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Content Curation for Education and Learning: Robin Good @Emerge2012 Presentation-Map

Content Curation for Education and Learning: Robin Good @Emerge2012 Presentation-Map | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it

Robin Good: I believe that content curation will play a very important role in the future of education and learning and this presentation-map focuses on this topic.

I have identified at least ten reasons that are transforming and weakening the education-certification system as it is now, and may rapidly give way to new ways of teaching, learning and getting certified which will likely involve a great deal of curation (both for those who teach/guide and those who want to learn).

 

In this presentation-map I am introducing the concept of curation for education, the key factors that I see are transforming traditional academic institutions and the learning industry in general, and the tools, resources and examples that are relevant to those working in these fields and wanting to find out more.

 

As part of my workshop session during the emerge2012 conference in which I have first presented these ideas, I have also created an "open", collaborative wiki-map where, you are welcome to contribute inspiring curated collections. You will find instructions on how to contribute to it at the end of this presentation.

Full presentation-map: http://www.mindomo.com/mindmap/content-curation-for-education-and-learning-robin-good-emerge2012-98ccaad217074a07b9bff8b76effab8e

 

"What is content curation in the context of education and why it is going to be so relevant in the near future. Benefits of content curation, examples and tools."


Emerge2012 Conference

 

 


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Rescooped by Thomas Faltin from Content Curation World
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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"

 

"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.


Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."

 

This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.

 

And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"

 

What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)

 

 

Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10

 

Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/

 

(Image credit: Behance.net)

 

 


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Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?

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Content Curation and the Future of Campus Bookstores by Daniel W. Rasmus

Content Curation and the Future of Campus Bookstores by Daniel W. Rasmus | Digital-News on Scoop.it today | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Daniel W. Rasmus has an interesting article on his blog entitled: "The Future of Campus Stores: Good-Bye Books, Hello Learning". In it he analyzes the key elements that will help such campus stores maintain their relevancy while traditional textbooks are rapidly loosing thir foothold inside academic campuses.

 

He writes: "College bookstores face an existential crisis with the looming demise of physical book sales as digital technology rapidly becomes an option for learners.

 

At the same time free content, via websites like the Kahn Academy, or through more proprietary means, like Apple’s iTunes University (now iTunes U).

 

And then there is the rise of open sourced content available places like the Open Education Resources Commons (OER).

 

So what should college stores consider as the elements that will help make them relevant as their core mission apparently shifts?"

 

And one of the key elements that he sees potentially providing new

meaning and relevance to campus bookstores, as a knowledge service, is content curation.

 

"One specific instance of high-quality, knowledge-based service is content curation.

 

As the content world becomes more complex, the college store can offer value added resources to faculty and students to help them understand the options they have, and the relative value of different sources of information and approaches to the delivery of that information.

 

Think about content now as software. The educator can write a specification or requirements document and the store team, like programmers, can assemble a solution for the educator that meets his or her specification. Like programmers, the language or technique doesn’t matter to the solution recipient, what matters is that the software meets the requirements and delivers its expected value."

 

Insightful. Forward-looking. 8/10

 

Full article: http://danielwrasmus.com/the-future-of-campus-stores-good-bye-books-hello-learning/

 

 


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