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MED-Amin network
(Mediterranean Agricultural Information Network) Fostering cooperation and experience sharing among the national information systems on agricultural (cereals) markets in the Mediterranean. The network of 13 countries is coordinated by CIHEAM, and more specifically by its Mediterranean Agronomic Institute (MAI) of Montpellier.
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THE STATE OF FOOD SECURITY AND NUTRITION IN THE WORLD 2020

This year, the report includes a special focus on transforming food systems for affordable healthy diets. It analyses the cost and affordability of healthy diets around the world, by region and in different development contexts. New analysis is presented on the “hidden” health and climate-change costs associated with our current food consumption patterns, as well as the cost savings if we shift towards healthy diets that include sustainability considerations. The report also offers policy recommendations to transform current food systems and make them able to deliver affordable healthy diets for all – crucial to all efforts to achieve Zero Hunger – SDG2.

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FAO - News Article: Healthy soils are essential to achieve Zero Hunger, peace and prosperity

FAO - News Article: Healthy soils are essential to achieve Zero Hunger, peace and prosperity | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

by FAO, 13/08/2018

Improving the health of the world's soils is essential to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, including Zero Hunger and combating climate change and its impacts, FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva, today told participants of the World Congress of Soil Science.

In a video message to the event, which is being attended by more than 2,000 scientists from around the world, Graziano da Silva noted that approximately one third of the Earth's soil is degraded.

"Soil degradation affects food production, causing hunger and malnutrition, amplifying food-price volatility, forcing land abandonment and involuntary migration-leading millions into poverty," he said.

The FAO The Status of the World's Soil Resources report has identified 10 major threats to soil functions including soil erosion, soil nutrient imbalance, soil carbon and biodiversity losses, soil acidification, contamination, soil salinization, and soil compaction.

Graziano da Silva stressed the importance of sustainable soil management as an "essential part of the Zero Hunger equation" in a world where more than 815 million people are suffering from hunger and malnutrition.

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