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Staff Training Crucial in ICD-10 Conversion Preparations

Staff Training Crucial in ICD-10 Conversion Preparations | Outsource your therapy billing successfully | Scoop.it

Healthcare providers who are behind in their ICD-10 conversion preparations may benefit from following the ICD-10 Quick Start Guide provided by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).


The five steps that providers will need to take when it comes to their ICD-10 conversion preparations are the following: (1) developing a plan, (2) training the healthcare staff, (3) updating system processes, (4) working with vendors and health insurers, and (5) testing workflow processes and systems.


When it comes to training the clinical staff (including nurses, doctors, and medical assistants) and moving forward with ICD-10 conversion preparations, it’s vital to focus on new clinical concepts and documentation obtained through ICD-10 codes. When training coding and administrative staff including coders, billers, and practice management employees, the focus should be on ICD-10 fundamentals.


CMS provides a variety of resources including webinars, national provider calls and presentations, the Road to 10 website, and email updates. Physician groups, healthcare organizations, hospitals, payers, and vendors also offer a variety of resources for medical providers who are still behind with some common ICD-10 conversion preparations.


The very first step to take is to identify the top 25 most common ICD-9 codes used in one’s medical facility. Common diagnosis codes are also available on the Road to 10 website and other resources.


Teach your healthcare and coding staff how to code the most common cases using the ICD-10 coding set. Using reports via one’s practice management software and billing documents, providers can better identify the most commonly used ICD-9 codes.


Once the top 25 codes are gathered and there is still time before the ICD-10 implementationdeadline, providers are encouraged to expand ICD-10 coding of typical cases past an additional 50 or more codes. This would ensure the majority of a provider’s cases are managed effectively under ICD-10.


Even though the ICD-10 coding set has expanded to more than 68,000 codes, providers will only need to use a small section of the set. Along with training staff, updating system processes is vital for one’s ICD-10 conversion preparations. All hardcopy and electronic forms need to be updated while information gaps should be resolved before the October 1 deadline.


Clinical documentation will need to include laterality, the number of encounters (initial or subsequent), kinds of fractures, and other information about related complications. It is useful to put together a documentation checklist detailing new concepts that should be captured with ICD-10 codes. Once systems are in place, ICD-10 end-to-end testing is crucial to ensure a healthcare facility is prepared for the October 1 deadline.


“With four months remaining to correct issues discovered during testing, the high rate of successful submission of ICD-10 codes is especially encouraging for physician offices since half the claims submitted for end-to-testing were professional claims,” the Coalition for ICD-10 commented on CMS’ latest ICD-10 end-to-end testing results. “These results indicate that significant progress has been made since the January end-to-end testing with the overall rejection rate dropping from 19 to 12 percent and ICD-10 rejections dropping from 3 to 2 percent.”


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
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Excellent advice for ICD-10 preparedness.

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Staff Training Crucial in ICD-10 Conversion Preparations

Staff Training Crucial in ICD-10 Conversion Preparations | Outsource your therapy billing successfully | Scoop.it

Healthcare providers who are behind in their ICD-10 conversion preparations may benefit from following the ICD-10 Quick Start Guide provided by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).


The five steps that providers will need to take when it comes to their ICD-10 conversion preparations are the following: (1) developing a plan, (2) training the healthcare staff, (3) updating system processes, (4) working with vendors and health insurers, and (5) testing workflow processes and systems.


When it comes to training the clinical staff (including nurses, doctors, and medical assistants) and moving forward with ICD-10 conversion preparations, it’s vital to focus on new clinical concepts and documentation obtained through ICD-10 codes. When training coding and administrative staff including coders, billers, and practice management employees, the focus should be on ICD-10 fundamentals.


CMS provides a variety of resources including webinars, national provider calls and presentations, the Road to 10 website, and email updates. Physician groups, healthcare organizations, hospitals, payers, and vendors also offer a variety of resources for medical providers who are still behind with some common ICD-10 conversion preparations.


The very first step to take is to identify the top 25 most common ICD-9 codes used in one’s medical facility. Common diagnosis codes are also available on the Road to 10 website and other resources.


Teach your healthcare and coding staff how to code the most common cases using the ICD-10 coding set. Using reports via one’s practice management software and billing documents, providers can better identify the most commonly used ICD-9 codes.


Once the top 25 codes are gathered and there is still time before the ICD-10 implementationdeadline, providers are encouraged to expand ICD-10 coding of typical cases past an additional 50 or more codes. This would ensure the majority of a provider’s cases are managed effectively under ICD-10.


Even though the ICD-10 coding set has expanded to more than 68,000 codes, providers will only need to use a small section of the set. Along with training staff, updating system processes is vital for one’s ICD-10 conversion preparations. All hardcopy and electronic forms need to be updated while information gaps should be resolved before the October 1 deadline.


Clinical documentation will need to include laterality, the number of encounters (initial or subsequent), kinds of fractures, and other information about related complications. It is useful to put together a documentation checklist detailing new concepts that should be captured with ICD-10 codes. Once systems are in place, ICD-10 end-to-end testing is crucial to ensure a healthcare facility is prepared for the October 1 deadline.


“With four months remaining to correct issues discovered during testing, the high rate of successful submission of ICD-10 codes is especially encouraging for physician offices since half the claims submitted for end-to-testing were professional claims,” the Coalition for ICD-10 commented on CMS’ latest ICD-10 end-to-end testing results. “These results indicate that significant progress has been made since the January end-to-end testing with the overall rejection rate dropping from 19 to 12 percent and ICD-10 rejections dropping from 3 to 2 percent.”


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
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Excellent advice for ICD-10 preparedness.

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Five Strategies to Boost Medical Practice Income | Physicians Practice

Five Strategies to Boost Medical Practice Income | Physicians Practice | Outsource your therapy billing successfully | Scoop.it

Let’s face it. The world of healthcare has altered dramatically and in many markets that has had a negative effect on physician practices. Additionally, insurance and other expenses have increased, creating a further decline in the way many physicians can make money and keep their money.

It is time for physicians and even their staff members to develop strategies that ensure that revenues maintain and most importantly, that they all get paid.  Here are five strategies to help you get started:


1. Consider Expenses vs. Costs
In my work with practices, one of the first items that requires scrutiny is expenses. Although physicians must remain within reimbursement guidelines, there are still costs for treatment. Therefore, all physicians should conduct a cost per patient analysis so that costs factor in expenses associated with the treatment. So for example, a cardiologist must factor in utilities, salaries, equipment depreciation, leasing, etc., to determine the correct cost to return profit. Failure to meet expenses can mean failure of the practice.


2. Automate Processes
Second, too many doctors and staff conduct too much heavy lifting. For example, one orthopedist I worked with had his staff keep a paper file of all scheduled appointments for the day as well as another for X-rays and other test results. This not only wasted time in duplicated effort, it wasted time because an automated process within the EHR could have taken care of this work. Practices must determine if an automated system can replace manual labor, and take advantage.


3. Set Hard Rules
Third, we live in a crazy busy world, as do our patients. However, this does not discount rudeness and unprofessionalism. Nothing is worse than patient no shows. This may not appear as a money drain but if 10 percent of your 2,500 patients do not show, conduct the arithmetic and you will be surprised. It may be necessary (depending on state requirements) to charge for no shows or non-rescheduled appointments.


4. Offer Additional Services
Fourth, patients visit with you because of their trust and respect for your services. Many physicians today are attempting to adopt ancillary services as methods to create additional income, yet some have not done so. In our present world, in which obesity is on the rise and the elderly population is growing, there is no reason why some physicians cannot offer complementary services. For example, orthopedists can offer physical therapy, cardiologists can offer dietary and weight counseling, a general practitioner might offer consulting or classes that create networks and support groups.


5. Consider Alternate Models
Another opportunity stems from the Affordable Care Act. Many large and even small corporations are hiring insurance and consulting companies to facilitate wellness programs to decrease high healthcare costs. Firms that participate in these programs gain a healthy discount on their premiums. For the physician there is very little setup, just time. The physician can meet and consult as often as desired and organizations pay large fees for these services. Further, these wellness programs are terrific sources of individual referrals because the physician is able to present content in front of large groups of people.


In addition to these revenue-boosting options, many physicians are now offering concierge practices so that they can charge a high fee to a very specific demographic. While some time and attention needs to be taken in terms of setup, a well-established physician might consider proposing the idea to a small group of 12 patients. This initial group can provide a revenue boost.


According to a recent report appearing on Becker's Hospital Review, roughly 70 percent of U.S. concierge medicine and direct-pay primary-care physicians are internal medicine specialists, with most treating six patients to eight patients each day. Finally, 71 percent of concierge and direct-pay physicians report they are doing "better" financially than in 2008.


No matter the direction the physician decides to take, it is clear that remaining staid in today’s competitive changing marketplace is not the answer. Change is the only way to provide revenue to the practice. Making some of these changes will make the difference in a practice thriving versus one that is merely surviving.


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
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Working smarter, not harder is definitely needed in today's environment.

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Technical Dr. Inc.'s curator insight, October 8, 2014 8:16 AM

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com/tdr
- The Technical Doctor Team

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Functional Limitation Reporting in Your EMR

Functional Limitation Reporting in Your EMR | Outsource your therapy billing successfully | Scoop.it
There are a lot of myths, misconceptions and fears about functional limitation reporting. The bottom line is that clinicians who see Medicare patients after July 1, 2015 must use functional limitation codes on their documentation for the initial evaluation, at least once every 10 visits, and at the time of discharge or they won’t get paid.

All practitioners need is an EMR system that prompts them to select one of the functional limitation measures and the goal codes at the appropriate time. It’s then a simple matter of sending the claim to the clearinghouse and on to Medicare for approval and payment. Functional limitation reporting is essentially a goal-oriented process.

 Clinical Judgment

The judgment of the physical therapist is critical in meeting functional limitation reporting requirements. Therapists will need to document the patient’s condition at the initial visit, the selected treatment plan, severity of the client’s limitation and the expected outcome when therapy is completed.

In Touch EMR™ provides clinicians with prompts for all the information, G-codes and modifiers needed and at the appropriate times to remain within compliance. The data automatically goes into the patient file for transmission.

Supporting Evidence

Documentation to support every decision, measure taken and treatment is critical. Therapists must maintain a record of the patient’s level of function upon their initial visit using their best clinical judgment, combined with the information obtained from the patient.

Listen closely to what the client says and observe their range of movement to accurately select the level of severity under which they’re functioning. Meticulous records are necessary to document the condition of the patient at each treatment session and when the patient is discharged from further therapy. The process begins again if further treatment is required.

The EMR clinicians choose should have the ability to prompt them at the three major checkpoints of functional limitation reporting – initial evaluation, the 10th visit, and at discharge. In Touch EMR™ provides practitioners with that functionality, making it easy to remain in compliance and get paid.



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Make sure your biller knows the ins and outs of FLR!

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Free iOS App from ADP AdvancedMD Allows Any Physician Practice to Assess ICD-10 Preparedness

Free iOS App from ADP AdvancedMD Allows Any Physician Practice to Assess ICD-10 Preparedness | Outsource your therapy billing successfully | Scoop.it

South Jordan, Utah – February 24, 2015– ADP® AdvancedMD, a leader in all-in-one, cloud electronic health record (EHR), practice management, medical scheduling, medical billing services as well as a pioneer of big data reporting and business intelligence for smaller medical practices, today announced the release and availability of AdvancedMD ICD-10 Toolkit, a free app that gives private practices a suite of ICD-10 preparation tools. Now anyone with an iPhone or iPad running iOS8 can easily test their readiness and train staff for the October 1deadline, free of charge. Customers of AdvancedMD practice management software can also leverage the app to add ICD-10 codes to their charge slip templates.

“ADP AdvancedMD has been a leader in the ICD-10 transition process and a champion of independent physicians and small practices, with such tools as MyICD10.AdvancedMD.com, a website aimed at helping medical practices prepare for the ICD-10 transition, featuring a timeline and a wealth of tools, training and tips to help practices prepare for the change,” said Raul Villar, president, ADP AdvancedMD. “With less than half of all practices ready for the change, we saw a need for a tool that would aid the entire community of independent physicians in their progress.”

The app was created as part of the ADP AdvancedMD iCommit program, which offers incentives to engineers for independently pursuing innovations in addition to their regular jobs.

“We decided that there should be a tool to help everyone prepare for the change to ICD-10 and give our community the ability to gauge their readiness,” said Barlow Tucker, software engineer, ADP AdvancedMD. “A free app was the clear choice because it’s easy to access and use, plus it allows people to get an ICD-10 ‘checkup’ at any time.”

The AdvancedMD ICD-10 Toolkit allows users to:

– Track preparedness for ICD-10
– Compare ICD-9 codes with the ICD-10 equivalents, including risk of increased specificity
– View potential high-risk areas
– Search for ICD-10 codes and sub codes
– View articles and action plans to guide a specific transition

Download the new AdvancedMD ICD-10 Toolkit app for iPad®, iPhone®, and iPod Touch® available for free on the Apple app store.



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Why this is our choice for software solution.

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Occupational Therapy

Occupational Therapy | Outsource your therapy billing successfully | Scoop.it
Occupational therapy can help improve kids' cognitive, physical, and motor skills and enhance their self-esteem and sense of accomplishment.

Via Jessica Zavolta
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Always a better solution than drugs.

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Jessica Zavolta's comment, March 5, 2014 8:54 AM
Pediatric Occupational therapy can be very beneficial to kids that have broken bones, have autism or down syndrome, burns and many others. The therapist would help the kids to learn and improve motor skill, hand-eye coordination, behavioral disorders, physical disabilities, and sensory/attentional issues. In addition, they would also help the kids to build on their confidence.
Jessica Zavolta's comment, April 25, 2014 9:12 AM
1
María's curator insight, October 16, 2015 12:22 PM

PAEDIATRIC OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

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Outcomes after ICD-10 Transition Deadline Look Promising

Outcomes after ICD-10 Transition Deadline Look Promising | Outsource your therapy billing successfully | Scoop.it

Those who have had concerns about the coming ICD-10 transition deadline may have less to worry about now that the latest batch of ICD-10 end-to-end testing from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has been successful. The acceptance rates of the ICD-10 claims during the April end-to-end testing has been higher than the prior round of end-to-end testing from January, according tothe Journal of AHIMA.


Essentially, there has been more test claims sent to CMS as well as fewer errors found after submitting the ICD-10 claims. This points the way toward a more successful ICD-10 transition deadline come October, as fewer mistakes would keep financial reimbursement across the healthcare sector more stable. Most importantly, the majority of errors that did occur during the end-to-end testing period were not related to ICD-9 or ICD-10 codes.


“With four months remaining to correct issues discovered during testing, the high rate of successful submission of ICD-10 codes is especially encouraging for physician offices since half the claims submitted for end-to-testing were professional claims,” theCoalition for ICD-10 stated in an article. “These results indicate that significant progress has been made since the January end-to-end testing with the overall rejection rate dropping from 19 to 12 percent and ICD-10 rejections dropping from 3 to 2 percent.”


Out of the 23,138 test claims that were sent over to CMS, a total of 20,306 ICD-10 end-to-end testing claims were accepted. This shows that as many as 88 percent of claims should be accepted when the ICD-10 transition deadline rolls around. While this is good news, there may be slight problems at a handful of medical facilities as 2 percent of claims submitted were found invalid due to errors in ICD-10 diagnosis or procedure codes.


The Coalition for ICD-10 also explains that there were “zero claims rejected due to front-end CMS system issues for professional and supplier claims.” Since out of the 12 percent of rejected claims only 2 percent were due to actual ICD-9 or ICD-10 coding errors, the healthcare industry seems to be in a stronger position toward successfully submitting their claims after the ICD-10 transition deadline.


The other errors that occurred hold no bearing on ICD-10 and would only be rejected under ICD-9, the Coalition states. Currently, CMS systems are capable of accepting institutional claims as well as professional and supplier claims.


Everyone who participated in ICD-10 end-to-end testing in April received Remittance Advices, which should steer them toward the right direction if any errors occurred on their end. Currently, there is less than four months to fix any issues before the ICD-10 transition deadline takes hold.


CMS will be conducting educational sessions about submitting ICD-10 claims prior to the final end-to-end testing session in July before the ICD-10 transition deadline takes effect on October 1. The federal agency continues to urge medical care providers to prepare for the coming ICD-10 implementation in order to avoid any reimbursement delays or rejections after the ICD-10 transition deadline.


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Direct Reimbursement Solutions's insight:

With only four months to go, it seems that ICD-10 testing is going very well. Good news for providers of care.

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6 PQRS Measures for Physical Therapy - Nancy Beckley & Associates

6 PQRS Measures for Physical Therapy - Nancy Beckley & Associates | Outsource your therapy billing successfully | Scoop.it
PQRS reporting is only for those physical therapists billing on the CMS 1500 form (rehab agencies, CORFs, SNF and hospital outpatient therapy providers are not eligible). Individual providers (in the group practice) must ...

Via John Yodonise
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Are you reporting your PQRS correctly?

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John Yodonise's curator insight, February 9, 2014 10:40 PM

There are changes to the 2014 PQRS measures, new measures have been added and some measures require an increase in reporting intervals so make sure you verify you are reporting PQRS correctly this year.

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Extra Physical Therapy Reduces Patient Length of Stay and Improves Functional Outcomes and Quality of Life in People With Acute or Subacute Conditions: A Systematic Review

ItArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Volume 92, Issue 9, Pages 1490-1500, September 2011, Authors:Casey L. Peiris, BPhys; Nicholas F.


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Always a better result.

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The Myths vs. the Facts Regarding ICD-10 - Medical Groups

The Myths vs. the Facts Regarding ICD-10 - Medical Groups | Outsource your therapy billing successfully | Scoop.it
The myths vs. the facts regarding ICD-10
Direct Reimbursement Solutions's insight:

Time to get ready for ICD-10

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