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MED-Amin network
(Mediterranean Agricultural Information Network) Fostering cooperation and experience sharing among the national information systems on agricultural (cereals) markets in the Mediterranean. The network of 13 countries is coordinated by CIHEAM, and more specifically by its Mediterranean Agronomic Institute (MAI) of Montpellier.
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On farm analysis of the effect of the preceding crop on N uptake and grain yield of durum wheat in Mediterranean conditions

Published online on 5 September 2018.

One of the challenges of eco-efficient agriculture is the development of operational farming practices to increase the level of agricultural production, maximize the efficiency of resource use and reduce environmental impacts. Based on the efficiency frontier concept and the decomposition of resource use efficiency, we used a three-quadrant framework allowing to carry a functional analysis of the cropping system. Using a data envelope approach, we established boundary curves which represent the maximum achievable performances (yield, N uptake) when N is the only limiting factor. This framework has been first implemented and tested using published data from 112 agronomic situations of rainfed durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) in experimental fields in northern Syria and then further applied on a data set of 245 agronomic situations of durum wheat in farmers’ fields in two grain-producing regions of Tunisia. The results demonstrated the impact of preceding crops: durum wheat following legumes or vegetable showed a higher potential for N uptake but with only a minor effect on its conversion into grains. This positive effect of diversified rotation on potential N uptake by durum wheat is partly of-set by increased N uptake gaps in farmer’s fields indicating a higher effect of other limiting factors.

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To download the publication, click here https://doi.org/10.1080/03650340.2018.1514111

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Intensification durable de l'agriculture par les associations de cultures : vers une nouvelle « révolution verte » ?

Intensification durable de l'agriculture par les associations de cultures : vers une nouvelle « révolution verte » ? | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

Dans un article paru en février dans Science of the Total Environment, des chercheurs du Québec ont réalisé une méta-analyse des bénéfices des associations de cultures (introduction de cultures intercalaires dans les rotations), en termes de potentiels énergétique (calories), économique et d'économie d'espace. De belles perspectives pour repousser les plafonds de rendement futurs et aider ainsi à résoudre les crises de sécurité alimentaire.

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Faced With Drought, the Pharaohs Tried (and Failed) to Adapt

Faced With Drought, the Pharaohs Tried (and Failed) to Adapt | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

By Livia Albeck-Ripka (The New York Times), March 30, 2018

Ancient Egyptian leaders increased their empire’s grain production and crossbred cattle for resilience in an early effort to ward off climate disaster, a study shows.

In a study published in this year’s edition of the journal Egypt and the Levant, the researchers pieced together ancient evidence — including flint and bone records from the fallen city of Megiddo, fossilized pollen data from the Sea of Galilee and ancient cattle DNA — to shed light on how Bronze Age Egyptians used careful planning and policies to adapt to a drought that lasted from around 1250 B.C. to 1100 B.C., while their ancient counterparts appeared to be less well prepared.

In anticipation of a crisis in their empire’s southeastern arid zones, ancient leaders ordered increased grain production in its greener parts, and crossbred local cattle with zebu, or humped cattle, to create a more heat-resistant plow animal, the researchers found.

Even with preparation, however, the Egyptian empire ultimately collapsed. But the study shows how recognizing and preparing for climate disaster can make societies more resilient.

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To download the scientific publication, click on this link

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