IT and Leadership
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3 Types of People, Projects, and Tasks Every Leader Needs to Eliminate

3 Types of People, Projects, and Tasks Every Leader Needs to Eliminate | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

At this very moment, you have people, projects, or tasks you need to eliminate from your life. Maybe you’ve been dealing with a troubling employee situation for months, or even years, and despite your best efforts you don’t see any hope for improvement. Or maybe it’s a project that got off track months ago, but no one, particularly you, wants to admit it’s a failure and a new strategy is needed. Perhaps it’s a particular task or process you’ve maintained for years because “that’s the way it’s always been done,” but you have an inkling that if you stopped doing it tomorrow, no one would notice or care.

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IT and Leadership
Collection of items about information technology and leadership - especially in higher education
Curated by Steve Krogull
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The Shadow Negotiation - The Jazz of Negotiation

The Shadow Negotiation - The Jazz of Negotiation | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
When we sit down to negotiate, there often are two parallel negotiations going on, one explicit, the other largely tacit yet very important.

On the surface, there’s the matter at hand—the deal we’re trying to reach or the dispute we need to address. Simultaneously, through our behavior—what we do and how we do it—we’re also negotiating how to negotiate.

My colleague Deborah Kolb calls this second layer the “shadow negotiation.” (That’s the title of her superb book with Judith Williams.) The shadows are the subtext, not stated, at least not fully. Instead it’s performed in real time. Think of it as a dance. A graceful waltz in one case. In another, two circling scorpions, watching each other eye to eye. The parties’ moves can be either in or out of sync.

It is through this mutual interaction we establish the Who, What, and How of the process.
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New York issues cyber insurance framework as ransomware, SolarWinds costs mount

New York issues cyber insurance framework as ransomware, SolarWinds costs mount | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

On February 4, 2021, New York became the first state in the nation to issue a cybersecurity insurance risk framework to all authorized property and casualty insurers. In releasing the framework, New York's Department of Financial Services (DFS) said that "[f]rom the rise of ransomware to the recently revealed SolarWinds-based cyber-espionage campaign, it is clear that cybersecurity is now critically important to almost every aspect of modern life—from consumer protection to national security."

The framework applies to all property or casualty insurers that write cybersecurity insurance. However, the DFS wants all insurers, even though those that don't offer cybersecurity insurance, to "still evaluate their exposure to 'silent risk' and take appropriate steps to reduce that exposure."

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Eliminating Barriers to Business Agility with Governance

Eliminating Barriers to Business Agility with Governance | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
How do we decide what’s most valuable to the organization, and then how do we make trade-offs with scarce resources to pull from to achieve our most valued goals? 

To figure out how to deal with this and find the answers, we need some sort of governance model. Governance speaks to how we coordinate and manage the flow of work, decompose requirements, and make prioritization decisions and economic tradeoffs—all in the face of uncertainty. 

Unfortunately, our industry tends to focus on implementations at the team or enterprise level. But the reality is that, if we try to blindly implement practices like Scrum or SAFe without creating the context via things like a governance, structure, and metrics, within which our chosen method can actually work, what we end up with is a lot of methodology that isn’t actually delivering the business benefits we want. 
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Persuading the Unpersuadable

Persuading the Unpersuadable | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
We live in an age of polarization. Many of us may be asking ourselves how, when people disagree with or discount us, we can persuade them to rethink their positions. The author, an organizational psychologist, has spent time with a number of people who succeeded in motivating the notoriously self-confident Steve Jobs to change his mind and has analyzed the science behind their techniques. Some leaders are so sure of themselves that they reject good opinions and ideas from others and refuse to abandon their own bad ones. But, he writes, “it is possible to get even the most overconfident, stubborn, narcissistic, and disagreeable people to open their minds.” He offers some approaches that can help you encourage a know-it-all to recognize when there’s something to be learned, a stubborn colleague to make a U-turn, a narcissist to show humility, and a disagreeable boss to agree with you.
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Making People Better at Work, Part Four - The Dimensions of Good Knowledge Work

Making People Better at Work, Part Four - The Dimensions of Good Knowledge Work | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Deep and Shallow Work: Cal Newport’s Deep Work Rules divides knowledge work into two components

deep work, in which you are deeply focused on a core aspect of your job 

shallow work, in which you distractedly jump between elements of work, including constantly checking and answering emails and texts, preparing for and going to status meetings, and getting your social media and internet fixes while also trying to focus on the value-creating parts of your job. 

Most of us have to try and cope with huge amounts of shallow work in the form of email and message exchanges, and preparation for and attendance of business-as-usual meetings every week.  For the average entry-level manager in the US, these activities add up to 48 hours per week. Not surprisingly, overwhelm and disengagement soon follow. 
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IT Strategy Management

IT Strategy Management | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
A well-executed IT strategy provides alignment, focus, and measurability. It is the key to navigating the IT Value Journey. This series of articles describes how to develop and execute your IT strategy.
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Pay Off One Conflict Debt in Your Life

Pay Off One Conflict Debt in Your Life | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
If you’ve read my work before, you probably know about conflict debt, the idea that avoiding conflict is causing issues to pile up, attract penalties, and accumulate interest as if you were running up a hefty credit card bill. I talk frequently about the cost of conflict debt on organizational productivity, innovation, and risk management. I also fret about the cost of conflict debt on teams, trust, and engagement
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The journey of resilient leadership

The journey of resilient leadership | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Resilient organizations rapidly and successfully cycle through three phases—Respond, Recover, Thrive—not just for COVID-19 but for every crisis. Here are four actions to improve organizational resilience.
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People Who Adopt These 5 Verbal Habits in 2021 Have Very High Emotional Intelligence

People Who Adopt These 5 Verbal Habits in 2021 Have Very High Emotional Intelligence | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
I've talked with a lot of readers about self-improvement in 2021. By far, the number one thing they want to work on is improving emotional intelligence.

So, here are simple verbal habits that are designed to do exactly that. They're adapted from my free ebook, Improving Emotional Intelligence 2021.
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You Can Be a Great Leader and Also Have a Life

You Can Be a Great Leader and Also Have a Life | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Intense and all-consuming work styles are often celebrated as the only way to get to the top and be a super productive leader. But does it have to be that way? Over the last 20 years, a group of executives has been meeting and sharing innovative ideas for finding time for work, family, and life. For leaders to stand up to status quo pressures and make work-life balance a priority, the group found that they needed to cultivate skills around three relationships: learning to work differently with their teams at work, making a plan with their families to put home and family first, and shifting their own mindsets — to not only believe change is truly possible, but to give themselves permission to try, and speak up about it. The stories of three leaders exemplify how this can be done.
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How to deal with a toxic boss: 7 tips | The Enterprisers Project

How to deal with a toxic boss: 7 tips | The Enterprisers Project | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
When I tell people what I do for a living, they often respond, “My boss needs your help – they are a complete psycho.”

In reality, that’s probably not true: Psychopathy in the general population is around 1 in 100. The chances that your Network Systems Manager at the data center is a psychopath are pretty unlikely. But if you are working for someone who behaves in a bullying, combative, or otherwise toxic way, the impact on you can be devastating.

So what can you do about it? Here are some suggestions that can help you cope with a bad boss.
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Why mistakes are awesome and what to do about them

Why mistakes are awesome and what to do about them | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
I know the feeling. A supporter calls to tell you your email or letter spelled her name wrong. She’s pissed! You begin to sweat and your muscles become tense. You think to yourself – “This sucks!”


But what you really should be thinking is, “This is a terrific opportunity to make things right and build a deeper relationship with a supporter who cared enough to call.” Let’s face it, if the supporter wanted the relationship to be over, they never would have called you in the first place.

They don’t want it to end. They just want to be heard. They want you to make things right.

Yes! These events ARE opportunities disguised as complaints.
Amazon.com’s mission statement is: “To be Earth’s most customer-centric company where people can find and discover anything they want to buy online.” Jeff Bezos once said, “We see our customers as invited guests to a party, and we are the hosts. It’s our job every day to make every important aspect of the customer experience a little bit better.”

Wow! They want to be the most customer-centric company on the entire planet and they do it by behaving like hosts!

And what about Disney? Walt Disney himself once said, “Give the public everything you can give them.”

Finally, Donald Porter of British Airways said, “Customers don’t expect you to be perfect. They DO expect you to fix things when they go wrong.”

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The Power of Leaders Who Focus on Solving Problems

The Power of Leaders Who Focus on Solving Problems | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
There’s a new kind of leadership taking hold in organizations. Strikingly, these new leaders don’t like to be called leaders, and none has any expectation that they will attract “followers” personally — by dint of their charisma, status in a hierarchy, or access to resources. Instead, their method is to get others excited about whatever problem they have identified as ripe for a novel solution. Having fallen in love with a problem, they step up to leadership — but only reluctantly and only as necessary to get it solved. Leadership becomes an intermittent activity as people with enthusiasm and expertise step up as needed, and readily step aside when, based on the needs of the project, another team member’s strengths are more central. Rather than being pure generalists, leaders pursue their own deep expertise, while gaining enough familiarity with other knowledge realms to make the necessary connections. They expect to be involved in a series of initiatives with contributors fluidly assembling and disassembling.
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2021 EDUCAUSE Horizon Report® | Information Security Edition | EDUCAUSE

2021 EDUCAUSE Horizon Report® | Information Security Edition | EDUCAUSE | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
This report profiles important trends and key technologies and practices shaping the future of information security, and envisions a number of scenarios and implications for that future. It is based on the perspectives and expertise of a global panel of leaders from across the higher education landscape
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7 Ways Leaders Can Ask Better Questions | by L. David Marquet | Marker

7 Ways Leaders Can Ask Better Questions | by L. David Marquet | Marker | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

Many of today’s business leaders want to be collaborative. They want to harness the skills and independent thinking of the people on their teams to make intelligent business decisions. And yet, in my work with leaders around the world, I’ve noticed that when they attempt to collaborate with their teams, they often end up skipping the divergent part (“What does everyone think?”) of collaboration and jump straight to the convergent part (“Here’s what I think. Does everyone agree?”).'


This represents the language of too many brainstorming and decision-making meetings, where the boss states an opinion and others fall in line. They ask leading and self-affirming questions. They suppress dissent and push for consensus. In short, they are compelling instead of curious. This is not collaboration. This is all coercion disguised as collaboration.


Coercion, as I am using it here, means using my influence, power, rank, talking first, talking more, or talking louder to bring people around to my way of thinking.

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3 soft skills IT teams need in 2021 | The Enterprisers Project

3 soft skills IT teams need in 2021 | The Enterprisers Project | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Want a more engaged and productive IT team that's prepared to overcome unexpected challenges? Focus on communication, collaboration, and adaptability skills
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11 Harmful Types of Unconscious Bias and How to Interrupt Them

11 Harmful Types of Unconscious Bias and How to Interrupt Them | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
When most people think of bias, they think of a negative action taken deliberately. But there are unconscious or implicit biases that can affect your behavior or decisions without you realizing it. Unconscious biases are often based on mistaken, inaccurate, or incomplete information. These biases can have a significant impact on workplaces, shaping who gets recruited, hired, and promoted. Having an unconscious bias doesn’t make you a bad person—it just means you’re human.

It’s possible, however, to interrupt bias. The first step is awareness. Below are the most common types of unconscious bias, along with tactics you can use to ensure workplace decisions aren’t being guided by them.
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This Moment

This Moment | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
2020 was a year like no other. Before we can plan for the future, we must understand the present. Raj Chetty, Lonnie G. Bunch III, Jennifer Morris and David Brooks offer perspectives on the state of our nation as it relates to the most important topics of today.
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Reset Your Remote Management Approach

Reset Your Remote Management Approach | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
It’s time for a reset on our approach to managing remote teams. We’ve been through the spring 2020 crisis phase of trying to keep our organizations running while moving entire workforces to their home offices (or kitchen tables). We’ve survived the faux-normal phase in the fall when we were getting pretty good at working as virtual teams and tried to get productivity back to normal. We even enjoyed a brief manic phase in early January where people were rested after relatively low-key holidays and decided to start the marathon that will be 2021 as a sprint.
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How to Make Sure Agile Teams Can Work Together

How to Make Sure Agile Teams Can Work Together | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
As growing uncertainty creates an increasingly volatile business environment, agile collaboration has become more important than ever. But while these practices may sound great in theory, many companies struggle to effectively incorporate them into their operations. To make agile implementation a reality, the authors suggest four key strategies for managers: First, identify and manage the centers of your collaboration networks. Second, be sure to engage with the players on the fringes of those networks. Third, build bridges between silos within the organization. Finally, build systems into your organization to more effectively integrate and communicate between various internal and external stakeholders
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The Millennial's Guide to Managing Your Manager

The Millennial's Guide to Managing Your Manager | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
It's a truism that Millennials, as a generation, were raised differently from their older cohorts. Their parents were more likely to helicopter, less likely to be authoritarian. Their schools were all about "everyone gets a trophy" and less about "winners and losers."

As a result, Millennials often seem to have problems understanding the boss/employee relationship, which--let's face it--is pretty much stuck in the traditional, hierarchical model that characterized parenting and schooling prior to the 1980s. (The Zoomers will doubtless experience an even worse disconnect.)
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Internet 2 Community Profile-Michele Norin

Internet 2 Community Profile-Michele Norin | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
What trends do you foresee in the next few years as chief information officer?


As cloud services mature and we find ourselves relying on them more and more, it’s changing what we do. We’re evolving into a consultative-type role and becoming more service-oriented. And I think that trend—coupled with changing personal expectations about how tools should behave and how we access information—are putting pressure on us as providers to evolve. I know that my expectations as a consumer are different. I expect to get better service and get it faster, and our users also expect that. I think we’ve been grappling with that for a while.

Also, the CIO role has been morphing into more of a partner-oriented role. CIOs need to understand more and more about the goals of the organizations we serve in order to maximize the benefit we provide. You have to be able to build that bridge between the IT space and the higher-ed operation space or the health-science space. You have to understand the core of the organizational mission as much as you have to understand the IT to help decide where you should be adding technological capacity.

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Trust and Communication

Trust and Communication | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Communication is one of the most foundational skills in any organization. Leaders spend a lot of time communicating with people in their organization, yet when workers are asked what the most significant blockage is to motivation, most groups report that communication is the biggest problem.

In this brief article I will explore the relationship between how well communication works in a high trust environment versus a low trust environment.
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5 Reasons Why Following Is More Important Than Leading

5 Reasons Why Following Is More Important Than Leading | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Ask any young person, or any employee, “would you rather be a leader or a follower?” Odds are that very few if any would pick follower over leader. Yet, as a leadership scholar, I am going to argue that following is critically important, and it is even more important than leadership.
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