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Information on Needlestick and other sharps injuries
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Winneshiek County landfill bans medical sharps in safety move

Winneshiek County landfill bans medical sharps in safety move | Needlestick | Scoop.it
The county's ban on sharp objects went into effect January 1, 2019.
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BD

BD | Needlestick | Scoop.it
Healthcare workers protect our lives, but they need protection too. Needlestick injuries represent a major hazard for healthcare workers in hospitals, clinics and everywhere they operate.
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State of needlestick training for undergraduate medical students

State of needlestick training for undergraduate medical students | Needlestick | Scoop.it
The State of Needlestick Training for Undergraduate Medical Students at Canadian Universities in Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada...
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Needlestick and Sharps Injuries – The importance of quick treatment

Needlestick and Sharps Injuries – The importance of quick treatment | Needlestick | Scoop.it
If you have been injured by a needle or sharp, you should always seek medical treatment straight away. In this article we discuss what to do if you have suffered an injury, and why these injuries can be life changing.
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New Jersey Hospital HIV and Hepatitis Scare: Here Are the Facts

New Jersey Hospital HIV and Hepatitis Scare: Here Are the Facts | Needlestick | Scoop.it
A New Jersey outpatient surgery center may have exposed more than 3,700 patients to HIV and hepatitis due to unsanitary conditions.
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Sarah Phillips on LinkedIn: ""53% reported that their institution lacks needlestick training, and 35% were unsure whether their institution provides reporting instruction” During our Vein Training ...

Sarah Phillips on LinkedIn: ""53% reported that their institution lacks needlestick training, and 35% were unsure whether their institution provides reporting instruction” During our Vein Training ... | Needlestick | Scoop.it
December 20, 2018: Sarah Phillips posted an article on LinkedIn...
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Inmate Hepatitis

The team provides a midday report on news events in the Low Country area of South Carolina and provides updates on sports, entertainment and weather.
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Woman tests positive for hepatitis B after New Jersey surgery center alerts thousands of potential exposure

Woman tests positive for hepatitis B after New Jersey surgery center alerts thousands of potential exposure | Needlestick | Scoop.it
The 58-year-old Brooklyn woman, who asked to remain anonymous for privacy reasons, underwent shoulder surgery at the HealthPlus Surgery Center in August...
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Starbucks installing drug needle disposal boxes so that all the heroin addicts who “live” in their public restrooms can toss their needle waste “safely” –

Starbucks installing drug needle disposal boxes so that all the heroin addicts who “live” in their public restrooms can toss their needle waste “safely” – | Needlestick | Scoop.it
Ever since Starbucks Coffee Company decided it would be a good idea to turn all of its stores into public restrooms for homeless people and junkies, used needles and other dangerous drug paraphernalia are becoming problematic at many locations – so much so that Starbucks is now considering installin...
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Oxnard hospital fined for needle left in patient after surgery

Oxnard hospital fined for needle left in patient after surgery | Needlestick | Scoop.it
St. John's Regional Medical Center fined for needle left in patient after heart surgery Ventura County Star Published 11:00 AM EST Dec 19, 2018 St. John's Regional Medical Center, Oxnard TOM KISKEN/THE STAR A nearly 3-inch-long metal needle was left in a woman’s abdominal tissue during a 2014 open-heart surgery at St. John’s Regional Medical Center, triggering a $40,400 fine, state officials said this month. The needle broke just underneath the skin during a difficult operation that lasted several hours and involved dozens of needles and wires, said surgeon Dr. Bruce Toporoff. He described the incident as minor. But California Department of Public Health officials classified the error as carrying the potential to cause serious injury or death and said their first concern was to make sure such an incident doesn’t happen again. They said the needle was finally removed more than seven months after surgery when the patient came to St. John’s emergency room complaining of a burning pain. “She noticed a sharp object protruding from her abdomen when she bent forward,” an investigator wrote in a report. Officials said the doctor and the operating room staff didn’t follow policies that include accurate counts of surgical instruments and X-rays to make sure objects aren’t left in patients. St. John’s was one of seven hospitals penalized by the state for incidents regulators label as adverse events placing patients in immediate jeopardy. St. John’s in Oxnard was earlier fined for a 2015 surgery in which a heart lung machine malfunctioned. That penalty was announced in August. MORE: Massive merger involving St. John’s hospitals sows nurses’ anxiety Hospital officials responded to several questions about the foreign object incident with a written statement emphasizing that patient care and safety are the highest priorities. “We have conducted a thorough investigation and are working closely with the medical staff, patient care staff and hospital leadership, as well as with the California Department of Public Health to ensure that an incident like this does not happen again,” officials said. “Consistent with patient privacy laws and hospital policy, we respect our patients’ privacy by not discussing the specifics of their care.” State authorities said in their written report that a woman came to the hospital on Dec. 19, 2014, for surgery to replace her mitral and aortic valves. According to the state report, the surgeon used an external pacemaker in which wires are connected to the heart to deliver an electrical stimulus and ensure a healthy beat. The wires often temporarily remain in the patient after surgery, protruding from the chest. But a breakaway needle that is part of what is called a pacer wire is removed from the body. During the 2014 surgery, part of a needle broke off and was lost in abdominal tissue, according to the state report. MORE: State levies fines against St. John’s Regional, VCMC for alleged violations In a phone interview Friday, Toporoff said the surgery can last six hours and can involve as many as 150 needles. He said the broken needle incident happened midway during the procedure. “The lady was very obese. ... It (the needle) wasn’t long enough to come out of the skin and it broke off under the skin,” he said, noting that the object was lost in the tissue outside of the body’s cavity. In the report, an investigator wrote that Toporoff said he forgot the needle was still in the patient. The surgical instruments were counted in a safety procedure conducted after surgery and did not record the missing instrument. “I don’t think I used those words,” Toporoff said of forgetting the needle, confirming he was told by nurses all the surgical instruments had been removed. That’s why the missing needle wasn’t documented. But a nurse and a senior scrub technician told the investigator they knew a needle hadn’t been recovered. MORE: State agency OKs Dignity Health merger involving St. John's hospitals “Everyone knew one needle was still inside the patient,” the scrub tech told the investigator, according to the state report. “We started counting by saying, ‘one needle in the patient.’ That was needle number one.” Toporoff said the manner of the count meant it appeared all of the items had retrieved when they had not. He said nurses are responsible for the count. “If they tell me the count is correct, I’m moving on to other things,” he said. St. John’s officials didn’t answer questions about details of the incident, including the apparent miscommunication. The surgery was performed on Dec. 19, 2014. The patient came to the emergency room in pain on July 6, 2015. A CT scan revealed a 2.75 inch-long metallic wire, according to the report. It was removed from under the skin without complication. Toporoff called the removal procedure non-surgical, noting that the object had moved toward the skin’s surface. If the count during surgery had documented the missing needle, Toporoff said he probably would not have tried to retrieve it because that could have caused more damage. Instead, he would have told the patient and then followed up to make sure no problems developed. MORE: St. John's hospital workers get 13 percent raises over five years “It was a minor incident,” said Toporoff who left St. John’s in 2016 to move to New York. “It required no rehospitalization. The needle was not in the (body’s) cavity. It was an inert piece of metal.” But the state fine came via an administrative penalty program focused at errors with the potential to cause serious injury or death. “The hospital failed to ensure the health and safety of a patient,” state public health officials wrote in a news release. State officials said the findings of their investigation triggered concerns from the federal agency that administers Medicare and Medicaid. “The hospital had to immediately improve their internal processes to ensure improved safe health outcomes for patients, and the prevention of medical and surgical errors. The facility is back in compliance at this time,” state public health officials said. Actions taken by the hospital included adopting a policy for dealing with broken or malfunctioning instruments, according to the state report. Training and education sessions were conducted. MORE: St. John's hospitals, Anthem agree to last-minute deal on doctors Monitoring was performed to make sure surgical staff members followed the protocols.  State officials said the involvement of the federal Medicare agency is not unusual in adverse event and immediate jeopardy situations. The other six hospitals fined earlier this month include Kaiser’s Anaheim Medical Center, Kaweah Delta Medical Center in Visalia, Mercy Hospital in Bakersfield, Mercy Medical Center in Redding, Saint Agnes Medical Center in Fresno and Vibra Hospital of Sacramento.         Published 11:00 AM EST Dec 19, 2018
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A medical student delays reporting his needlestick. Here’s what he learned.

A medical student delays reporting his needlestick. Here’s what he learned. | Needlestick | Scoop.it
The field of medicine is not without risks.
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3,778 Patients At Medical Center Possibly Exposed To Hiv, Hepatitis

More than 3,000 patients who underwent procedures at a New Jersey surgery center during the first nine months of this year could have been exposed to HIV and...
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Envirx - Stay safe when using or handling needles and... | Facebook

Envirx - Stay safe when using or handling needles and... | Facebook | Needlestick | Scoop.it
Stay safe when using or handling needles and sharps! Here Are some safety tips from the National Safety Council #safety #health #medicalwaste #sharps...
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Patient tests positive for hepatitis C after New Jersey surgery center warns ...

https://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/ny-news-healthplus-hepatitis-c-20181230-story.html After a lapse in sterilization procedures may have exposed thous...
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MEDLOK™ Prevents 100% of Needle Stick Injuries (NSI)

Sta-Med is a developer and marketer of proprietary automatic safe needle assemblies, catheter securement devices and related products for sale to the medical...
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