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Data Encryption Is Key for Protecting Patient Data

Data Encryption Is Key for Protecting Patient Data | Networks & Data | Scoop.it

According to the HIPAA Final Omnibus Rule, section 164.304 sets forth the following definition: "Encryption means the use of an algorithmic process to transform data into a form in which there is a low probability of assigning meaning without use of a confidential process or key." Although encryption is considered an "addressable" issue, and not "required" or "standard," it really should be accounted for as "required." But why? Encrypting mobile devices, laptops, hard drives, servers, and electronic media (e.g., UBS drives and CD-ROMs) can prevent the practice from paying a large fine for a HIPAA breach.

 

As a reminder, both Concentra and QCA Health Plan paid over $2 million in combined fines to the Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights. The "investigation revealed that Concentra had previously recognized in multiple risk analyses that a lack of encryption on its laptops, desktop computers, medical equipment, tablets and other devices containing electronic protected health information (PHI) was a critical risk," the Office for Civil Rights said. "While steps were taken to begin encryption, Concentra's efforts were incomplete and inconsistent over time, leaving patient PHI vulnerable throughout the organization. OCR's investigation further found Concentra had insufficient security-management processes in place to safeguard patient information."

The problems with not encrypting data and failing to conform to the other requirements associated with HIPAA and the HITECH Act can have further reaching consequences. According to a recent article by Absolute Software, "Protected health information is becoming increasingly attractive to cybercriminals with health records fetching more than credit card information on the black market. According to Forrester, a single health record can sell for $20 on the black market while a complete patient dossier with driver's license, health insurance information, and other sensitive data can sell for $500."

Any physician who has had their DEA number compromised or been involved in a government investigation involving Medicare fraud knows firsthand about the importance of implementing adequate security measures and internal audits. Investing in encryption is one way to mitigate financial, reputational, and legal liability.

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Justin Boersma's insight:

Data encryption is vital in the protection of private consumer data collected by companies, especially medical records. Innovation in data encryption is required to prevent breaches of sensitive information as The Information Age grows in the coming years.

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Rescooped by Justin Boersma from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
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Quantum storage breakthrough key to 'unbreakable' encryption | Leon Spencer | ZDNet

Quantum storage breakthrough key to 'unbreakable' encryption | Leon Spencer | ZDNet | Networks & Data | Scoop.it

Researchers at the Australian National University (ANU) believe that the development of a quantum hard drive that can store data for up to six hours is a major step towards a secure worldwide data encryption network based on quantum entanglement.

Scientists from ANU and New Zealand's University of Otago have jointly developed an optical quantum hard drive constructed of atoms of rare earth element europium embedded in a crystal.

 

The solid-state drive employs quantum entanglement -- in which pairs of particles exist in linked states -- to store data.

 

Quantum entanglement has long been held up as a holy grail for the development of super-fast computers that rely on qubits rather than traditional binary data, but the entangled state of particles used to store data has traditionally been difficult to maintain for any usable length of time.

 

"Quantum states are very fragile and normally collapse in milliseconds," said the ANU Research School of Physics and Engineering's Manjin Zhong, who is also the lead author of an article on the research published by science journal Nature.

 

The research conducted by the team of researchers in Australia and New Zealand demonstrated six-hour quantum storage using the prototype optical drive.

 

Zhong said that the quantum storage breakthrough demonstrated by the team could not only provide new data storage opportunities, but could also be used to "perfectly secure encryption for data transmission".

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Justin Boersma's insight:

Quantum encryption may prove to be unbreakable security for vital data, an important factor in the Information Age. Once quantum mechanics research furthers to the point of longer term storage, quantum encryption will play an important role in extremely sensitive information, e.g. corporate / government secrets, military communications, etc.

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Rescooped by Justin Boersma from Future of Cloud Computing, IoT and Software Market
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What is Cloud Backup and why should you go for it

What is Cloud Backup and why should you go for it | Networks & Data | Scoop.it
As the term itself suggests, cloud backup is nothing but backing up your resources and saving it to cloud. Cloud backup improves efficiency and decreases

Via EMC Education Services, massimo facchinetti
Justin Boersma's insight:

Cloud Backup is going to play a vital role in our lives, as data becomes vital to our day-to-day life and our quality of life. In the future, as our own data grows, we will need a secure place to store it, however maintaining a system that is easily capable of upgrading capacity isn't cost effective for many companies and individuals, which is where Cloud Backup comes into play.

viky panjwani's curator insight, March 26, 2015 12:10 AM

cloud computing is the future of storage and computing .Wide use f cloud computing expecting to grow more in next few years.It is developing very fast.

Rescooped by Justin Boersma from HIPAA Compliance for Medical Practices
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Data Encryption Is Key for Protecting Patient Data

Data Encryption Is Key for Protecting Patient Data | Networks & Data | Scoop.it

According to the HIPAA Final Omnibus Rule, section 164.304 sets forth the following definition: "Encryption means the use of an algorithmic process to transform data into a form in which there is a low probability of assigning meaning without use of a confidential process or key." Although encryption is considered an "addressable" issue, and not "required" or "standard," it really should be accounted for as "required." But why? Encrypting mobile devices, laptops, hard drives, servers, and electronic media (e.g., UBS drives and CD-ROMs) can prevent the practice from paying a large fine for a HIPAA breach.

 

As a reminder, both Concentra and QCA Health Plan paid over $2 million in combined fines to the Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights. The "investigation revealed that Concentra had previously recognized in multiple risk analyses that a lack of encryption on its laptops, desktop computers, medical equipment, tablets and other devices containing electronic protected health information (PHI) was a critical risk," the Office for Civil Rights said. "While steps were taken to begin encryption, Concentra's efforts were incomplete and inconsistent over time, leaving patient PHI vulnerable throughout the organization. OCR's investigation further found Concentra had insufficient security-management processes in place to safeguard patient information."

The problems with not encrypting data and failing to conform to the other requirements associated with HIPAA and the HITECH Act can have further reaching consequences. According to a recent article by Absolute Software, "Protected health information is becoming increasingly attractive to cybercriminals with health records fetching more than credit card information on the black market. According to Forrester, a single health record can sell for $20 on the black market while a complete patient dossier with driver's license, health insurance information, and other sensitive data can sell for $500."

Any physician who has had their DEA number compromised or been involved in a government investigation involving Medicare fraud knows firsthand about the importance of implementing adequate security measures and internal audits. Investing in encryption is one way to mitigate financial, reputational, and legal liability.

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Justin Boersma's insight:

Data encryption is vital in the protection of private consumer data collected by companies, especially medical records. Innovation in data encryption is required to prevent breaches of sensitive information as The Information Age grows in the coming years.

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Justin Boersma from Amazing Science
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First Teleportation from One Macroscopic Object to Another 150 Meters Away

First Teleportation from One Macroscopic Object to Another 150 Meters Away | Networks & Data | Scoop.it

Physicists have teleported quantum information from one ensemble of atoms to another 150 metres away, a demonstration that paves the way towards quantum routers and a quantum Internet.

 

Technologies behind a quantum internet will be quantum routers capable of transmitting quantum information from one location to another without destroying it. That's no easy task. Quantum bits or qubits are famously fragile—a single measurement destroys them. So it's not all obvious how macroscopic objects such as routers in a fibre optics network can handle qubits without demolishing them.

However, physicists have a trick up their sleeve to help send qubits safely. This trick is teleportation, a standard tool in any decent quantum optics lab.

 

It relies on the strange phenomenon of entanglement in which two quantum objects share the same existence. That link ensures that no matter how far apart they are, a measurement on one particle instantly influences the other. It is this 'influence' that allows physicists to transmit quantum information from one point in space to another without it passing through the space in between.

 

Of course, teleportation is tricky, but physicists are getting better at it. They've teleported quantum information from one photon to another, from ions to photons and even from a macroscopic ensemble of atoms to a photon. Now Xiao-Hui Bao at the University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei and a few buddies say they've added a new and important technique to this box of tricks.

These guys have teleported quantum information from ensemble of rubidium atoms to another ensemble of rubidium atoms over a distance of 150 metres using entangled photons. That's the first time that anybody has performed teleportation from one macroscopic object to another.

 

“This is interesting as the first teleportation between two macroscopic-sized objects at a distance of macroscopic scale,” say Xiao-Hui and co. Quite right. The goal in a quantum internet is that ensembles of atoms will sit at the heart of quantum routers, receiving quantum information from incoming photons and then generating photons that pass this information on to the next router. So clearly the first teleportation from one of these hearts to another is an important advance.

 

Of course, there are hurdles ahead. Xiao-Hui and co want to increase the probability of success for each instance of teleportation, to increase the amount of time that the atomic ensemble can store quantum information before it leaks away (currently just over 100 microseconds) and to create a chain of atomic ensembles that will better demonstrate the potential of the technique for quantum routing. None of those challenges seem like showstoppers. Which means that practical quantum routers and the quantum internet that relies on them are just around the corner.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Justin Boersma's insight:

Incorporating quantum mechanics into data transmittance, one which yet requires a lot of research, can potentially allow for instantaneous transference of data, regardless of distance. Improving speeds of data transference will be vital as computers become more efficient, and file sizes grow to fully utilise the potential.

 

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Why DNA could be the future of data storage

Why DNA could be the future of data storage | Networks & Data | Scoop.it
Researchers at ETH Zurich, in Switzerland, believe that fossilized DNA may hold the key to preserving huge amounts of data for millenia.

Via Paulo Gervasio
Justin Boersma's insight:

The potential DNA holds for data storage solutions is incredible, and will be required as the need for mass storage increases over time. Utilising DNA for data storage also preserves the data much longer than the typical 4~year lifespan of a hard drive, whilst DNA has the possibility of preserving data to be readable for a million years, much like fossils have been preserved.

 

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Rescooped by Justin Boersma from leapmind
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Wearables In Business: Intensified Security And Privacy Concerns

Wearables In Business: Intensified Security And Privacy Concerns | Networks & Data | Scoop.it

Consumers may be giddy about the Apple Watch and the augmented reality possibilities of smartglasses. But if you really want to see wearable tech in action … you need to go to work. Wearables are o...


Via LeapMind
Justin Boersma's insight:

The incorporation of wearable technology will provoke increased efforts into improving battery life, or possibly effective wireless energy. Innovations in WiFi connectivity will be required, as many environments will house disruptive signals from machines already in place.

Thomas Blake's curator insight, March 27, 2015 1:38 AM

Wearables are a type of technology that people wear on their body. Most commonly these are devices such as smart watches or Google Glass. Although these devices may greatly improve the way that we consume media and interact with one another they have brought up a multitude of privacy issues from data leaks to stalking. Wearables are one example of technology that is being suppressed in development due to social and political issues. However if these devices can be regulated and controlled they could revolutionise industry and civilian life.

Rescooped by Justin Boersma from Future of Cloud Computing, IoT and Software Market
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6 Telecommunications Disruptions for 2020 | HP

6 Telecommunications Disruptions for 2020 | HP | Networks & Data | Scoop.it
Content Barons, Smart Dust & SkyNet: 6 Telecommunications Disruptions for 2020 | HP In coming up with this list of predictions for Telecommunications, I wanted to focus upon external factors that will drive the industry. Technical innovation will continue to be critical to the industry; however, there are many external forces that will significantly impact how this industry will evolve over the next five years.

Via massimo facchinetti
Justin Boersma's insight:

As technology shrinks, their mobility increases, and their integration into our lives. However, with this increase of devices and their need of connectivity, current routers will see needed upgrade to accommodate increased bandwidth needs.

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Drowning In Big Data - Finding Insight In A Digital Sea Of Information

Drowning In Big Data - Finding Insight In A Digital Sea Of Information | Networks & Data | Scoop.it
Big data is useful for large corporations and rocket scientists, but what about the rest of us?
Justin Boersma's insight:

In the Information Age, data swamps companies and governments, collecting too much to be of much use. As the data grows exponentially with the increase of global internet connectivity, more and more powerful processors will be developed to handle such large quantities of data.

Gillian Dummermuth's curator insight, March 28, 2015 4:23 AM

Big Data - digital information we (I) dont tend to think about

Rescooped by Justin Boersma from Amazing Science
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Elon Musk reveals plan to put internet connectivity in space

Elon Musk reveals plan to put internet connectivity in space | Networks & Data | Scoop.it

At the SpaceX event held in Seattle, Elon Musk revealed his grand (and expensive) $10 billion plan to build internet connectivity in space. Musk’s vision wants to radically change the way we access internet. His plan includes putting satellites in space, between which data packets would bounce around before being passed down to Earth. Right now, data packets bounce about the various networks via routers.


Some say that Elon Musk’s ambitious project would enable a Smartphone to access the internet just like it communicates with GPS satellites. SpaceX will launch its satellites in a low orbit, so as to reduce communication lag. While geosynchronous communication satellites orbit the Earth from an altitude of 22,000 miles, SpaceX’s satellites would be orbiting the Earth from an altitude of 750 miles.

 

Once Musk’s system is in place, data packets would simply be sent to space, from where they would bounce about the satellites, and ultimately be sent back to Earth. “The speed of light is 40 percent faster in the vacuum of space than it is for fiber,” says Musk, which is why he believes that his unnamed SpaceX venture is the future of internet connectivity, replacing traditional routers and networks.


The project is based out of SpaceX’s new Seattle office. It will initially start out with 60 workers, but Musk predicts that the workforce may grow to over 1,000 in three to four years. Musk wants “the best engineers that either live in Seattle or that want to move to the Seattle area and work on electronics, software, structures, and power systems,” to work with SpaceX.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Justin Boersma's insight:

Global internet connectivity through Low Earth Orbit satellites can prove to be incredibly useful and revolutionise the way certain information may travel, e.g. designate specific types of data to be transmitted only through this network of satellites. This would overall increase connectivity and speed across the globe, and most likely require an overhaul of current networking hardware.

JebaQpt's comment, January 21, 2015 11:21 PM
Elon Musk quotes http://www.thequotes.net/2014/10/elon-musk-quotes/
Rescooped by Justin Boersma from Amazing Science
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Ultrafast magnetization reversal driven by femtosecond laser pulses for superfast and precise data storage

Ultrafast magnetization reversal driven by femtosecond laser pulses for superfast and precise data storage | Networks & Data | Scoop.it

Ultrafast magnetization reversal driven by femtosecond laser pulses has been shown to be a promising way to write information. Scientists are still seeking to improve the recording density has raised intriguing fundamental questions about the feasibility of combining ultrafast temporal resolution with sub-wavelength spatial resolution for magnetic recording. Now a team of researchers reports on the experimental demonstration of nanoscale sub-100 ps all-optical magnetization switching, providing a path to sub-wavelength magnetic recording. Using computational methods, they reveal the feasibility of nanoscale magnetic switching even for an unfocused laser pulse. This effect is achieved by structuring the sample such that the laser pulse, via both refraction and interference, focuses onto a localized region of the structure, the position of which can be controlled by the structural design. Time-resolved photo-emission electron microscopy studies reveal that nanoscale magnetic switching employing such focusing can be pushed to the sub-100 ps regime.


Prof. Theo Rasing of Radboud University says: ‘Since our group in Nijmegen discovered that femtosecond laser pulses are able to reverse magnetization, we started to work on how to minimize the size of the switched domain. You can in principle follow two approaches: make the structures smaller or focus the light to a smaller spot. By structuring the materials we discovered indeed that you can achieve sub-wavelength switching even on much larger structures. By controlling the laser pulse, this can be done in a controlled way. The ability to detect magnetic changes with sub-100 nm resolution was crucial for the whole project. Our collaborations through EU-networks with the main synchrotrons in Europe therefore played a decisive role for the success of this project.’


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Justin Boersma's insight:

Improving reading & writing speeds of data increases the work efficiency of individuals, and therefore improving an organisation's output per employee. Such innovations will allow for software developers to utilise larger files in processing, especially in rendering and processing.

 

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Rescooped by Justin Boersma from Cloud Central
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Hybrid cloud storage: What data goes where?

Hybrid cloud storage: What data goes where? | Networks & Data | Scoop.it
Hybrid cloud storage keeps some data on-site while the rest goes to the cloud. But, what data should go where in a hybrid cloud setup? It’s all about data classification and risk

Via Peter Azzopardi
Justin Boersma's insight:

With the increasing developments in data transference, cloud storage and hybrid-cloud storage is increasing in validity, efficiency and effectiveness. It is important for organisations and individuals to understand the impact of utilising cloud storage - questions of data security are raised, especially in light of recent infamous scandal of cloud storage involving Apple.

Peter Azzopardi's curator insight, January 25, 2014 5:29 PM

Hybrid cloud offers the best of both worlds by combining on-site data storage with public cloud storage provision.

Sire Erik-Andreas Bernard's curator insight, March 27, 2015 6:27 AM

3rd most important technology: Data/Cloud
The "cloud" is an internet based storage base that is used to process and store data collected by user. It is a cheaper alternative to physical storage and might soon takeover it all together. It does currently have some kinks that should be seen sorted in the next few years leaving it almost flawless.