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A Conversation With Zoe Keating: From Emily White's "How to Build a Sustainable Music Career and Collect All Revenue Streams"

A Conversation With Zoe Keating: From Emily White's "How to Build a Sustainable Music Career and Collect All Revenue Streams" | Women in The Music Industry | Scoop.it
Emily White has made a career out of helping independent creators as a manager, label owner and much more. She’s in the trenches with them every day. Fortunately, we are. Continue reading

Via midem
Bianca Mari's insight:
This article was VERY short, but I'm always looking for a great book to read to better my knowledge in this ever-changing industry. My dad always said, 'Obtaining it is the easy part, keeping it is the hard part.' There are many resources out there on how to start a music career but not too many that I know of to 'sustain' that said career.

The source is very reliable. You can get a great preview of the book on the link provided along with a detailed background on the author. The sight also provides a bunch of great sources. This source had the authority, objectivity, accuracy, and currency when using the 'Evaluating Sources' guide.

I haven't ready the book yet, but the article was very convincing. I would actually be interested in purchasing the book. I believe in my eyes that this has great potential to be a major resource for entry-level audio industry professionals.
Alanna Hayes's curator insight, May 25, 8:58 PM
Another article with Zoe Keating, but more so an interview to help build a sustainable career. A completely independent instrumental artist collecting her own revenue. This is important to all artists coming out into the world, so they can get bank and recognition for their talents too.
Dawn VanDam's curator insight, May 31, 11:11 AM

Emily White has made a career out of helping independent creators as a manager, label owner and much more. She’s in the trenches with them every day. Fortunately, we are. Continue reading

Jason Green's curator insight, July 26, 10:58 AM
Starting a career in the music industry can be very difficult to do , however having a game plan is the key. Knowing the business side is the most important part. This article does a good job of discussing having a manager, having a distribution plan and the importance of getting the business side of things squared aware first.  Many individuals just dive in to the music careers without taking time to focus on the business side and obligations and this can be a crucial mistake. 
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5 Expert Tips for Women on How to Become a DJ

5 Expert Tips for Women on How to Become a DJ | Women in The Music Industry | Scoop.it
Originally posted on https://www.womenonbusiness.com/5-expert-tips-for-women-on-how-to-become-a-dj/   Calling aspiring female disc jockeys to the dance floor; your talents are needed. Female DJs are rare but powerful and inspirational in the music industry. Women everywhere are turning their passion into their paycheck. You can discover how to join them and shatter the glass ceiling when you drop the bass. If you daydream of becoming one of the main types  of disc jockeys, you’ve come to the right place. Read these five expert tips for women on how to become a DJ. 1. Work Smarter, Not Harder You can start by learning the ropes from other professionals. Practice what you see and read until you’re happy with the results. Then, refine and sustain your skills to remain current with the industry. Don’t rush yourself if you want to be successful. Instead, take your time to grow as a DJ. 2. Let Inspiration Guide You Every creative artist has a role model in the industry. There’s a reason for why you like styles you listen to the most. These should guide you to find your own personal style as a DJ. Don’t be afraid to try something new either. You may surprise yourself when you step out of your comfort zone. 3. Learn from Mistakes and Move Forward Too often, people give up because of doubt. Don’t let the mistakes you make drive you away from your goal. You can use these to refine and move forward. Mistakes are another tool you can use to grow. Finding a way to learn from them can help you reach your highest success. 4. Network to Learn How to Become a DJ When you’re trying to learn how to become a DJ, networking is crucial. You should reach out to local businesses, family and friends, co-workers, and social media to advertise yourself as a professional. You’d be surprised how many jobs you find from word of mouth. Another important networking choice is to meet others in the business and learn from them. You can find a DJ  with a click of a button. 5. Remain Professional Although your goal may be to liven up a party, you should still present yourself as an expert. Be reliable, accountable, and conduct your work as a business. Whether you’re networking or spinning at a club, remain professional. As a woman in a male-dominated industry, you’ll be faced with challenges that require a professional demeanor. Show the world who’s boss and act accordingly. Don’t Quit Your Daydream Now’s the time to turn your daydream into a real-life career move. You can achieve your goals with these expert tips for women on how to become a DJ. Whether you want it to be a side hustle or your career will depend on how bad you want it and how hard you’re willing to work for it. Are you ready to learn more tips for women that can change your life? If so, keep browsing our website today to remain current with trending topics, events, and more.

Via Syndication Cloud
Bianca Mari's insight:
This article is beneficial; Even though I am not pursuing the career of a DJ, is could be a beneficial tool in the producing world for both music theory and networking/building my brand. The article is short and to the point with positive insight.

This source did reference a reliable source where it was originally posted on 'WomenOnBusiness.com' however, it still seemed like this article was more based on personal opinion and advice on the author's experience rather than 'factual' data; Not to say this isn't true because a lot of this information could most definitely be used in more than just the DJ side of the industry to be honest. I would say out of all of the 'Evaluating Sources', this article would only have 'objectivity' as it informs the reader in a well thought out manner.

I don't consider this article to be a 'major' source for audio industry professionals. I think it is a great read in my opinion, but I wouldn't say that this would contribute too much to my success; maybe just a stepping stone in the right direction on organizing and positive affirmations to step out of my comfort zone and keep pushing forward especially coming from another female in the music industry.
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A Conversation With Zoe Keating: From Emily White's "How to Build a Sustainable Music Career and Collect All Revenue Streams"

A Conversation With Zoe Keating: From Emily White's "How to Build a Sustainable Music Career and Collect All Revenue Streams" | Women in The Music Industry | Scoop.it
Emily White has made a career out of helping independent creators as a manager, label owner and much more. She’s in the trenches with them every day. Fortunately, we are. Continue reading

Via midem
Bianca Mari's insight:
This article was VERY short, but I'm always looking for a great book to read to better my knowledge in this ever-changing industry. My dad always said, 'Obtaining it is the easy part, keeping it is the hard part.' There are many resources out there on how to start a music career but not too many that I know of to 'sustain' that said career.

The source is very reliable. You can get a great preview of the book on the link provided along with a detailed background on the author. The sight also provides a bunch of great sources. This source had the authority, objectivity, accuracy, and currency when using the 'Evaluating Sources' guide.

I haven't ready the book yet, but the article was very convincing. I would actually be interested in purchasing the book. I believe in my eyes that this has great potential to be a major resource for entry-level audio industry professionals.
Alanna Hayes's curator insight, May 25, 8:58 PM
Another article with Zoe Keating, but more so an interview to help build a sustainable career. A completely independent instrumental artist collecting her own revenue. This is important to all artists coming out into the world, so they can get bank and recognition for their talents too.
Dawn VanDam's curator insight, May 31, 11:11 AM

Emily White has made a career out of helping independent creators as a manager, label owner and much more. She’s in the trenches with them every day. Fortunately, we are. Continue reading

Jason Green's curator insight, July 26, 10:58 AM
Starting a career in the music industry can be very difficult to do , however having a game plan is the key. Knowing the business side is the most important part. This article does a good job of discussing having a manager, having a distribution plan and the importance of getting the business side of things squared aware first.  Many individuals just dive in to the music careers without taking time to focus on the business side and obligations and this can be a crucial mistake. 
Rescooped by Bianca Mari' from Royalty Increase
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Songwriters and artists call on US court to uphold Copyright Royalty Board’s streaming rate increase | Complete Music Update

Songwriters and artists call on US court to uphold Copyright Royalty Board’s streaming rate increase | Complete Music Update | Women in The Music Industry | Scoop.it
BUSINESS NEWS DIGITAL LABELS & PUBLISHERS LEGAL Songwriters and artists call on US court to uphold Copyright Royalty Board’s streaming rate increase By | Published on Wednesday 20 November 2019 Organisations representing songwriters and artists in the US have submitted an amicus brief to the DC Circuit Court Of Appeals urging them to uphold the most recent Copyright Royalty Board ruling on the compulsory licence covering mechanical rights Stateside. The rate increase for songwriters in that ruling, the organisations say, is not only “deserved” but also “critical” for many songwriters struggling to stay afloat in the streaming age. The compulsory licence means that a company exploiting the mechanical rights in any one song does not need specific permission from any songwriter or publisher that has a stake in that song. They just have to pay the rights owners royalties at a rate set by the CRB. Earlier this year, after a long review, the CRB confirmed it was increasing the rate to be paid by streaming services, so that – ultimately – those services would have to allocate 15.1% instead of 10.5% of their revenues to the song rights. This would bring the rate due under the US compulsory licence more or less in line with the rate music publishers have negotiated on the open market in countries where there is no compulsory licence to interfere in the deal making process. It’s also a total rate. A stream exploits both the performing and mechanical rights in a song, which are often licensed separately. Although the compulsory licence only covers mechanical rights, any monies paid for performing rights – usually via collecting societies like BMI and ASCAP – are basically deducted from the 15.1% figure. The increase was, unsurprisingly, welcomed by songwriters and publishers. But then most of the streaming firms, with the notable exception of Apple, announced that they were appealing the CRB ruling. Spotify has subsequently insisted that it doesn’t oppose the rate increase in principle, but has issues with some other technicalities in the revised compulsory licence. Songwriters and publishers, in the main, have not been impressed by such claims. Those unimpressed include the Songwriters Of North America organisation and the recently formed Music Artists Coalition. Arguing that songwriters are already unusually disadvantaged by the mere existence of the compulsory licence, they say that the rate rise on digital income is desperately needed by the songwriting community. And especially those songwriters who are not also artists, who cannot rely on other revenues like touring and merch. “For over a century, songwriters have been subject to a compulsory license, now embodied in section 115 of the Copyright Act, that determines the price to be paid for reproduction and distribution of the musical works they create”, the two groups say in their court submission. “There is no comparable example of a profession where the government sets the price for one’s labours”. It goes on: “After carefully weighing all of the evidence, the [judges that form the Copyright Royalty Board] determined that songwriters should be paid more, and increased the rate for interactive streaming under section 115. Songwriters deserved that raise. Indeed, for some, the added income will be a critical factor in their ability to continue in their careers as professional songwriters”. In an accompanying press statement SONA and MAC members expanded on why they felt the CRB rate rise was “critical” for allowing many songwriters to stay in business. Among them SONA board member Shelly Peiken, who said: “If I were trying to make it as a songwriter today dependent on digital royalties, I wouldn’t be able to sustain a livelihood the way I once did from the income of physical sales. Without sharing in master royalties, merchandising or touring revenue, most songwriters now have to consider holding down a second job. I sincerely hope the DC Circuit Court Of Appeals reaffirms the CRJs’ decision and takes the industry in the direction it desperately needs to go. Songwriters are counting on it”. READ MORE ABOUT: Copyright Royalty Board | Music Artists Coalition | Songwriters Of North America (SONA)

Via Fyf Scales
Bianca Mari's insight:
This article is very informative. I thought this would be a great addition to this 'scoop it' as it provides information that is pertinent to keep up to date with on streaming services, rates, and its changes.

The source provided was credible in all aspects (objectivity, accuracy, currency, and authority). It wasn't an 'exciting' read, but it was definitely credible. The source referenced Copyright Royalty Board, Music Artists Coalition, and Songwriters Of North America (SONA).

I would consider this to be a major informational resource for audio industry professionals.
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She demanded to be seen as a "woman" and she owned that - Interview with Women In Music

She demanded to be seen as a "woman" and she owned that - Interview with Women In Music | Women in The Music Industry | Scoop.it
Women In Music 's executives share their vision of the place and role of women in the music industry. Find out more in their interview.
Bianca Mari's insight:
In my opinion, the context of this article was not only inspiring, but when I was finished reading it I wanted to go through all of the links that were referenced to dig even deeper as this topic means a lot to me. Not many know the small percentage that makes up women audio engineers and/or producers so it was great to hear more on this coming to light and seeing the support that is offered.

As mentioned above, I actually did take the time to review all the links that were referenced within the article. All, including this one had enough credibility after checking the authority, objectivity, accuracy and currency using the Evaluating Sources Guide.

This source should definitely be provided to those women in the industry now. It's inspiring, of course, but it also show paths of those that are in the industry now, how they deal with things, and explaining their success. Overall, I'm glad I read this article and I took something and a few links for future tools out of it.
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Rescooped by Bianca Mari' from Scout Music Dot TV
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Music Licensing

Music Licensing | Women in The Music Industry | Scoop.it
If you love making music and want to start making money out of it, then we have some good news for you. There is an easy way on how you can make money with music licensing and being hired by one of the companies that are doing the licensing. But before you can get to know how to make money with music, you will need to know as much about this industry as possible. This is everything you will need to know about making money with your music through music licensing.

Via Scout Music
Bianca Mari's insight:
The article is very brief, however, it was straight to the point. The reason is caught my attention was the big lettering across the image that says 'music licensing'. The legal side of the music industry, especially as an independent artist, can be tricky so having new technology and tools readily available to help us through this process is a pro not a con!

The article is short but that doesn't discredit it's source. Scout Music is a well-known and credible music licensing service.

Since we are on the topic, it seemed only right that I post an article showing yet another great resource for others in the industry looking for distribution sources and assistance in licensing intellectual property. This would be a great resource for audio industry professionals.
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