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Les Marines pakistanaises et omanaises renforcent leurs relations de partenariat (lutte contre la piraterie et autres sujets)

Les Marines pakistanaises et omanaises renforcent leurs relations de partenariat (lutte contre la piraterie et autres sujets) | Newsletter navale | Scoop.it

Muscat: Strong ties between Oman and Pakistan were highlighted at a reception held to welcome the Pakistani Navy frigate, PNS Aslan, which docked at the Sultan Qaboos Port recently.
"We underwent a series of bilateral exercises with the Royal Navy of Oman in conducting anti-piracy operations and other aspects," said Commodore Suhail Hammad, Commanding Officer of PNS Aslat.
The exercises covered the regions of the Sea of Oman, the Gulf of Aden and the Indian Ocean.
Captain Jamal Alam said that the strong relationship between Pakistan and the Sultanate was based on "respect, loyalty and trust."
"We aim to promote peace in the region. The ties between Pakistan Navy and Royal Navy of Oman have strengthened over the years and have now become strong," said Captain Jamal Alam, captain of PNS Aslan. "We have benefited from training and sharing of strategies with the Royal Navy of Oman," he added.
Pakistani Ambassador Ayaz Hussain also commented, "Oman and Pakistan have a very old and strong relationship."
PNS Aslat is a F-22P or Zulfiquar (Sword)-class frigate used for deployment to carry out anti piracy operations and to counter terrorists' missions.
The frigate is the fourth of its kind to be indigenously built by Karachi Shipyard and Engineering Works Limited whereas its predecessors PNS Zulfiquar, the leading ship, PNS Shamsheer and PNS Saif were built by China.
With a speed of up to 30 knots (55 kilometres per hour) and armed with the latest state of the art weaponry and sensors, PNS Aslat is a formidable force at sea and highly capable of operating under multiple threat environments.
PNS Aslat carries over 150 crew members and is armed with C-802 anti-ship missiles, FM-90 surface-to-air missiles, AK-176M main gun, Type 730B CIWS, ET-52C torpedo launchers and RDC-32 ASW rockets.  This makes it an ideal ship to be inducted with the Tariq-class destroyers to use its capabilities to further strengthen and defend the sea frontiers.

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L'opération Atalante de l'Union Européenne contre la piraterie maritime en Océan Indien prolongée jusqu'en 2016

L'opération Atalante de l'Union Européenne contre la piraterie maritime en Océan Indien prolongée jusqu'en 2016 | Newsletter navale | Scoop.it

The Council has extended the EU’s counter-piracy Operation Atalanta by two more years, until 12 December 2016.

The Operation’s main focus is the protection of World Food Programme vessels delivering humanitarian aid to Somalia; and the deterrence, repression and disruption of piracy off the Somali coast. In addition, Operation Atalanta contributes to the monitoring of fishing activities off the coast of Somalia.

Despite the significant progress that has been achieved off the coast of Somalia since the operation was launched in 2008, it is widely recognised that the threat from piracy remains; the pirate business model is fractured but not broken. The Council has therefore added certain secondary tasks to the Operation’s mandate. EU Naval Force will now contribute, within existing means and capabilities, more widely to the EU’s comprehensive approach to Somalia, including in support of the EU Special Representative for the Horn of Africa. It will also be able to contribute to other relevant international community activities helping to address the root causes of piracy in Somalia.

In this respect, the operation could, for example, provide logistical support, expertise or training at sea for other EU actors, in particular the EU mission on regional maritime capacity building (EUCAP NESTOR). In addition, Operation Atalanta can also support the EU Training Mission (EUTM) Somalia.

EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Federica Mogherini said:

EU Operation Atalanta has considerably helped in reducing piracy off the Somali coast. We must maintain the pressure on pirates to help ensuring security in the Horn of Africa. This is in our mutual interest.

The EU Naval Force will now also contribute to addressing the root causes of piracy.

The common costs of EU Naval Force for the two years 2015 and 2016 are estimated at €14.7 million. The operation is currently commanded by Major General Martin Smith MBE of the UK Royal Marines. Together with 21 EU member states, two non-EU countries currently contribute to Operation Atalanta.

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La Marine chinoise cherche à développer des coopérations avec certains pays pour construire des bases navales en Océan Indien

La Marine chinoise cherche à développer des coopérations avec certains pays pour construire des bases navales en Océan Indien | Newsletter navale | Scoop.it

BEIJING, -- After a Chinese submarine and warships visited Sri Lanka, Iran and Pakistan, the Tokyo-based Yomiuri Shimbun on Sept. 27 reported that the People's Liberation Army Navy is seeking to construct naval ports in the Indian Ocean to monitor the movements of the Indian Navy.

Between Sept. 7-14, a Type 039 Song-class diesel-electric submarine anchored at Colombo in Sri Lanka to take on supplies. It is the first time a Chinese submarine has been sent publicly to a port near the Indian Ocean. The visit of Chinese president Xi Jinping to Sri Lanka after the submarine appeared also indicated that Beijing is strengthening its partnership with Sri Lanka. After its stay at Colmbo, the submarine moved on to the Gulf of Aden, according to the PLA Navy.

The Changchun, a Type 052C guided-missile destroyer, and the Changzhou, a Type 054A guided-missile frigate, also launched joint naval exercises with the Iranian and Pakistan navies during their visit to Bandar Abbas and Karachi. Those drills indicated that China is trying to expand its influence into the region through transforming the PLA Navy into a genuine blue-water navy.

The paper said that China is discussing maritime cooperation with the Seychelles, Mauritius, the Maldives, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Cambodia. Admiral Robin K Dhowan, India's chief of naval staff, said China is apparently seeking allies to encircle India. Dhowan said that the Indian navy will pay close attention to Chinese expansion in the region. If China begins to increase its naval activities in the Indian Ocean, it is likely to become a serious challenge to India, Dhowan said.

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Asie(s)'s curator insight, October 8, 2014 8:04 AM

Collier de perles...

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Les sociétés de sécurité maritime sont contraintes à se diversifier en raison des évolutions récentes dans le domaine de la piraterie

Les sociétés de sécurité maritime sont contraintes à se diversifier en raison des évolutions récentes dans le domaine de la piraterie | Newsletter navale | Scoop.it

Cash-strapped maritime security firms are being forced to use fewer costly elite guards and to diversify into other businesses such as cyber security, as a steep decline in Somali pirate attacks and hotter competition erode fast-thinning margins.

Hundreds of security firms sprang up over the past seven years to offer protection to shipping companies, with scores of merchant vessels being boarded and sailors taken hostage in pirate raids off the coast of conflict-torn Somalia.

However, attacks in the Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean have dropped from a peak of 237 in 2011 to just 10 in the first nine months of this year, the lowest since the piracy scourge began in 2008, according to the International Maritime Bureau.

The fall has been helped by using armed guards, deploying naval forces and defending ships with barbed wire or fire hoses.

The cost of using guards has also halved as the sector has become more competitive, which though good for ship owners is bad for security firms.

“Day rates for embarked teams are continuously being squeezed to rock bottom,” said retired rear admiral Vasilis Politis, managing director of Greek armed guard company Marine Security International.

The price for a security team to protect a ship has slumped from an average of $40,000 (£25,502) per voyage to around $18,000-$20,000, said Gerry Northwood, who previously commanded the British Royal Navy’s Counter Piracy Task Group which detained 13 Somalis after an attack on a tanker in 2012.

A typical team comprises three or four guards, working round the clock and armed with semi-automatic weapons to maximise fire power and rifles for accuracy and range.

Faced with a tougher operating environment, some firms have switched from using former U.S. and British marines and special forces to cheaper alternatives including guards from India, the Philippines and Estonia, said Ian May, Asia manager for Protection Vessels International.

Declining revenue has encouraged industry consolidation. Ambrey Risk, one of the biggest firms, bought the maritime security division of rival Drum Cussac this month, while Gulf of Aden Group Transits shut in July.

Peter Cook, chief executive of the Security Association for the Maritime Industry (SAMI), said its membership had fallen from a high of 180 companies in November 2012 to 140, and he anticipated further falls.

NEW BUSINESSES

Companies are trying to expand into new areas including cyber security for ships and the offshore industry, port security and training coast guards.

Some are also offering protection in areas where piracy has increased such as West Africa, with 23 attacks recorded up to September this year, and Asia, where almost 100 attacks were reported in the waters off Singapore, Indonesia and Malaysia.

However, restrictions on privately contracted armed guards in West Africa and the low level of violence normally used in attacks in Southeast Asia mean firms cannot necessarily replicate their Indian Ocean operations, said Mark Thomas, Asia Pacific business development manager at Dryad Maritime in Singapore.

Despite the drop in attacks, the Gulf of Aden still remains vital for the security business, with a fifth of global trade passing through it and at least 40 per cent of ships transiting the area had armed guards in July, according to SAMI.

Former British naval captain Northwood, who is chief operating officer at Maritime Asset Security and Training, said there were still probably two or three cases of Somali pirate boats probing the defences of ships a month.

For now, naval patrols are set to continue. The European Union expects to extend its anti-piracy operations for another year and NATO is extending its to the end of 2016.

“If companies stop using armed guards and the naval presence disappears then we would not have to wait for too long for another wave of successful attacks,” said Madis Madalik, chief operating officer of Estonian-based ESC Global Security.
Source: Reuters (Editing by Henning Gloystein and Ed Davies)

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La Chine envisagerait d'investir dans la construction de 18 bases navales dans différents pays de l'Océan Indien

La Chine envisagerait d'investir dans la construction de 18 bases navales dans différents pays de l'Océan Indien | Newsletter navale | Scoop.it

The Namibian, citing reports in the Chinese media has stated that China is planning to establish 18 naval bases in strategic locations that included the Hambantota Port in Sri Lanka.

Another one of these naval bases is due to be established in the Walvis Bay in Namibia and this was confirmed to The Namibian newspaper by Namibian Ministry of Defence spokesperson Lieutenant-Colonel Monica Sheya.

The Namibian has stated that China plans to build replenishment, berthing and maintenance bases in foreign countries through mutually beneficial and friendly consultations.

Following is the story published in The Namibian:

DISCUSSIONS are under way at the ‘highest levels’ regarding plans by the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Navy to build a base at Walvis Bay in the next 10 years.

According to reports in the Chinese media, Walvis Bay will be one of 18 naval bases that will be established in various regions: Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Mynanmar in the northern Indian Ocean; Djibouti, Yemen, Oman, Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique in the western Indian Ocean; and Seychelles and Madagascar in the central South Indian Ocean.

“These three strategic lines will further enhance China’s effectiveness in taking responsibility for maintaining the safety of international maritime routes thereby maintaining regional and world stability,” the media reports said.

Other naval bases are: Chongjin Port (North Korea), Moresby Port (Papua New Guinea), Sihanoukville Port (Cambodia), Koh Lanta Port (Thailand) Sittwe Port (Myanmar), Dhaka Port (Bangladesh), Gwadar Port (Pakistan), Hambantota Port (Sri Lanka), Maldives, Seychelles, Djibouti Port (Djibouti),

Lagos Port (Nigeria), Mombasa Port (Kenya), Dar es Salaam Port (Tanzania) and Luanda Port (Angola).

Ministry of Defence spokesperson Lieutenant-Colonel Monica Sheya confirmed these reports to The Namibian yesterday, saying that once a decision is made, the ministry will inform the nation.

“We have read about it. I believe it is being discussed at the higher levels, but that’s all I can say now. Once a decision has been made, we will be sure to inform the nation about it, but we cannot say more yet,” Sheya said.

China plans to build replenishment, berthing and maintenance bases in foreign countries through mutually beneficial and friendly consultations. Furthermore, the reports state that the Chinese navy will not establish “US-style” military bases, yet it will not exclude the establishment of a number of so-called ‘Overseas Strategic Support Bases’ in accordance with prevailing international rules.

China has several major infrastructure development and resource extraction interests in Namibia. It also has a satellite tracking station near Swakopmund.

The decision for strengthening China’s national armed forces in line with the country’s international standing to meet the needs of its security and development interests, was taken at the Chinese Communist Party congress.

China’s navy boasts of a personnel strength of 255 000 servicemen and women, including 10 000 marines and 26 000 naval air force personnel. It is the second largest navy in the world in terms of tonnage, behind only the United States Navy, and has the largest number of major combatants of any navy.

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Asie(s)'s curator insight, November 24, 2014 1:40 PM

China's earl knecklace...