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MED-Amin network
(Mediterranean Agricultural Information Network) Fostering cooperation and experience sharing among the national information systems on agricultural (cereals) markets in the Mediterranean. The network of 13 countries is coordinated by CIHEAM, and more specifically by its Mediterranean Agronomic Institute (MAI) of Montpellier.
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Researchers Working On GMO Wheat That Can Be Safely Consumed By Individuals With Celiac Illness

Researchers Working On GMO Wheat That Can Be Safely Consumed By Individuals With Celiac Illness | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

Infosurhoy, 28/02/2019 - Having celiac disease meant fewer food options for people with the condition. However, scientists have created a variety of wheat that will not only be safe to eat, but also pave the way for the development of new treatments.

In the United States, more than 2 million people have celiac disease... And there is currently no treatment for celiac disease... People who have the condition can only avoid food that triggers their symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, constipation, weight loss, fatigue, and depression/anxiety. Some take an enzyme supplement before every meal to avoid feeling sick.

However, researchers might have made a major leap forward for people who have celiac disease. A study published in the January issue of Functional and Integrative Genomics detailed a new genotype of wheat that has built-in enzymes that could break down the proteins that cause adverse effects on the body.

The researchers were able to create a new variety of wheat by introducing a new DNA into the grain. The new variety, they stated, contains enzymes from barley and a bacteria called Flavobacterium meningosepticum. These enzymes have the capacity to break down gluten in the digestive system without triggering an immune response in the small intestine.

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Evolution du rendement moyen annuel du blé France entière de 1815 à 2018 | Académie d'Agriculture de France

Evolution du rendement moyen annuel du blé France entière de 1815 à 2018 | Académie d'Agriculture de France | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

Académie d'Agriculture de france, novembre 2018

L'opinion répandue : « L’abandon des moyens mis au service de la production après 1950 tels que variétés modernes, produits de synthèse, etc... n’aurait que peu de conséquences sur la productivité du blé tendre. »

L'Académie d'Agriculture de France nous donne son analyse à ce sujet et finit par " s’interroger sur l’impact que pourrait avoir sur la productivité un abandon des variétés de blé modernes et des produits de synthèse, ce qui pourrait conduire rapidement à rendre notre pays dépendant des importations, situation qui prévalait avant 1950."

CIHEAM News's insight:

Pour en savoir plus, téléchargez le rapport https://www.academie-agriculture.fr/sites/default/files/publications/encyclopedie/repere_france_rendement_moyen_du_ble_tendre_1815-2018_vf.pdf

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Plant Breeding Innovation Benefits the Entire Wheat Supply Chain

Plant Breeding Innovation Benefits the Entire Wheat Supply Chain | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it
By Elizabeth Westendorf, USW Assistant Director of Policy This week, Wageningan University —one of the top agricultural universities in the world, located in the Netherlands —issued a press release about their research on using gene editing to produce “gluten safe” wheat so that individuals with Celiac disease can enjoy wheat products. It is possible to …
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The wheat code is finally cracked

The wheat code is finally cracked | MED-Amin network | Scoop.it

By Haley Ahlers, Kansas State University, 16/08/2018

Kansas State University scientists, in collaboration with the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC), published today in the international journal Science a detailed description of the complete genome of bread wheat, the world’s most widely-cultivated crop.

This work authored by more than 200 scientists from 73 research institutions in 20 countries will pave the way for the production of wheat varieties better adapted to climate challenges, with higher yields, enhanced nutritional quality and improved sustainability.

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