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How to Become and Remain a Transformational Teacher

How to Become and Remain a Transformational Teacher | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it

However talented, no one is a natural-born teacher. Honing the craft takes significant care and effort, not just by the individual, but also by the school at large. Though experience does matter, it matters only to the extent that a teacher -- regardless of how long he or she has been in the classroom -- commits to continued professional development to refresh his or her status as a transformational teacher. Along those lines, even after a decade in the classroom, I don't claim to be beyond criticism -- not in the least. Still, I wish to offer some advice on constantly striving toward perfection, however elusive that goal will always remain.


Transformational teachers share best practices, build mentoring relationships, observe their peers, keep things fresh, model their subject's usefulness, and demonstrate caring beyond what they teach.

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Skype Meetings - free online meetings with screen sharing and collaboration for up to 10 people

Skype Meetings - free online meetings with screen sharing and collaboration for up to 10 people | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it

Check out the new free Skype Meetings! PowerPoint collaboration and screen sharing. Personalized URL to join from any device. Video calls with up to 10 people for free.

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The Edward J. Stemmler Medical Education Research Fund provides up to $150,000 of support - Letter of Intent Deadline July 1st

The Edward J. Stemmler Medical Education Research Fund provides up to $150,000 of support - Letter of Intent Deadline July 1st | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it

This is a reminder that the Edward J. Stemmler, MD Medical Education Research Fund 2016-2017 Letter of Intent deadline is July 1, 2016. In the 2016-2017 funding cycle, applicants may request up to $150,000 of NBME funding support for a project period of up to two years.


Applicants may go to http://www.nbme.org/research/CFLOI.html for more detailed information. There is a direct link to the online Stemmler Fund online system where applicants may create a brief profile, store their application, and have the ability to track their progress throughout the process of the cycle.


The purpose of the Stemmler Fund is to provide support for research and development in innovative evaluation methodologies or techniques, with the potential to advance assessment in medical education or practice. Expected outcomes include advances in the theory, knowledge, or practice of assessment at any point along the continuum of medical education, from undergraduate and graduate education and training through practice. Both pilots and more com-prehensive projects are of interest. Collaborative investigations within or among institutions are eligible and encouraged, particularly as they strengthen the likelihood of the project's contribution and success.


Eligible applicants for Stemmler Fund grant awards are medical schools accredited by the LCME or the AOA. The number of Letters of Intent submitted by any eligible school is not limited.


Questions can be directed to: Stemmlerfund@nbme.org 215-590-9657

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iDisorder and Education

iDisorder and Education | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it

The concept iDisorder was coined by Dr. Larry Rosen (who wrote a book about it), and it is defined as “changes to your brain´s ability to process information and your ability to relate to the world due to your daily use of media and technology resulting in signs and symptoms of psychological disorders – such as stress, sleeplessness, and a compulsive need to check in with all of your technology.”


iDisorder and Education - It’s an interesting concept when you consider it in the context of education. Outside of education many of us are glued to our devices, continually checking and refreshing our email and frequently visited websites. Within the realm of education, students are doing this too, and it’s causing an increased expectations (on the instructor) to be constantly available.


Whenever I work with faculty members on crafting their course outlines or syllabus, I always emphasize the importance of setting expectations; not just for assignments or graded components, but for their availability. When will you be available in office? What will your email turnaround time be? When will you return feedback on assignments? Without defining these expectations, faculty members are setting themselves up for failure in terms of how students perceive their availability. In a society where ‘on demand’ is a popular service offering, students have been trained to believe that you, as an instructor, will also be on demand.

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Free Orthopedic Teaching Resources from Feinberg School of Medicine: Northwestern University

Free Orthopedic Teaching Resources from Feinberg School of Medicine: Northwestern University | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it

This space is a case-based study guide designed toward understanding the Emergency Medicine diagnostic and management principles of key orthopedic injuries and lesions seen in the Emergency Department. Learning materials include cases and instructional videos.

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How do you make a young doctor really understand what it's like being 74? Virtual reality.

How do you make a young doctor really understand what it's like being 74? Virtual reality. | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it
This extraordinary virtual reality project could teach young medical students to empathize with older patients.
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Educating medical students in the era of ubiquitous information

Educating medical students in the era of ubiquitous information | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it

Charles P. Friedman, Katherine M. Donaldson & Anna V. Vantsevich (2016). Educating medical students in the era of ubiquitous information. Medical Teacher: Vol. 38, No. 5, pp. 504-509. doi: 10.3109/0142159X.2016.1150990


Health care around the world is going digital. This inexorable trend will result in: (1) routine documentation of care in digital form and emerging national infrastructures for sharing data that allow progress toward a learning health system; and (2) a biomedical “knowledge cloud” that is fully integrated into practice environments and accessible to both providers and consumers of healthcare. Concurrently, medical students will be complete digital natives who have literally grown up with the Internet and will enter practice early in the next decade when the projected changes in practice approach maturity. This essay describes three competencies linked to this evolving information environment—(1) knowing what you do and don’t know, (2) ability to ask a good question, and (3) skills in evaluating and weighing evidence—and suggests educational approaches to promote student mastery of each competency. Shifting medical education to address these competencies will call into question many current methods but may be essential to fully prepare trainees for optimal practice in the future.

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USC Keck School of Medicine INNOVATIONS IN MEDICAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE 2017 • February 24-25, 2017 • Los Angeles, CA

USC Keck School of Medicine INNOVATIONS IN MEDICAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE 2017 • February 24-25, 2017 • Los Angeles, CA | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it
INNOVATIONS IN MEDICAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE 2017 Friday-Saturday, February 24-25, 2017 • Los Angeles, CA

 225 West Valley Boulevard, San Gabriel, California, 91776, USA
 TEL: 1-626-270-2700 FAX: 1-626-270-2777

Sponsored by the Department of Medical Education and the Office of Continuing Medical Education Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California

The Department of Medical Education at the University of Southern California presents our 14th annual Innovations in Medical Education (IME) Conference on Friday and Saturday, February 24 and 25, 2017. The IME conference joins together a community of educators interested in promoting change through innovation in health professions education. We have prepared an exciting and stimulating program with an outstanding plenary speaker, conference workshops, research papers, and cool ideas seeking collaborators. We invite you to participate by presenting your innovative work in health professions education.
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Gamification Taxonomy

Gamification Taxonomy | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it

We have conducted extensive empirical research over the last 4 years as part of a university PhD program to develop the world's first comprehensive enterprise gamification taxonomy. Our taxonomy has been peer reviewed and is built on our database of over 300 enterprise gamification projects.

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Edgar Schein: "Humble Leadership" | Talks at Google

Author and organizational culture expert Ed Schein joined Google VP of People Development Karen May in a fireside chat at Google's Mountain View office
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Edorble – A free 3D Virtual Classroom

Edorble – A free 3D Virtual Classroom | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it

I was delighted when I first saw Edorble because I felt it offered the opportunity for any teacher to set up their own 3D virtual classroom and start teaching online for free.


How do you create a 3D virtual classroom? The process of claiming your Edorble Online classroom is quite simple. Edorble-claimGo to: http://edorble.com/ and click on Claim World. This will take you to a sign up page. There you can register with your email address or one of your social media accounts. You will then need to download the Edorble application. Also make a note of your code. This is the unique number that helps you and your students to enter your room.

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New Faculty Orientation Features Advice from Students

New Faculty Orientation Features Advice from Students | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it

Advice from students when asked: What advice do you have for faculty on how to become like your best professors?


• Use real-world examples in the classroom and clinic.

• Show students that you value them as people…use names & show respect.

• Recognize and accommodate different learning styles.

• Be personal—share your story with students.

• Get feedback from students. Feedback is the gift that keeps on giving!

• Be available.

• Help struggling students.

• Be relatable—students want to connect with professors/clinicians on some level.

• Keep communication open.

• Offer live and virtual office hours.


Grade yourself on these attributes and make a plan to work toward mastery of one or more. Review your syllabi, lesson plans, office or student rotation instructions and see if there’s a way to 1.) fight for feedback; 2.) obey one of the principles above; 3.) have a good colleague discussion using this list.

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10 Tools for More Interactive Videos -- Campus Technology

10 Tools for More Interactive Videos -- Campus Technology | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it
Forget about PowerPoints with voice-over — that's old school. These "new school" apps can help you engage your students while they're learning from your lectures.
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Podcasts: Accessing, Choosing, Creating, and Disseminating Content

Podcasts: Accessing, Choosing, Creating, and Disseminating Content | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it

James Ahn, P. Charles Inboriboon, and Michael C. Bond (2016) Podcasts: Accessing, Choosing, Creating, and Disseminating Content. Journal of Graduate Medical Education: July 2016, Vol. 8, No. 3, pp. 435-436. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4300/JGME-D-16-00205.1

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Medical Education Online (MEO) is recruiting reviewers

Medical Education Online (MEO) is recruiting reviewers | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it


Medical Education Online (MEO) is a peer-reviewed international Open Access journal for disseminating information on the education and training of physicians and other health care professionals.


Submissions to Medical Education Online (MEO) are rapidly growing and they are recruiting reviewers to add to the peer review database. If you are interested in joining the reviewer pool, please register using this link.

http://med-ed-online.net/index.php/meo/user/register


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How Doctors Die Differently - Forbes

How Doctors Die Differently - Forbes | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it

As a trauma surgeon, she has seen death up close. She knows what ribs cracking from chest compression sounds like and feels like. She knows what it sounds like for a patient who’s having a hard time breathing. She has seen death. She has heard it. And she has “literally felt it.” In speaking with her, I can’t help but notice her very pragmatic approach to death. There’s no denying the truism in her statement, “ The bottom line is is that if you are living, you are dying. Some people just die faster than others.” When I asked her how doctors choose to die differently, she explained it in this way:


"We want less intervention. There’s a greater understanding of what death looks like. That’s the very unfortunate home field advantage—I know what death looks like. In general, we tend to involve hospice early. We tend to choose fewer interventions. We draw the line. We know where to draw the line. We know how this story is going to end. The ending is going to be the same but there are two different paths. Doctors choose the path less traveled when it comes to death."

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Mobile technologies in medical education

Mobile technologies in medical education | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it


Ken Masters , Rachel H. Ellaway , David Topps , Douglas Archibald , Rebecca J. Hogue (2016). Mobile technologies in medical education: AMEE Guide No. 105. Medical Teacher: Vol. 38, No. 6, pp. 537-549. doi: 10.3109/0142159X.2016.1141190



Mobile technology has developed rapidly, and there is every reason to expect that it will continue to do so. For instance, Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android currently dominate the mobile device environment. Although educators wish to concentrate on education, they will need to keep an eye on other operating systems and technological developments, as sudden changes may cause a shift in their learners’ preferences. While these advances do not supply panaceas, they do afford many possibilities to both medical learners and their teachers. If educators wish to remain in safe zones, hoping to merely use mobile technologies to do what they have always done, then these possibilities will be wasted and may even prove harmful. To properly utilise mobile technologies, medical educators need to grasp the underlying principles governing their social and pedagogical uses, and then to create an environment in which these technologies can be effectively utilised. In so doing, medical educators can better utilise the advantages of using mobile technologies and they can better prepare their learners for practice in a world in which mobile technology use is pervasive and transformative.

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OnPar - A free  clinical reasoning game for healthcare professionals produced by Mayo Clinic

OnPar - A free  clinical reasoning game for healthcare professionals produced by Mayo Clinic | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it
Diagnose real-life cases documented by experts at the Mayo Clinic. Test your clinical reasoning skills throughout the day with 5 to 10 minute cases. Learn how each case was diagnosed by reading the expert's clinical assessment.
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Improving patient care by bridging the divide between doctors and data scientists

Improving patient care by bridging the divide between doctors and data scientists | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it
Analyzing electronic data from many doctors' experiences with many patients, we can move ever closer to answering the age-old question: what is truly best for each patient?
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$1,300 to take one test? Med students are fed up.

$1,300 to take one test? Med students are fed up. | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it
Harvard students are leading a campaign to eliminate one of three mandatory exams, and they are gaining the support of state medical associations.
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Free How To Guides for the Busy Clinician

Free How To Guides for the Busy Clinician | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it
Produced by the Academic Section of Medical Education within the Deanery, the series provides a comprehensive overview of a range of educational topics in a readily accessible format. Our 'Deanery update' issues detail the various central support facilities available within the Deanery.
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Mindfulness for Educators - Graduate School of Education

Mindfulness for Educators - Graduate School of Education | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it

11/2/16 to 11/4/16

Tuition: $1,650 per person

•Understand mindfulness as an evidence-based practice designed to foster qualities of mind that are central to both personal growth and professional effectiveness

•Identify common patterns of overreaction and sample practices to respond to difficulties with awareness, poise, and wisdom

•Reconnect with core personal values and develop strategies to avoid being derailed by stress and discomfort

•Recognize and work skillfully with in-the-moment challenges, rather than ignoring them, pushing them aside, or obsessing over them

•Identify opportunities and obstacles to adopting mindfulness practices within your professional setting

•Renew yourself and your capacity for fun, joy, and resilience

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LibreOffice - Free alternative to Microsoft Office

LibreOffice - Free alternative to Microsoft Office | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it

LibreOffice is a powerful office suite – its clean interface and feature-rich tools help you unleash your creativity and enhance your productivity. LibreOffice includes several applications that make it the most powerful Free and Open Source office suite on the market: Writer (word processing), Calc (spreadsheets), Impress (presentations), Draw (vector graphics and flowcharts), Base (databases), and Math (formula editing).

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Edtech and Elearning 2016: Top 200 Influencers and Brands

Edtech and Elearning 2016: Top 200 Influencers and Brands | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it
An exhaustive list of the top 200 edtech and elearning influencers and brands driving the most engagement in 2016, including quotes from the experts.
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‘Speed advising’ for medical students applying to residency programs: an efficient supplement to traditional advising  | Medical Education Online

‘Speed advising’ for medical students applying to residency programs: an efficient supplement to traditional advising  | Medical Education Online | Medical Faculty Development | Scoop.it

‘Speed advising’ for medical students applying to residency programs: an efficient supplement to traditional advising

Jillian L. McGrath*, Jason J. Bischof, Sarah Greenberger, Daniel J. Bachmann, David P. Way, Diane L. Gorgas and Nicholas E. Kman Department of Emergency Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA


Background: Over time, Residency Match dynamics fluctuate with some specialties experiencing increases in medical student popularity. Academic departments with limited resources must devise methods for coping with increased demand for their specialty. Students perceive traditional programs on Match mechanics as inadequate. Subsequently, faculty are confronted with demands for more personal attention from more students.


Objectives: We developed a strategy for providing specialty-specific residency match advising to large numbers of students.


Methods: The ‘speed-advising’ session (SAS) was developed to address the common questions and concerns that medical students pose during the Match process and to provide advisees with a breadth of faculty perspectives. Two SASs were offered over a 2-week period. After the sessions, students and faculty were surveyed regarding their experience. Results: Twenty-six students pursued our specialty in the 2015 Match (26 of 234, 11.1%). Twenty-three (89%) participated in the SAS. Seventy-four percent of students (17 of 23) and all faculty completed the post-session survey. Students found the SAS to be informative, helpful and an efficient use of time. Common discussion topics included: career goals, to which programs and how many to apply, and how academic record impacts their likelihood of matching in our specialty. Students would have preferred more time with each faculty; however, most (77%) conceded that their questions were adequately answered. Faculty-favored speed advising over traditional advising (86%), primarily due to estimated time savings of 7.3 h per faculty member.


Conclusions: In preparing students for the Match, specialty-specific speed advising offers an efficient supplement to traditional advising.

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