dan Diamond, MD from Healthcare and Technology news
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Preventing Physician Burnout

Preventing Physician Burnout | Performance Under Pressure: Navigating Rapid Change | Scoop.it

In a cross-sectional survey ("Predictors of physician career satisfaction, work-life balance, and burnout," Obstetrics & Gynecology) of randomly selected physicians from across the country just under half of all respondents indicated that they were satisfied with their work-life balance, and half of respondents indicated that they felt some level of emotional "resilience." It turns out that the lack of these two factors plays a significant role in the development of physician burnout; a syndrome that occurs when a person is under constant pressure, and is marked by emotional exhaustion, cynicism, feeling ineffective in one's work, and experiencing interpersonal difficulties. Burnout in physicians, which has been on the rise, has been linked to impaired job performance, poor health, marital difficulties, and alcohol or substance abuse.

 

The good news is that there are strategies that can be taken to significantly reduce the incidence and negative effects of burnout. Factors that are critical to combating burnout are having control over one's schedule, the number of hours worked, and emotional resilience. Unfortunately, in this current era of healthcare reform, controlling the first two factors can be quite challenging, but not impossible, if one takes a conscious and deliberate approach to managing priorities and time. Many physicians find that they spend a significant amount of time on activities that do not provide enough value — one way to think about this is to determine your "time ROI" (return on investment).

 

Follow these five steps to significantly improve your work-life imbalance:


1. Identify the five to eight most important aspects of your life (what you value most).

2. Now determine how much time you devote to those areas (and how much time is spent in areas not on your list).

3. If there is a disconnect between what you value and how you spend your time, this is a signal to you to make changes in your life.

4. Plan your time so that you are focused on what you value most.

5. Determine what can be delegated to others.

 

Preventing burnout also involves developing emotional resilience — the ability to manage stressful situations effectively and prevent stress from building up. For this we turn to some interesting research from the field of neuroscience that explores the link between stress, sleep, and positivity. These three factors have an interdependent relationship with one another — cause a change in one, and the other two are impacted.

 

So for example, the more stress in your life, the worse your sleep and mood. If you get too little sleep, then you will experience more stress and a lowered mood. In general, it can be difficult to derive meaningful change in the first two factors, sleep and stress, but much easier to have an impact on the latter one — positivity. If you are able to increase positivity, you will experience a significant improvement in sleep and a significant reduction in stress (negative emotional state).

 

Follow these simple brain-training steps to increase your positivity:


1. Practice positive "self-talk" by cultivating self-encouragement optimism, recognizing accomplishments, and appreciating good fortune.

2. Challenge your negative (typically distorted) thinking, the most common of which are:

 

• Catastrophic thinking. Identify a more realistic assessment of the situation. Usually, things are not as bad as we think they are. And often, our greatest learning comes from adversity.

• Black and white thinking. Challenge all-or-nothing thinking. Usually there is some gray area to work with. It is very seldom absolute.

• Jumping to conclusions. Avoid leaping to a foregone conclusion, such as thinking you know what others must be thinking. Learn to get curious, ask questions, and look for alternative explanations.

• Over generalizing. Look for a more accurate appraisal of the situation. When we look more closely at situations, we often find that negative or stressful outcomes are limited to that event, not generalizable across all situations.

• Excessive criticism. Whenever you hear yourself thinking, "should," substitute "it would be nice." This allows you to avoid excessive self-criticism or the belief that there is only one solution.

Changing thinking leads to changes in behaviors which leads to changes in results. So the easiest and most efficient method to change the results you are getting is to engage in positive and constructive thought patterns. As you transform your thoughts, you actually create an alteration in the neural connections in your brain. This in turn, leads to the development of new habits, ensuring that the changes you create are lasting ones.


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Dan Diamond, MD's insight:

I also suggest that people have a team of at least 10 people that will encourage and challenge them. If you team is too small, it is easy to burn them out. Write the name of your ten on paper and post it on the back of your medicine cabinet. Reconnect, stay connected. 

more...
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Rescooped by Dan Diamond, MD from LeadershipABC
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Forget the Vision, Make the Connections

Forget the Vision, Make the Connections | Performance Under Pressure: Navigating Rapid Change | Scoop.it

New leaders don’t spend nearly enough time and effort being intentional about how they show up and how they spend their own time. The effort they devote to forming meaningful connections with the people in the organization is almost an afterthought.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Dan Diamond, MD's insight:
Here's some powerful insights into how you can build better connections to make a bigger impact in your world. This is practical stuff you're going to want to read it.
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Moving Beyond Problem Solving: A Potential-Based Approach - Huffington Post

Moving Beyond Problem Solving: A Potential-Based Approach - Huffington Post | Performance Under Pressure: Navigating Rapid Change | Scoop.it
Asking these two questions gives me the freedom to work with what is wanting to happing, instead of spending my energy on either pushing or pulling.
Dan Diamond, MD's insight:

Simple yet significant insight you may want to try next time you face a challenge. All too often, when people are faced with big and significant problems, they focus so intensely on the problem that they shift to convergent thinking and that can block new insights.  Here are two simple questions that you can ask that will give your brain a fighting chance. 

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5 Tips to Get a Grip on All That Stress

5 Tips to Get a Grip on All That Stress | Performance Under Pressure: Navigating Rapid Change | Scoop.it
Balancing your life and overcoming anxiety is the single most important thing you can learn as an individual.
Dan Diamond, MD's insight:

Here is some great insight that people pay money for when they come to my office. 

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A 23-Minute Morning Ritual That Will Transform Your Whole Day

A 23-Minute Morning Ritual That Will Transform Your Whole Day | Performance Under Pressure: Navigating Rapid Change | Scoop.it
How cool is science? Now you can set yourself up every morning for an awesome day by doing these simple activities.
Dan Diamond, MD's insight:

This 23 minute investment has a tremendous payoff for performance.

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The Power Of Leadership Mindsets

The Power Of Leadership Mindsets | Performance Under Pressure: Navigating Rapid Change | Scoop.it

In the new world of work, the high-performing organizations will be those who can continually transform from within. Start with leadership mindsets.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Dan Diamond, MD's insight:

There are four primary type of mindset:

1). BYSTANDERS: the powerless-givers that "wish" they could do something. They are not engaged and don't contribute.

2). VICTIMS: the powerless-takers that yell, "help me!" They consume resources and leave a wake of damage.

3). MANIPULATORS: the powerful-takers that demand, "for me!". They may get ahead for a while but only at the expense of others.

4). THRIVER: the powerful-givers who's motto is "for you". They focus on equipping others to succeed and don't care who gets the credit.

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, June 23, 2015 11:50 AM

Change has clearly become the new normal and organizations that can seamlessly navigate the constant state of disruption will best position themselves for success in the future world of work. In such environments there is an imperative for leaders to go first, setting the example for all others to follow. Leaders who approach the change with the right mindsets, and leaders who send the right messages through how they act and behave.


Steve Bax's curator insight, June 24, 2015 4:01 AM

A thought provoking article. Two elements are particularly notable: A quote from Tim Cook, CEO of Apple ...: “We change every day. We changed every day when he (Steve Jobs) was here, and we’ve been changing every day since he’s not been here. But the core and the values in the core remain the same as they were in ’98, as they were in ’05, as they were in ’10. I don’t think the values should change. But everything else can change.” and within the article...

 

What we typically don’t consider however, is it’s not the overt messages that make or break us, it’s the covert ones, the ones we are not thinking about or aware of. Thus, most times when we find our teams and organizations resisting change, our answer as to why is staring right back at us in the mirror.

 

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The Art Of Problem Solving Using Pencil & Paper - Awesome Mind Secrets!

The Art Of Problem Solving Using Pencil & Paper - Awesome Mind Secrets! | Performance Under Pressure: Navigating Rapid Change | Scoop.it

Via Colin Gary Smith
Dan Diamond, MD's insight:

Here is a mind hack that you can use today. When I am under pressure -- whether international disasters or problem solving at work -- sketching, mapping or modeling can help reveal breakthroughs and the ability to communicate solutions rapidly. 

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How to Get Good at Stress - Daily Beast

How to Get Good at Stress - Daily Beast | Performance Under Pressure: Navigating Rapid Change | Scoop.it
Dan Diamond, MD's insight:

This has a lot to do with focus. You go where you look. If you focus on the negative, stress will stuff you down a hole. If you focus on the positive stress can motivate you to improve. Where are you looking?

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Use Stress to Your Advantage

Use Stress to Your Advantage | Performance Under Pressure: Navigating Rapid Change | Scoop.it
To perform under pressure, research finds that welcoming anxiety is more helpful than calming down.
Dan Diamond, MD's insight:

If you think stress is bad for you, it will be. 

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