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10 Change-Management Strategies That Are Backed By Science - Forbes

10 Change-Management Strategies That Are Backed By Science - Forbes | Personal development, Leadership, Effectiveness & Productivity, Health & Wellness, Continuous Improvement and Lifelong Learning. | Scoop.it

Only recently have researchers been able to use technology like functional magnetic resonance imagery (fMRI) to look at the brain and see what actually happens when we're facing a major organizational change.

Excerpts:

Change …stimulat[es] the prefrontal cortex, a section of the brain responsible for insight and impulse control. But the prefrontal cortex is also directly linked to the amygdala and that’s the brain’s fear circuitry, which in turn controls our freeze, fight or flight response. And when the prefrontal cortex is overwhelmed with complex and unfamiliar concepts, the amygdala connection gets knocked into high gear. The result is all those negative feelings of anxiety, fear, depression, sadness, fatigue or anger that change leaders observe in their teams (and often in themselves).

1. First of all, make the change familiar. ….It takes a lot of repetition to move a new or complex concept from the prefrontal cortex to the basal ganglia. Continually talking about change, focusing on key aspects will eventually allow the novel to become more familiar and less threatening.


2. Let people create change. …most people respond favorably to change they create and brain research shows why this is so. At the moment when someone chooses to change, their brain scan shows a tremendous amount of activity as insight develops, and the brain begins building new and complex connections.

 

9. Give people a stabilizing foundation. …The leader’s role here is to create stability through honoring the organization’s history, detailing current successes and challenges, and creating a powerful vision for the future. …a clearly articulated, emotionally charged, and encompassing picture of what the organization is trying to achieve.

Related posts by Deb on Strategy and Change:

   

    

   

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 23, 2016 2:40 PM

This helpful, accessible list by Carol Kinsey Goman highlights the known, tried & true overlaid with current neuroscience findings.  Carol's article is useful as a checklist to use for any type of change implementation planning.

 

It particularly resonates with my own recent training in Conversational Intelligence with Judith Glaser who reminds us that protecting ourselves is hardwired in our brains. Fear and conflict (connected to problems in change planning) "not only change the chemistry of the brain, they also change how we feel, how we behave, and how others perceive us. In a nanosecond we can move from being seen as a trusted friend and advisor to being seen as a frightening threat, a person deeply distrusted, because fear has tipped the scales that way."

 



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