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MED-Amin network
(Mediterranean Agricultural Information Network) Fostering cooperation and experience sharing among the national information systems on agricultural (cereals) markets in the Mediterranean. The network of 13 countries is coordinated by CIHEAM, and more specifically by its Mediterranean Agronomic Institute (MAI) of Montpellier.
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More floods and water scarcity ahead, but there is still time to mitigate their severity

More floods and water scarcity ahead, but there is still time to mitigate their severity | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

EU releases, 11/12/2018 - Flooding and water scarcity in Europe will increase in the coming decades, but to a much lesser extent if the objectives of the Paris Agreement on climate change are met.

A new JRC study looks at the impact of the changing climate, land use and water usage on Europe's water resources.

"We used a water resources model to estimate the impact of the changing climate under two 30-year scenarios. In one scenario, the targets of the Paris Agreement to keep global temperature rise below 2˚C are met. In the other, global temperatures increase by more than 2˚C. We modelled the consequences on Europe's water resources under these two scenarios", said JRC researcher Ad De Roo.

Researchers concluded that while the impacts would be substantially less severe if the Paris Agreement targets were met, flooding and summer water scarcity are projected to increase under both scenarios.

"To minimise future consequences, it is essential that the targets of the Paris Agreement are met sooner rather than later, and it is even better if we manage to stay well below those targets. We also believe that mitigation alone is not enough but that adaptation strategies such as water saving and efficiency measures will also be needed to cope with the future climate change impacts", Ad De Roo said.

CIHEAM Newss insight:

https://ec.europa.eu/clima/news/europe-ready-climate-impacts-commission-evaluates-its-strategy_en

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JRC to continue key role in maximising research and innovation impact

JRC to continue key role in maximising research and innovation impact | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

from European Commission, 7th of June 2018.

The European Commission today proposes 'Horizon Europe', an ambitious €100 billion research and innovation programme for the next long-term EU budget running from 2021-2027.

The proposal is launched as the JRC releases its Annual Report for 2017, looking back on the activities and accomplishments of the JRC during its 60th year of existence.

Horizon Europe funding will ensure the JRC continues its role as the European Commission’s science and knowledge service, carrying out research and providing independent scientific advice to EU and national policymakers.

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MARS bulletin of North African countries for 2017-2018 campaign (last release)

MARS bulletin of North African countries for 2017-2018 campaign (last release) | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

27/07/2018 - MARS bulletins - crop monitoring in Europe - The European Commission's science and knowledge service

The second (and the last) bulletin of North African countries for 2017-2018 campaign has just been released by the JRC.

CIHEAM Newss insight:

To download the whole bulletin, please click here

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An evaluation framework to build a cost-efficient crop monitoring system: from the European crop monitoring system case

An evaluation framework to build a cost-efficient crop monitoring system: from the European crop monitoring system case | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

This paper presents an evaluation framework followed to identify cost-efficient alternatives to extend the MARS Crop Yield Forecasting System (MCYFS), run by the European Commission Joint Research Centre since 1992, to other main producing areas of the world: Eastern European Neighbourhood, Asia, Australia, South America and North America. These new systems would follow the principles and components of the MCYFS Europe: a meteorological data infrastructure, a remote sensing data infrastructure, a crop modelling platform, statistical tools, a team of analysts and a crop area estimation component. The framework designed evaluates the performance of the possible MCYFS-like system realizations against six defined objectives and their costs. Possible monitoring systems are based on a combination of different technical solutions for each of the MCYFS components, and are evaluated through an automatic algorithm that calculates the expected system performance –relying on a priori expert judgement–, the costs, and possible risks to construct some technical solutions, to finally identify the cost-efficient ones. A baseline system, achieving the minimum required performance, was identified as the most efficient starting point for the MCYFS extension in all the geographical areas. Such system would be built upon: (i) near real-time reanalysis meteorological products; (ii) remote sensing data from low-resolution (~1 km) platforms with a long-term product archive; (iii) crop models based on crop-specific model calibration from experimental data published in scientific literature; (iv) statistical methods based on trend and regression analysis applied to national level; (v) a team of analysts with specific technical profiles (on meteorology, remote sensing, and agronomy); and (vi) digital classification of very high resolution imagery supported by non-expensive ground surveys for area estimation. In countries where accessibility to local data and resources is high the baseline system can be upgraded enhancing some of the components: sub-national statistical analysis with additional statistical methods like multiple regression or scenario analysis; recruitment of experts on local agricultural conditions in the team of analysts; local calibration of crop models with experimental data; and exploiting high and low resolution biophysical products from remote sensing for crop monitoring.