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Mise en chantier chez DSME du 1er futur sous-marin type KSS-III (Jangbogo III) pour la Marine sud-coréenne

Mise en chantier chez DSME du 1er futur sous-marin type KSS-III (Jangbogo III) pour la Marine sud-coréenne | Newsletter navale | Scoop.it

Under the Jangbogo III programme, the first submarine is due to be launched in 2018 and handed over to the Republic of Korea Navy at the end of 2020 following two years of sea trials. The second submarine will be delivered at the end of 2022. KSS-III is expected to be produced in three batches:
Batch-I consists in the first two hulls to be built by DSME.
Batch-II will consist in three hulls built by HHI (Huyndai Heavy Industries). They will be fitted with a greater deal of South Korean technology.
Batch-III will consists in the four remaining hulls (for a total of nine KSS-III submarines across all batches). The last submarine is expected to be delivered in 2029.
The original design of the submarine includes 6x VLS (vertical launch system) tubes. They would accomodate a future cruise missile in development by LIG Nex1 while the launchers would be provided by Doosan. It was announced earlier this year that Spanish company INDRA was selected to provide its electronic defense system (ESM) PEGASO and Babcock of the UK would design and manufacture the Weapon Handling System for the Batch-I submarine.
It was officialy announced during Euronaval 2014 that Sagem would supply the optronic masts for the class. Navy Recogition learned in september from a source that Thales would supply sonar systems for the class. However it appears that flank array sonars will actually be provided by Korean company LIG Nex1. LIG will also supply KSS-III's combat management system. The submarine will be fitted with south korean lithium-ion battery technology.

Detailed specifications of KSS-III (Jangbogo 3) Batch-I:
Full-length 83.5m
Beam 9.6m
Pressure sensor diameter 7.7m
Draught 7.62m
Crew: 50 sailors
M aximum speed: 20 knots
Cruising range" 10,000 nm
Surface tonnage: 3358 tons
Submerged tonnage: 3705 tons

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Sagem va équiper les futurs sous-marins sud-coréens KSS-III (construits par DSME) en mâts optroniques

Sagem va équiper les futurs sous-marins sud-coréens KSS-III (construits par DSME) en mâts optroniques | Newsletter navale | Scoop.it

Euronaval 2014 Paris October, 27 2014 - Following an international request for proposals, Sagem (Safran) has signed a contract with Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co. Ltd (DSME) of South Korea, to supply the optronic surveillance masts for the country’s new submarines.
The selection of Sagem was made by a commission comprising members from the South Korean navy, DAPA (Defense Acquisition Program Administration), ADD (Agency for Defense Development) and DSME. The decisive factors in this decision were the best world-class competitiveness and performance level offered by Sagem’s optronic masts, especially in terms of image resolution and processing, and their easy integration in the ship’s combat suite.
This latest contract emphasizes the outstanding collaboration between South Korean industry and Sagem. Sagem’s new generation of optronic masts, which do not penetrate the thick hull, feature low-observability and radar stealth. In addition to the optronic (electro-optical) sensors from Sagem, they also include a signal intelligence system, and an infrared system for discreet communications.
The future optronic surveillance mast is derived from Sagem’s Series 30 masts already in production for the Scorpène class submarines built by French naval shipyard DCNS for international markets, and for the future Suffren class nuclear attack submarines in the French navy’s Barracuda program.
Sagem develops and produces for its partners a complete family of optronic masts and attack periscopes, electronic warfare equipment and radars for submarines.
The masts will be integrated at Sagem’s plant in Dijon and the infrared imagers in Poitiers.

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