IT and Leadership
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Improve Your Workplace Communication: Dealing with Difficult People at Work - AMA Playbook

Improve Your Workplace Communication: Dealing with Difficult People at Work - AMA Playbook | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Improve your office communication. This post has tips for communicating effectively at work: Includes strategies to help you deal with difficult people.
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IT and Leadership
Collection of items about information technology and leadership - especially in higher education
Curated by Steve Krogull
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Many Leaders Shrink From Straight Talk With Employees

A tough performance review is uncomfortable for the employee. But the manager on the other side of the desk is likely to feel just as squeamish about delivering the news, according to a new survey conducted online among 1,120 employed U.S. workers, 616 of whom manage employees in the workplace, by Harris Poll on behalf of Interact.

It is widely known that people thrive when given expectations and feedback. If we get it right, feedback can create collaboration, a culture of connection and sustainable change. With so much to gain, why do leaders shrink from straight talk?

Because even at the leadership level, the fear of hurting people’s feelings and facing drama and retribution can cause us to behave in a way that drums up more tension. Our own nervousness causes up to tense up and over-dramatize the conversation. We set ourselves up for a fearful response with demands like, “Come in and shut the door. I need to talk to you.” We create an environment of conflict

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To Develop Leadership Skills, Practice in a Low-Risk Environment

To Develop Leadership Skills, Practice in a Low-Risk Environment | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
It was the second day of an intensive leadership program I lead once a year and there were 20 participants in the room. Gupta and Randi* were standing in the middle of the group, opposite each other.

“I can’t do it!” Gupta insisted as Randi stood opposite him, waiting.

Earlier in the day, Gupta told me that he overheard Randi speaking about him behind his back and he was angry and hurt. In the past, in “real life,” rather than confront Randi directly, Gupta would have become passive aggressive, complaining to others behind her back and finding ways to undermine her.

I coached him to speak with her directly about it, something that was new and scary for him.
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Take 5: Cultivating Empathy in the Workplace

Take 5: Cultivating Empathy in the Workplace | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Ahhh, office drama.

A colleague, up all night with a sick child, drops the ball on a group project, angering the rest of the team. Someone else, miffed at being left out of an office happy hour, sends an aggressive email, leaving a third colleague in tears.
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4 Key Steps to Preparing for a Business Presentation

4 Key Steps to Preparing for a Business Presentation | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Being able to effectively present ideas to others is a crucial skill in many careers. But too often, honing the ability to stand in front of colleagues and deliver recommendations gets neglected in the shuffle of other more pressing priorities.
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Making Employees Compete for Rewards Can Motivate Them—or It Can Backfire

Making Employees Compete for Rewards Can Motivate Them—or It Can Backfire | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
The scheme is a classic example of relative incentives: rewards based on how an employee’s work ranks among team members, instead of absolute measures such as number of sales. These days, the best workers usually receive promotions or bonuses rather than cars or cutlery, but the premise is the same. By pitting workers against each other, the reasoning goes, relative incentives can motivate employees to work harder.

But could this strategy backfire if colleagues care about each other? After all, every additional bit of effort one person puts in reduces the chances that others on the team will win the reward. Instead of clawing for the top spot, unselfish employees might scale back their productivity to go easier on their coworkers.

“Maybe you don’t try quite as fiercely,” says Dylan Minor, an assistant professor of managerial economics and decision sciences at Kellogg.

In a series of experiments, Minor and colleagues found evidence to support that idea. They also found that a few selfish team members can change these dynamics considerably.
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How to Manage a Toxic Employee

How to Manage a Toxic Employee | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

There’s that one person on your team — the bad apple who has nothing positive to say, riles up other team members, and makes work life miserable. If you can’t fire him, how do you respond to his behavior? What feedback do you give? How do you mitigate the damage he inflicts?

What the Experts Say


There’s a difference between a difficult employee and a toxic one, says Dylan Minor, an assistant professor at the Kellogg School of Management who studies this topic. “I call them toxic because not only do they cause harm but they also spread their behavior to others,” she explains. “There’s a pattern of de-energizing, frustrating or putting down teammates,” adds Christine Porath, an associate professor at Georgetown and the author of Mastering Civility: A Manifesto for the Workplace.  “It’s not just that Joe is rude. The whole team suffers because of it.” Of course,  your first step as a manager should be to avoid hiring toxic people in the first place, but once they’re on your team, it can be hard to get rid of them. “Oftentimes the behavior doesn’t run against anything legal so you can’t fire them if others in the organization don’t agree that a line has been crossed,” Porath explains. Here’s what to do instead.

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Stop Complaining About Your Colleagues Behind Their Backs

Stop Complaining About Your Colleagues Behind Their Backs | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
In my coaching work with leaders and teams, I often ask my clients whether they engage in workplace gossip. More often than not, they respond, “of course not!” with a look on their faces that indicates that they are insulted to have been asked such a question.

But when I ask them whether they have ever participated in a “confirmation expedition” — whereby they 1) ask a colleague to confirm their own negative or challenging experience with a third colleague who is not present, or 2) welcome a similar line of confirmation inquiry from another colleague about a third colleague who is not present, most admit that this is, in fact, a regular part of their daily work life.
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Reskilling Revolution Needed for the Millions of Jobs at Risk Due to Technological Disruption > Press releases

Reskilling Revolution Needed for the Millions of Jobs at Risk Due to Technological Disruption > Press releases | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
A new report, Towards a Reskilling Revolution: A Future of Jobs for All, finds that, with 1.4 million US jobs alone expected to disrupted by technology and other factors between now and 2026, of which 57% belong to women, a huge effort is needed to safeguard workers from the Fourth Industrial Revolution

· The positive finding from the report is that with adequate reskilling, 95% of the most immediately at-risk workers would find good-quality, higher-wage work in growing job families

· Without reskilling, only 2% of workers would have an optimal opportunity to transition to new jobs – while 16% would have none at all

· Report highlights the urgent need for a massive reskilling programme, safety nets to support workers while they reskill, and support with job-matching
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To find employees, Google plans to train — and then poach — competitors' workers

To find employees, Google plans to train — and then poach — competitors' workers | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
In an effort to address an IT talent gap, Google has announced it will offer 10,000 free scholarships to American workers and students, regardless of whether they ultimately work for Google, Quartz at Work reports.
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Diversity in Hiring Doesn’t Start With Hiring | EdSurge News

Diversity in Hiring Doesn’t Start With Hiring | EdSurge News | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
The business case for building a diverse workforce is growing stronger every day. Diversity is an important aspect of any organization. In a 2018 research study, McKinsey found that the top quartile of gender-diverse companies were 21 percent more likely to experience above average profitability than companies in the bottom quartile. The Boston Consulting Group found that companies with a Blau Index (a measure of diversity) above the median experienced “38% more of their revenues, on average, from innovative products and services when compared to those companies below the median.” Diversity has also been linked with higher employee retention. Of course, there’s also a strong ethical argument to be made for diversity, equity and inclusion.

Even so, many organizations in education and beyond still struggle with diversity even while looking explicitly to hire diverse candidates. To learn more about what steps educational organizations can take to improve diversity, we sat down with Allison Wyatt, co-founder of Edgility Consulting, a leading executive search and talent consulting firm in the education space. She shared her top tips for how organizations can improve the diversity in their hiring.
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Using Compassionate Leadership to Improve Collaboration, Motivation, and Effectiveness

Having a compassionate approach to leadership does not mean lowering standards or allowing employees to make excuses for their shortcomings. It means developing an ability to see situations from other people’s perspectives and understanding their feelings.

It is at the core of effective communication, influence, motivation, and problem solving. While compassionate leadership is heart-centered and has grown with the increasing popularity of emotional intelligence and mindfulness principles, it is nonetheless a powerful method to increase work performance in a traditional sense.
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How to Speak Up in a Meeting, and When to Hold Back

How to Speak Up in a Meeting, and When to Hold Back | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
I recently spent a month interviewing the group heads of a large financial services company in order to understand how their direct reports need to communicate as they move into leadership positions. Again and again, I heard the same comment: “If you are in the room for a meeting, we expect you to speak up. Don’t wait for someone to ask you.”

In many organizations, our leadership readiness is measured in part by our willingness to speak up in meetings. How we speak off the cuff can have a bigger impact on our career trajectory than our presentations or speeches, because every single day we have an opportunity to make an impact.

While much of my work focuses on women in leadership, everyone can use meetings as an opportunity to move up in their careers — and bring others with them.

Here are three strategies for speaking up effectively, followed by three warnings for when you should hold back.
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9 Tips for Women Leaders to Convey Executive Presence.

Much of how women (and men) are perceived as leaders is tied absolutely to the way they communicate. In a male-dominated environment, particularly at senior management level, it is imperative that women learn to speak up and demand their place at the table. Without killer communication skills, women will fail to distinguish themselves.
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New National Study Conducted by Ultimate Software Reveals Need for Greater Focus on Manager-Employee Relationships

New National Study Conducted by Ultimate Software Reveals Need for Greater Focus on Manager-Employee Relationships | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Ultimate Software (Nasdaq: ULTI), a leading provider of human capital management (HCM) solutions in the cloud, announced today the results of a new national study revealing the complex differences in perception and experience between managers and the people they manage. Designed collaboratively between Ultimate Software and The Center for Generational Kinetics, the survey of more than 2,000 U.S. employees revealed that managers and employees aren’t always on the same page when it comes to their relationship. Manager relationships matter a great deal when it comes to job satisfaction and retention, and as modern employees begin to redefine expectations of an effective manager, with approachability, transparency, and honesty proving paramount.

For 93% of employees, trust in their direct boss is essential to staying satisfied at work, and over half of employees surveyed say if they aren’t satisfied at work, they can’t put forth their best effort. A good manager-employee relationship can play a significant role in retention, too: more than half of employees say they’d turn down a 10% pay increase to stay with a great boss.
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Analysis: How Bootcamps Could Disrupt Higher Ed

The Christensen Institute has weighed in on the potential for coding and computer science bootcamps to disrupt traditional higher education. In a new report, "Betting on Bootcamps," the organization, which focuses on "disruptive innovation," has offered five scenarios for the future of these short-term, workforce-aligned training programs that emphasize professional success.

The Institute used its "six-question framework" to understand the potential for disruption posed by bootcamp
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Does Your Company Actually Live Its Values?

Does Your Company Actually Live Its Values? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Few companies set out to be corrupt, or knowingly employ unprincipled people. And none want their employees’ actions splashed across newspapers, going viral for all the wrong reasons. So how can it be that—in an age of organizational values statements and corporate social responsibility—fraudulent or otherwise unethical behavior continues to persist?
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David DeSantis's curator insight, Today, 11:25 AM

Values of the staff must align with values of the organization.

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Why Bad Bosses Sabotage Their Teams

Why Bad Bosses Sabotage Their Teams | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

Jon Maner, a professor of management and organizations at Kellogg School of Management, has studied a specific breed of bad boss—those who intentionally sabotage their teams’ cohesion in order to protect their own status as leader.

Maner’s research shows that leaders will intentionally sideline high-performing team members, limit communication and social bonding among team members, or compile ill-matched teams if they think it will help ensure their own place at the top.

The danger of this type of bad boss is significant.

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Make Your Enemies Your Allies

Make Your Enemies Your Allies | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

Many well-intentioned efforts to reverse rivalries fail in large part because of the complex way trust operates in these relationships. Research shows that trust is based on both reason and emotion. If the emotional orientation toward a person is negative—typically because of a perceived threat—then reason will be twisted to align with those negative feelings. This is why feuds can stalemate trust: New facts and arguments, no matter how credible and logical, may be seen as ploys to dupe the other side. This effect is not just psychological; it is physiological. When we experience negative emotions, blood recedes from the thinking part of the brain, the cerebral cortex, and rushes to its oldest and most involuntary part, the “reptilian” stem, crippling the intake of new information.

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Why We Fight at Work

Why We Fight at Work | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Disagreements and debate at work are healthy. Fighting is not. That’s because fighting with one’s boss is just as confusing and destructive as fighting with a powerful family member. Fighting with a colleague feels like fighting with a friend or a sibling. Fighting with people who have more or less power than we do feels like bullying.

Naturally, we have to learn to deal with aggression at work. But first, we need to understand the real sources of conflict—not the textbook “struggle over resources” issues—but the underlying psychological reasons why people fight. Then, we can develop ways to engage in conflict that keep us sane, help others, and hopefully support the organization.
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With emerging technologies top of mind, CIOs must focus on talent

With emerging technologies top of mind, CIOs must focus on talent | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
At Gartner Symposium/ITxpo in Orlando, experts put emphasis on internal resources to help prepare for disruption
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A grim future for workers who don't learn new skills - 

A grim future for workers who don't learn new skills -  | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Almost 1 million Americans will see their occupations vanish entirely by 2026, and will have to train for a wholesale career change or probably not find equally paid work, according to a report by the World Economic Forum and Boston Consulting. This interactive visual shows what they found.

The bottom line: In all, some 1.4 million Americans will lose their jobs to technological change in the next eight years, including 70 percent whose job type will just disappear. Without new skills, according to the report, 575,000 of them — 41% — will have either minuscule or no chance of finding other work. Women may be disproportionately affected.
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How to overcome perfectionism in a judgmental world —

How to overcome perfectionism in a judgmental world — | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
The fear of mediocrity holds a lot of us back in our professional pursuits, as became evident at The Cut’s “How I Get It Done” conference in New York City. A running theme among the many successful entrepreneurs, activists, and artists featured at the March conference was that the key to getting stuff done is letting go of perfectionism and the need to wow other people right out of the gate.

“You don’t have to be perfect to set out on the road to accomplishing your goals,” said Topeka K. Sam, a criminal-justice reform activist, in her keynote speech. “The first step to achieving anything you want to achieve is just to start doing it and not worry that you are not good enough or that you have permission to do it.”

Natasha Lyonne, the star and co-creator of the hit Netflix series Russian Doll, offered similar advice at a panel that day. “As women, we always wanna hand in the most perfect, finished thing,” she said, describing the mindset as “you can’t pull this apart because I’ve already thought through all the angles that you’re gonna insult about it.” Lyonne said she’s had to learn to fight that instinct in order to get projects like Russian Doll made.

“There are a lot of kids out there who feel very cocksure going out into the world and showing you their half-baked idea,” she said. Part of what’s allowed her to succeed, she said, is “trusting that I can be in the middle. Do I have to be the best or the worst?”

Lyonne and Sam both make excellent points: Perfectionism often gets in the way of achieving our goals, as organizational behavior researchers Brian Swider, Dana Harari, and their colleagues concluded in a 2018 article for the Harvard Business Review. Their meta-analysis of 95 studies on perfectionism in the workplace, published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, showed that while perfectionistic employees may be more engaged and motivated, “that impact is being offset by opposing forces, like higher depression and anxiety.”
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4 Qualities of Aligned Organizations

4 Qualities of Aligned Organizations | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Imagine a company where everyone – from the CEO to the newest intern – shows up knowing EXACTLY what they need to do every single day, even on those days where plans fail and crises happen. A place where everyone pitches in and covers one another even when someone messes up in the other departments and, there is no blame, no infighting but, rather a healthy and constant agreement around how decisions are made, resources are allocated and priorities are established.

That has a name. It is called Alignment.

Aligned organizations can be truly amazing places to work. There are four characteristics that mark an aligned organization.
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New Evidence For The Success Of Comprehensive Universities

New Evidence For The Success Of Comprehensive Universities | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
The roiling wake of the elite college admissions scandal continues to yield righteous anger at higher education, multiple suggestions for reform, and even thinly disguised glee that the rich and elite are finally getting their comeuppance. Higher education is currently the Bobo doll everyone wants to punch.

In the midst of all the indignation comes a just-released report by Jorge Klor de Alva for the American Enterprise Institute that documents the remarkable success of comprehensive universities — non-elite, relatively low-tuition, not highly selective institutions — in promoting the social mobility of their graduates.
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Council Post: Executive Presence: What Is It, Why You Need It And How To Get It

Council Post: Executive Presence: What Is It, Why You Need It And How To Get It | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
“Executive presence!” It’s a term that’s often shrouded in mystique, whispered as if it’s something magical, and many people struggle to understand it. Executive presence is critical, but it doesn’t need to be mysterious. Most importantly, executive presence is a skill, not a trait — that means it’s something you can cultivate and build.

Here’s a straightforward demystification of executive presence — what it is, why you need it and how to get it.
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