Music and the Pandemic
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India's Independent Artists Thrive Outside Bollywood During COVID-19

India's Independent Artists Thrive Outside Bollywood During COVID-19 | Music and the Pandemic | Scoop.it
August is traditionally a vibrant period for India’s music industry, with myriad music festivals announced from October through February and tour dates booked for international artists — all …

Via Midem Team
Marshall Kipfs insight:
This article discusses how India is having a boom in the independent artist scene. Artists are releasing more and more music so they can be heard and discovered, and companies are opening up several record labels that will cater to these new independent artists. This is great news for the countries artists, and I hope that it continues to grow, in and out of India.

The article only has the name of a writer, does not have a sources cited portion, and is filled with other stories and ads. While some of this is understandable, this to me shows that this article is not somewhere I would go if I were an industry professional looking for current news. The other things on this page are far too distracting.
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Rescooped by Marshall Kipf from Audio and Music Industry COVID-19 Impact
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Musicians ask Spotify to triple payments to cover lost concert revenue | Music | The Guardian

Musicians ask Spotify to triple payments to cover lost concert revenue | Music | The Guardian | Music and the Pandemic | Scoop.it
Bandcamp has relaxed charges in light of Covid-19 but there is growing pressure on streaming services to compensate artists more fairly

Via Robert Redman
Marshall Kipfs insight:
This article shows that even in this trying time some companies are really willing to show their efforts to assist the artists, while other companies seem to be struggling with that same mentality. 

Now reliability of this article, there is not much information on the writer. The article does not have a list of sources. I would be hesitant to take this article as absolute truth. I also do not think that this article would be a major resource for people working in the industry.
Robert Redman's curator insight, March 20, 7:44 AM
Since concert venues are canceled or postponed, the artist is asking streaming companies to triple the payment cost to help the loss of their revenue.
Rescooped by Marshall Kipf from Audio and Music Industry COVID-19 Impact
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Coronavirus Should Be a Turning Point for the Music Industry

Coronavirus Should Be a Turning Point for the Music Industry | Music and the Pandemic | Scoop.it
The impending live music freezeout drives home the extent to which the current music industry model is, itself, a kind of disaster relief strategy built to counteract a precipitous drop in the public concept of how much a song or album is worth.

Via Robert Redman
Marshall Kipfs insight:
This article discusses some chilling information. From record stores having to struggle longer into the year without the "superfans" and artists and touring individuals having no income due to the pandemic canceling tours and festivals. This shows that the industry was not ready for something like this to happen, and some artists have increased how much their albums sell for, which better represents how much it actually costs to make the music we all love.

The writer has no information on his background in the field, no short summary of who they are, just a name with links to their information elsewhere. There is also no sources cited section in the article, just imbedded sources in the article itself. I would not consider this as a good place for a professional to obtain information regarding recent news. 
Robert Redman's curator insight, March 20, 7:56 AM
The article talks about how streaming might take over during this nightmare of the coronavirus. It will be the norm for people to be in a closed shelter listening to music and not support the artist that they love in a live concert. 
Rescooped by Marshall Kipf from New Music Industry
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India's Independent Artists Thrive Outside Bollywood During COVID-19

India's Independent Artists Thrive Outside Bollywood During COVID-19 | Music and the Pandemic | Scoop.it
August is traditionally a vibrant period for India’s music industry, with myriad music festivals announced from October through February and tour dates booked for international artists — all …

Via Midem Team
Marshall Kipfs insight:
This article discusses how India is having a boom in the independent artist scene. Artists are releasing more and more music so they can be heard and discovered, and companies are opening up several record labels that will cater to these new independent artists. This is great news for the countries artists, and I hope that it continues to grow, in and out of India.

The article only has the name of a writer, does not have a sources cited portion, and is filled with other stories and ads. While some of this is understandable, this to me shows that this article is not somewhere I would go if I were an industry professional looking for current news. The other things on this page are far too distracting.
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marshall Kipf from Audio and Music Industry COVID-19 Impact
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How Coronavirus Is Impacting The Music Community | Advocacy

How Coronavirus Is Impacting The Music Community | Advocacy | Music and the Pandemic | Scoop.it
With the global concert industry now in flux, the coronavirus disruption has created a volatile environment for artists, musicians, songwriters and producers on every level.

Via Robert Redman
Marshall Kipfs insight:
This article talks a lot on how the live music industry was affected after the pandemic caused a wave of canceled tours and festivals. Hopefully as time moves forward the artists and crews relying on touring as a way to make money will be able to get back on the road.

For the reliability of the article, there are a lot of sources cited in the article itself, but it does not have a sources sited portion showing a list of where they got the information. The writer has only a name on the article, no information on the credentials of the writer. This is another article that I would have a hard time seeing the professionals in this industry using for their news.
Robert Redman's curator insight, March 20, 7:35 AM
This article talks about how the Audio and Music industry will struggle economically, especially musician who lives off live concerts and gigs are not able to get a paycheck.
quinessakidd@gmail.com's curator insight, June 19, 11:13 AM
It’s hard when you’re use to making more than enough money to support you and your family financially and then boom...you’re hit with hardship, I sure there are some of us who can relate to this.
Alex DelPrete's curator insight, July 25, 9:44 AM
I heard about this before, I just didn't know how bad it is.

Grammy Grammy Grammy. The parasite of the music industry in my opinion. The source is a little shifty.
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‘An effective vaccine will be the ultimate solution, but until that is realized, the Chinese music business has quickly found ways to innovate.’

‘An effective vaccine will be the ultimate solution, but until that is realized, the Chinese music business has quickly found ways to innovate.’ | Music and the Pandemic | Scoop.it
Modern Sky’s Dave Pichilingi on what coming out of COVID-19 lockdown has looked like for the music industry in China…

Via Midem Team
Marshall Kipfs insight:
This article was an interesting read. Modern Sky and other companies in China have found a way to still let the artists make some money during the pandemic. A festival called "Strawberry Nebula" is allowing artists to perform without going on tour, and also allowing fans to interact with the artists. It will be interesting to see if other countries follow this platform in the future.

The article was written without the name of the writer, but seems to have been written in conjunction of an interview with Dave Pichilingi. There are no sources cited on the article, and while this article does hold some interesting information, and looks rather professional, I would still be hesitant to say that professionals in the industry would use this website to obtain relevant news.
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