MED-Amin network
9.5K views | +0 today
Follow
MED-Amin network
(Mediterranean Agricultural Information Network) Fostering cooperation and experience sharing among the national information systems on agricultural (cereals) markets in the Mediterranean. The network of 13 countries is coordinated by CIHEAM, and more specifically by its Mediterranean Agronomic Institute (MAI) of Montpellier.
Curated by CIHEAM News
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by CIHEAM News from CIHEAM Press Review
Scoop.it!

A Lebanese farmer’s tale: Amid coronavirus, struggles to import supplies, prices rise

A Lebanese farmer’s tale: Amid coronavirus, struggles to import supplies, prices rise | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

The Lebanese agriculture and food production industry has come under multiple threats, and the coronavirus-spurred economic contraction has exacerbated the hit already laid upon the sector by the ongoing currency crisis. Experts warn that compounding issues in the country could lead to production decreases and further price increases in the coming months.
Food prices in the country are already on the rise as inflation has begun to soar and the local currency has lost half its value against the dollar.

No comment yet.
Scooped by CIHEAM News
Scoop.it!

World Food Week 15-19 October

World Food Week 15-19 October | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

FAO Media Advisory

This year's World Food Week starting on 15 October takes place in a global context where conflict, climate extremes and an increase in obesity are reversing progress made in the fight against hunger and malnutrition.  A series of events including World Food Day on 16 October will explore the actions needed to put achieving Zero Hunger back on track.

No comment yet.
Scooped by CIHEAM News
Scoop.it!

Conflicts and weather patterns strain food security in Africa (FAO)

Conflicts and weather patterns strain food security in Africa (FAO) | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

High levels of food insecurity persist in the world, due largely to conflicts and to adverse climatic shocks that are taking a toll, particularly in East African and Near East countries, where large numbers of people continue to be in need of humanitarian assistance, a new FAO report notes. Some 37 countries are in need of external assistance for food, unchanged from three months ago, according to the Crop Prospects and Food Situation report issued today. Civil war and insecurity are direct reasons for high hunger rates in 16 of those countries, ranging from Burundi to Yemen. Conflict is displacing millions of people, hampering agricultural activities and, in many cases, also driving basic food prices up sharply, the report notes. Inflation in the Democratic Republic of Congo more than doubled in 2017 to a 42 percent annual rate. Violence has disrupted traditional trade routes around the Sahel, driving up prices, while food shortages are reported around southern and eastern Libya. Meanwhile, inadequate and erratic rainfall poses a growing threat to food security in Southern Africa as well as in Eastern Africa, where many rural households have suffered from four consecutive drought-affected agricultural seasons.

CIHEAM Newss insight:

Download from the FAO Newsroom

No comment yet.
Rescooped by CIHEAM News from CIHEAM Press Review
Scoop.it!

In Lebanon, a Pandemic of Hunger

In Lebanon, a Pandemic of Hunger | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

The New York Times, 06/05 — Anger over a failing economy and unaffordable food has pushed protesters into the streets despite the coronavirus.

Two weeks ago, it seemed every conversation in Lebanon was about keeping safe from the virus. The bustling streets of Beirut were quiet; everyone wore masks and gloves and glared at anyone who coughed in public. The smell of hand sanitizers filled elevators.

No comment yet.
Scooped by CIHEAM News
Scoop.it!

FAO - News Article: Healthy soils are essential to achieve Zero Hunger, peace and prosperity

FAO - News Article: Healthy soils are essential to achieve Zero Hunger, peace and prosperity | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

by FAO, 13/08/2018

Improving the health of the world's soils is essential to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, including Zero Hunger and combating climate change and its impacts, FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva, today told participants of the World Congress of Soil Science.

In a video message to the event, which is being attended by more than 2,000 scientists from around the world, Graziano da Silva noted that approximately one third of the Earth's soil is degraded.

"Soil degradation affects food production, causing hunger and malnutrition, amplifying food-price volatility, forcing land abandonment and involuntary migration-leading millions into poverty," he said.

The FAO The Status of the World's Soil Resources report has identified 10 major threats to soil functions including soil erosion, soil nutrient imbalance, soil carbon and biodiversity losses, soil acidification, contamination, soil salinization, and soil compaction.

Graziano da Silva stressed the importance of sustainable soil management as an "essential part of the Zero Hunger equation" in a world where more than 815 million people are suffering from hunger and malnutrition.

No comment yet.