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Top 5 Takeaways from Visible Learning Institute –

Top 5 Takeaways from Visible Learning Institute – | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
This week, roles were flipped as Steven Anderson and I had an opportunity to learn from John Hattie at the Visible Learning Institute in San Diego.Hattie, a researcher in education, has studied more than 150 million students, synthesizing more than 800 meta-studies to determine the effect size various...
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Cheryl's Classroom Tips: Collective Teacher Efficacy

Cheryl's Classroom Tips: Collective Teacher Efficacy | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
Quoting John Hattie, "Teachers need to say - I cause learning." High expectations matter. Teaching is not just about the kids, the resourc...
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Visible Learning: Charting Pre & Post-Assessments with Google

Visible Learning: Charting Pre & Post-Assessments with Google | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
Check out how my students are using Google tools like Sheets, Forms, and Classroom to make learning visible!
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Deepening transdisciplinary learning through conceptual connections: A single-subject approach to exhibition | SharingPYP Blog

Deepening transdisciplinary learning through conceptual connections: A single-subject approach to exhibition | SharingPYP Blog | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
In looking for a way to deepen student understanding of concepts, while still maintaining fidelity to the single subjects, this article shows the work of the physical education (PE) department to create conceptual connections while focusing on knowledge, skills and conceptual understandings pertaining to PE and beyond. How do we integrate single subjects into the units of inquiry while maintaining the integrity of the discipline and not creating thematic units? We, as a school, felt we were missing opportunities to create conceptual connections through subject-specific central ideas, which could support and deepen student conceptual understanding. For the 2017-2018 Primary Years Programme (PYP) exhibition, we decided to try out a conceptual connection central idea in PE with the aim of deeper learning, more engagement throughout the exhibition and increased choice while simultaneously maintaining fidelity to the discipline. This year’s exhibition central idea was: “Humans shape the future through their actions”. Transdisciplinary planning began with a specialist/homeroom collaboration where we asked, “What does this look like in PE?” rather than, “How can PE support this?” One of the grade 5 teachers began thinking aloud about how sport is a great way to fight for social justice. With that, music, art, language, PE and homeroom teachers were discussing a PE connection and our creativity was sparked! After much discussion, we settled on the PE central idea: “Sports can be an avenue to promote social justice and change”. We hoped that students would see how humans can shape the future through their actions by focusing specifically on sports, social justice and change. Our provocation had to grab students’ attention and make them uncomfortable enough to want to make a change. Having just finished a games unit in which students learned basketball, we thought a Basketball Challenge was perfect. All was well until, without warning, boys’ points were worth 5 while girls’ were worth 1. “It’s not fair!” and “What is this!” were statements thrown around the court. Suddenly, one team got their basket lowered while the other remained in place. The next blow came when the two strongest players on each team were banned from shooting or scoring. “You can’t do this!” someone yelled. As the rules changed, the level of frustration rose for those students feeling the injustice and they wanted to make a change! The game was followed by a class discussion on students’ feelings and an introduction to the unit. The provocation provided the tiniest taste of injustice which allowed students to begin to empathize with our case studies who had experienced larger injustices and used them as an impetus to make big changes in the world. With each case study we used a different visible thinking routine to both deepen and assess understanding. Below are a few examples. Jackie Robinson showed us the fight for racial equality in major league baseball. We used the visible thinking routine Circle of Viewpoints and students wrote down interpretations of two pictures without knowing the background. They were shocked to find out that what they assumed was happening in the pictures was actually the opposite. This routine allowed us to see their perspectives before and after gaining new knowledge about a historical event. The questions and conversations which this sparked were immense and some students made personal connections to racial discrimination. Basketball players Bilquis Abdul-Qaadir and Darsh Preet introduced us to the right to express religion through clothing while playing sport. We tweaked the Zones of Comfort protocol to help students identify their feelings about disallowing people to wear certain clothes while playing sports and then the debate began. Brazilian football player Marta was our springboard to gender inequality. After learning about Marta’s fight students completed the below Venn Diagram. In addition to the above mentioned case studies, students explored: With each new case study, students expanded their perspectives and deepened their understanding of the exhibition’s central idea. They became more confident in taking and defending positions, and listened to varied perspectives with open minds. Some began to independently inquire into other change makers (see below). A presentation about Katherine Virginia Switzer, the first woman to run the full Boston Marathon in 1967. Questioning why women cannot play football in home nation (Pakistan) followed by discussion. Researching athletes who fought for social justice in home countries. Designing and documenting engaging assessments was a priority. Students were asked to research and write a speech about someone who had used sports to make a change or to fight for social justice. This could be based on one of our class case studies or the athlete of their choice (see student checklist here). During the unit students would also be preparing for a Mini Olympics and enhancing their skill set in high jump, long jump and 60 meter sprint. Initially we thought it would be great for the medalists to present their speeches at assembly; however, in the end, there were two passionate students (non-medalists) who were our speakers. Athletic skill would be assessed through a Mini Olympics and conceptual understanding would be assessed through the content (not delivery) of the speech. We were looking for students to show: Knowledge about facts from the time Understanding of how their case study promoted social justice or change through their actions Personal connection with the subject of their case study. Students and teachers used the same checklist to assess understanding and knowledge of the central idea. It should also be noted that throughout the unit, teachers documented learning through the collection of anecdotal notes, pictures, and the collection and presentation of visible thinking routines. We felt that the combination of the Mini Olympics for enhancing and assessing skills, as well as the presentation and research of case studies related to social justice and change, would allow us to maintain the integrity of PE while deepening their thinking of the homeroom central idea. The learning which took place in PE was evident in many exhibition projects demonstrating that the understanding of change and social justice had transcended PE. The grade 5 PE teacher stated, “It gave me a fresh perspective on teaching PE. We were able to go deeper into conceptual connections and they (the students) could see how athletics pertains to the real world.”  While there are improvements to be made, we are excited about the potential of this unit and creating other transdisciplinary units based on conceptual connections. Works Cited “April 28: Muhammad Ali refuses Army induction.” This Day in History, www.history.com/this-day-in-history/muhammad-ali-refuses-army-induction. Accessed 18 July 2018. “Circle of Viewpoints.” Project Zero, Harvard School of Education, www.pz.harvard.edu/resources/circle-of-viewpoints. Accessed 18 July 2018. Comaneci, Nadia. “Special Olympic Athletes Are Making History.” Huffington Post, 8 July 2015, www.huffingtonpost.com/nadia-comaneci/special-olympics-athletes_b_7753014.html?guccounter=1. Accessed 18 July 2018. “Jackie Robinson.” History Channel, www.history.com/topics/black-history/jackie-robinson. Accessed 18 July 2018. Litsky, Frank. “Ruth Langer Lawrence 77, Who Boycotted ’36 Olympics.” The New York Times [New York], 6 June 1999. The New York Times, www.nytimes.com/1999/06/06/sports/ruth-langer-lawrence-77-who-boycotted-36-olympics.html. Accessed 18 July 2018. Mendonca, Duarte, and James Masters. “‘Female Pele’ Marta seeks fair deal for women’s soccer.” CNN, 9 Aug. 2013, edition.cnn.com/2013/08/07/sport/football/marta-pele-brazil-pele-football/index.html. Accessed 18 July 2018. “MPower Change: Muslim Grassroots Movement.” MPower Change, act.mpowerchange.org/sign/fiba-let-them-play. Accessed 18 July 2018. “Zones of Comfort, Risk, and Danger.” School Reform Iniative, www.schoolreforminitiative.org/. Accessed 18 July 2018. Courtney Hughes is the PYP Coordinator at the American International School of Bucharest. She has been at the school for 9 years. Courtney is originally from the United States where she began her teaching career in New York City Public Schools. She sees the power of transdisciplinary learning and believes that children can do anything. Courtney is a full-time mother, wife and educator. When she has a spare moment, she enjoys working out, eating and traveling to kid friendly locations. She could never have written this article without the support and dedication of Alex Sota and Svetlana Akhundova (the grade 5 PE team). You can follow her on Twitter @cbeishline.
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I almost don’t care how teachers teach –

I almost don’t care how teachers teach – | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
How do we move the conversation away from how you teach, to the impact of our teaching.Hattie (2017) When preparing for our leadership planning day yesterday, I was investigating how to build on-g…...
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Visible Learning – Jason McKenna –

Visible Learning and the Science of How We Learn, by John Hattie and Gregory Yates, is unique because of what it spends so little time discussing: teaching.A book designed to help teachers and…...
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Why Do We Assess Students?

Why Do We Assess Students? | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
Share ThisIf you think others need to see this, share it on one of the sites below by clicking on the button.Sometimes it seems like collaborative teams of educators are on different pages when it comes to assessment.
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Help wanted: looking for research on the effectiveness of co-teaching

Help wanted: looking for research on the effectiveness of co-teaching | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
First of all: this request has nothing to do with the new myth-book we're writing, but I'm asking this because it's one of the most often asked question I receive myself lately.A few years back I already did a big search and the title of the 2001 meta-analysis on the subject was quite telling:…...
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Taking the time to think

Taking the time to think | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
Time is the most precious of resources.  It seems that we never have enough of it and the result is a feeling of constant pressure to do things quickly. As a result, we fall into a pattern of making quick decisions, with incomplete information and then proceed to take hasty action and seek short cuts. Our busy lives, the business of those around us, the schedules we set ourselves and the constant stream of distractions and interruptions ensure we have very little time to do things well and we never seem to get things done.  "Could it be though that the disruptive, 24/ 7, multi-channel communications we value so much are actually eroding our ability to think clearly, creatively and expansively?” (Lewis, 2016 p1) Against this trend towards doing more, in less time and at a faster pace is a trend towards slowing down, taking time and giving our minds time to catch up.  Once we realise that as described by Chris Lewis we are moving too fast to think, we can start looking for an alternate course of action. The obvious answer is to slow down, to pause, switch off and take the time we need to reset but doing this requires deliberate action. We begin the process by recognising that taking our time, slowing down and being deliberate in the processes of thinking is a pathway towards becoming more productive, more creative and more attuned to the world around us. In what seems like a contradiction in terms, the best strategy for coping with the rapid pace of our lives is not to speed up but to slow down.  Slow Looking by Shari Tishman In “Slow Looking” by Shari Tishman the reader finds an approach to slowing doing and taking the time needed to appreciate the finer details in the world around us.  "Slow looking is a healthy response to complexity because it creates a space for the multiple dimensions of things to be perceived and appreciated. But it is a response that, while rooted in natural instinct, requires intention to sustain." For educators, the practice of slow looking will align well with strategies from the Visible Thinking movement. If you have used strategies such as “Looking Ten Times Two” or “Look and Look Again” you have experienced slow looking. By deploying strategies which require us to switch modes and adopt a more contemplative stance backed by deliberate efforts to notice things on multiple levels, we open our minds to new possibilities. When you use these strategies with your class you will notice a new depth of thinking emerge from your students. The initial conversation may well disappoint. Surface level thinking and seeing is ingrained and takes time and persistence to overcome. As the students begin to look more closely, to see more detail and notice more of the stimulus they are engaging with a change emerges. Gradually the students embrace the opportunity that slow looking offers.  The Red Tree by Shaun Tan "The Red Tree" by Shaun Tan is a beautiful piece of creative work by a master of the picture book genre. Each page has multiple layers of detail and meaning. It is a book that deserves time and slow looking. In a unit aimed at Year Six students we invite students to immerse themselves in this text. We begin the exploration of selected pages using the slow looking strategy of “Looking Ten Times Two”. In this strategy students are invited to look at an image quietly for at least thirty seconds allowing their eyes to wander before they stop and list ten words or phrases about any aspect of the image. The process then repeats and can indeed repeat again. With each new looking more detail emerges. The students deliberately look for details they did not notice at the first looking. After two rounds of slow looking we invite the students to share their observations. As each student shares their notes, fresh ideas emerge and the discussion takes on a life of its own. Soon students are not just discussing what they saw in the image but are asking questions about the artist’s choices, the meaning of the image and their personal take-aways.  The strategies of slow looking are not restricted to the visual. Consider looking as a synonym for perceiving and you see its potential across multiple disciplines. Tishman provides numerous examples of “slow looking” in disciplines away from those most immediately associated with the visual and through senses other than our eyes. Consider the place of “slow looking” in science as an essential strategy for noticing what is taking place in an experiment or field observation. In music “slow looking” will allow the listener to notice subtle nuances in a piece and in literature “slow looking” encourages the reader to enjoy the language moves made by the author while the practice of slow looking is a valuable tool for the author to employ as they build descriptions.  'Slow Looking' is a highly recommended strategy and those looking to implement this in their classrooms or in their own lives should begin by reading Tishman’s book.  By Nigel Coutts   Lewis, C. (2016) Too fast to think: How to reclaim your creativity in a hyper-connected work culture. Kogan Page Tan, S. (2001) The Red Tree. Hachette; Australia Tishman, S. (2018) Slow Looking: The art and practice of learning through observation. Routledge; New York Related: Banishing The Culture of Busyness Making time for quiet contemplation Time- The Finite Resource
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How Group Coaching Can Build Collective Teacher Efficacy

How Group Coaching Can Build Collective Teacher Efficacy | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
Building collective efficacy is a hot topic in educational circles as a result of John Hattie’s meta-analysis of what works best in education.While many of the research-supported characteristics of collective efficacy may seem out of reach for the average teacher, one simple practice, applied …...
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Sharing good practice: Gonski and professional collaboration - Teacher

Sharing good practice: Gonski and professional collaboration - Teacher | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
Chapter three of the Gonski report discusses the value of excellent teachers, the importance of upgrading their professional practice, and the need for expert educators ‘who foster the learning growth of their students through collaboration, mentoring and continuous learning’.
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Five Practices That Accelerate Student Learning

Five Practices That Accelerate Student Learning | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
Learn how technology can accelerate learning, especially when it's used with five practices that are research-proven to help students achieve more.
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Finding the Money for Social Emotional Learning

Finding the Money for Social Emotional Learning | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
Effective SEL requires a thorough understanding of the student population’s needs, training to integrate SEL into lessons, and the instructional resources.
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Six Conditions for Implementing Visible Learning

Six Conditions for Implementing Visible Learning | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
Even though Professor Hattie’s (2009) Visible Learning synthesis provides a wealth of research that can be used by educators to inform their practice, the deep implementation of evidence-based strategies remains unrealized in many schools and classrooms.
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Excellent Collection Of “Thinking Routines” From Project Zero

Excellent Collection Of “Thinking Routines” From Project Zero | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
I’ve written several posts about Project Zero’s “Thinking Routines.” You can see many of those posts at The Best Posts & Articles About Asking Good Questions — Help Me Find More.Here are a few…...
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John Hattie Answers Your Feedback Questions Part 2

John Hattie Answers Your Feedback Questions Part 2 | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
The Visible Learning research concluded that feedback has a powerful effect on student learning. During his recent webinar, Professor Hattie asked attendees to send in their questions related to feedback.
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Research-Based Strategies that Accelerate Student Learning

Research-Based Strategies that Accelerate Student Learning | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
Want to know research-based strategies that will definitely make a difference in your students' learning? We will examine proven actions you can take today.
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Four Ways to Reenergize Your Next In-Service Opportunity

Four Ways to Reenergize Your Next In-Service Opportunity | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
If your staff didn’t have to attend your next in-service training, would they?If the training covers the 54-slide overview of ESSA changes or a new literacy initiative, I’m sure we can all guess t…...
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Feedback Without Clarity is Meaningless…At Best

Feedback Without Clarity is Meaningless…At Best | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
“Students need to know their learning target— the specific skill they’re supposed to learn— or else ‘feedback’ is just someone telling them what to do.” -Susan Brookhart Have you ever been given feedback by someone who doesn’t know your situation or your intended goals, or …...
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Question Sorts

Question Sorts | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
My engineering classes have been working on helping to design the new playground at Advanced Learning Academy.  On Thursday, the architect, landscape architect, and district Director of Constructor visited the students to explain the process and answer questions.
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10 Mindframes for Visible Learning: Teaching for Success [NEWS]

This books ( 10 Mindframes for Visible Learning: Teaching for Success [NEWS] ) Made by John Hattie About Books none To Download Please Click http://file…...
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Teacher Informal Collaboration for Professional Improvement: Beliefs, Contexts, and Experience

Teacher Informal Collaboration for Professional Improvement: Beliefs, Contexts, and Experience | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
Education Research International is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that considers scholarly, research-based articles on all aspects of education. As an international journal aimed at facilitating the global exchange of education theory, contributions from different educational systems and...
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Curriculum21 — Sketchnoting For Reflection

Curriculum21 — Sketchnoting For Reflection | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
Sketchnoting For Reflection By Silvia Rosenthal Tolisano Cross posted to the Langwitches Blog As a reader of my blog, you have followed my journey into exploring Sketchnoting since April 2014. I have come a long way by studying and learning from other sketchnoters: their techniques, their tools, their thinking process, their signature people, objects and metaphors. If have gone from asking myself WHAT can you Sketchnote? to Sketchnoting as a Form of…     I am experimenting with a variety of goals, as I am sketchnoting, wanting to be aware of how I react to each form in terms of my thinking process and learning involved. Reflection : “We don’t learn from experiences, we learn from reflecting on the experience” John Dewey Note Taking: How can we summarize main ideas visually? Visual Thinking: How can we make thinking visual and visible to others? Content Creation: How can we take concepts and content, in order to be able to share visually to appeal to a larger audience Memory Aid: Doodling triggers memory after the event has passed. Visuals beat text when it comes to remembering Process Ideation: Documenting the formation of concepts and ideas Storytelling: Conveying of events through images and text Mind Mapping: Brainstorming and organizing of ideas, thoughts and connections I am specifically intrigued by sketchnoting as a FORM OF REFLECTION. As Visible Thinking Routines (by Project Zero) have proven to be very helpful in making thinking visible, I prepared an easy to follow routine to reflect when sketchnoting. Disclaimer: this is not meant to be a one- size- fits- all reflection routine, just one of many ways one can take advantage of sketchnoting to support a reflection process.   Topic What do I know? What have I learned? How can I apply what I learned? How do I summarize in a Headline what I learned? Keywords Brainstorm keywords about the topic Objects & People How can I make my thinking visible? How can I represent an idea? Connections How does what I learned connect to what I (or others) already knew or will do Actions What conclusions will I draw? What are my goals? Another routine is Peter Pappas‘ Taxonomy of Reflection Remember What did I do, hear, watch, learn? Understand What was important about it? Apply Where could I use this again? Analyze Do I see any patterns? Evaluate How well did I do? Create What should I do next? This past week, I had the opportunity to facilitate a session about Sketchnoting for Reflection at the end of the 3 day ASCD Camp Connect21 conference in Washington, DC. It was the perfect moment to help participants become aware of their thinking and learning process as they reflected via sketchnotes of their learning experience at the conference. Next stop? How do we bring Sketchnoting for Reflection to our students as yet another tool in their toolbox. Below find a few samples of the reflection results:   Posted by Silvia Rosenthal Tolisano on August 11, 2015 in Learning, Professional Development
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Giving Effective Feedback On Presentations #1 | World of Better Learning

Giving Effective Feedback On Presentations #1 | World of Better Learning | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
In part one of two, teacher developer, Gaby Lawson, looks at how presentations can help students develop their English language skills, and shares tips for...
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Feedback and Relationships: Helping Teachers Thrive | Teaching With Soul

Feedback and Relationships: Helping Teachers Thrive | Teaching With Soul | Making Thinking Visible | Scoop.it
The Power of Feedback As an elementary school principal, I worked with amazing educators in some challenging school communities. I saw students rise to success and bring joy to their parents. Every step that I made and action that I took became critical to the success of my school. Along with the important tasks of raising test scores, maintaining a safe campus, and connecting with students and families, I also took on another important mission: building relationships with teachers. How do you build relationships while ensuring that your teachers are working hard to raise student achievement and maintaining a well-managed classroom? Administrators walk a fine line between supporting teachers and holding them accountable. As principal, I spent hours in classrooms observing and evaluating teachers. There were committed, passionate teachers as well as teachers who struggled. Then it hit me. Many of the teachers I talked with had never received any feedback about their teaching! As I began having critical conversations with my teachers, I learned that most of them, whether successful or struggling, had little insight as to how they were doing in the classroom. What? Where had their principal been? Why had no one stepped up before now to offer kudos, guidance, support, or mentoring? One thing was clear: I was one of the first principals in their career to actually attempt building a relationship. Building Relationships A principal’s role in building relationships with teachers can be challenging, but it’s necessary. Teachers are under tremendous pressure to “stand and deliver.” When this pressure reaches a boiling point, they can easily become discouraged, leave our schools, and sometimes close the door on teaching altogether. When this happens, we all lose — and the biggest loss is felt by our students, whom we’re committed to protecting and nurturing. But where was the nurturing for the teacher? In the midst of all my responsibilities as a principal, supporting and mentoring my teachers remained at the forefront of my work. Whether it was a new teacher or a seasoned vet, through formal observation or chatting over coffee in the staff room, this daily work of building relationships made a huge difference in the success of my teachers, students, and school community. Exchanging feedback with my teachers built our relationship as a team. Working as partners to lay the groundwork for their professional development mattered to all of us. Thanks to my daily walkthroughs, my teachers and I consistently worked to develop a professional learning community. Building Supportive Community Whether new or experienced, teachers need administrative support to feel that they belong to a community. The harsh reality of the classroom sometimes gets to even the most seasoned professional. Between balancing curriculum standards, supporting students’ needs, and answering parent phone calls, the work can be overwhelming. Teachers need to believe that, through the feedback from their principal and colleagues, they have a team to lean on. They need to know that when they’re struggling, there’s a supportive system in place. This system might include time to visit other classrooms to see how their colleagues are handling the same issues. It might look like time built in for new teachers to meet with their mentors for feedback on a lesson plan. It might also look like the principal covering a classroom so that a teacher can meet with a concerned parent who’s unable to come after school. Teachers often work in isolation. When they know that they work in a community and that the community has their back, it makes a big difference. The research about how teachers continue to leave our schools isn’t new, but it’s still troubling. How do we convince these teachers to stay? As an educational consultant, too often I hear from teachers about their principal’s lack of support. I know from experience that how a school principal mentors, guides, and supports teachers is critical to their success. How principals offer feedback and build relationships with their teachers can be the tipping point for whether a discouraged new teacher or frustrated veteran chooses to stay or go. I strongly believe that a school principal must work continuously to coach and mentor his or her teachers, even when that work is challenging. Using feedback as a strategy to build relationships and support teachers isn’t a new idea, but I believe it’s missing in many school systems. In this climate of teacher criticism, more teachers are choosing to leave the profession much too soon. They need to feel respected and have a good working relationship with their principal. They need to be trusted to participate in decisions about curriculum and school-based matters. We need school leaders who always carve out the time to offer meaningful, practical feedback and hands-on support so that their teachers will want to stay, thrive, and be successful. In the end, what we do (or don’t do) in our schools affects not just our teachers, but the community of children and families that we’re here to serve. This post originally appeared on InsightAdvance.com. Insight ADVANCE has developed a suite of products that connects self-reflection, coaching and peer collaboration, observation, and evaluation in one place to impact how all educators involved in teacher growth are supported. View Original >
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