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MED-Amin network
(Mediterranean Agricultural Information Network) Fostering cooperation and experience sharing among the national information systems on agricultural (cereals) markets in the Mediterranean. The network of 13 countries is coordinated by CIHEAM, and more specifically by its Mediterranean Agronomic Institute (MAI) of Montpellier.
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L’OMC publie le rapport du Groupe spécial concernant les subventions agricoles chinoises

L’OMC publie le rapport du Groupe spécial concernant les subventions agricoles chinoises | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it
Le 28 février, l’OMC a distribué le rapport du Groupe spécial chargé d’examiner l’affaire introduite par les États-Unis “Chine — Soutien interne aux producteurs agricoles” (DS511).
CIHEAM Newss insight:

Pour télécharger le document https://www.wto.org/french/tratop_f/dispu_f/511r_conc_f.pdf

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Les stocks mondiaux de maïs doublent après recensement agricole en Chine

Les stocks mondiaux de maïs doublent après recensement agricole en Chine | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

Par AFP, 09/11/2018

Le ministère américain de l'Agriculture (USDA) a révisé jeudi ses prévisions mondiales de production de céréales et d'oléagineux à la lumière d'une mise à jour des données sur l'agriculture chinoise qui double les stocks de maïs.

Le bureau chinois des statistiques « s'est rendu compte qu'il manquait 7 millions d'hectares de maïs chaque année, ce qui représente 50 millions de tonnes de maïs en plus sur les 5 dernières années ». Du coup « cela a fait remonter les stocks de report en Chine de 150 millions de tonnes, ce qui est énorme car ça fait doubler les stocks mondiaux », à 307,5 millions de tonnes, explique Alexandre Boy, analyste en chef au cabinet Agritel à l'AFP. « Mais les Chinois n'exportent pas de maïs, donc cela n'aura aucun impact sur le marché mondial », ajoute Alexandre Boy. La prévision de production mondiale de maïs est aussi revue à la hausse, à 1,1 milliard de tonnes.

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China cuts 2019 minimum purchase price for wheat for second year

China cuts 2019 minimum purchase price for wheat for second year | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

By Hellenic Shipping News Worldwide, 20/11/2018

China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) said it had set the minimum purchasing price for wheat in 2019 at 112 yuan ($16.14) per 50 kg, or 2,240 yuan a tonne.

The price is down from this year’s 2,300 yuan per tonne and the second year in a row that the government has reduced its price support for wheat growers.

Beijing made the price adjustment to help whittle down the nation’s huge grain stocks, and to push farmers to grow more high quality crops, the NDRC, the country’s state economic planner, said in a separate statement published on its website on Friday.

China started adjusting its minimum purchase prices scheme for its grains in 2015, part of the nation’s overhaul of its vast agriculture sector.

Under the reform, Chinese farmers have grown more high-quality wheat and rice, according to the statement.

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U.S.–China Trade Dispute and Potential Impacts on Agriculture

U.S.–China Trade Dispute and Potential Impacts on Agriculture | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

by Mary A. Marchant and H. Holly Wang (Choices magazine), 2nd quarter of 2018.

The United States and China, the world’s largest economic powers, have dueled in an escalating trade dispute since January 2018. This ever-changing story continues to evolve, with additional tariffs announced by the United States as we go to press in late May 2018. Given this recent dispute that has moved agriculture from the back pages to the front pages of media, Choices publishes this special issue on “U.S.-China Trade Dispute and Potential Impacts on Agriculture.” This trade dispute is important to U.S. agriculture, because China has been the United States’ top agricultural export market outside of North America since 2009 with an annual sale of nearly $20 billion in 2017 (USDA, 2018b). In 2017, top U.S. agricultural exports to China included soybeans, cotton, hides and skins for leather products, fish, dairy, sorghum, wheat, nuts and pork (USDA, 2018a).

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