IT and Leadership
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Undercover CIO: What you don’t know they won’t tell you

Undercover CIO: What you don’t know they won’t tell you | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Undercover CIO is an idea I hope each of you will consider. Actually, undercover CIO is more than an idea, it's a management approach for CIO's to use in their
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IT and Leadership
Collection of items about information technology and leadership - especially in higher education
Curated by Steve Krogull
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Compassionate Leadership 101: Twelve Lessons From Business Innovators

Compassionate Leadership 101: Twelve Lessons From Business Innovators | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Compassionate leaders acknowledge our universal interconnectedness and use their influence to make a positive impact on others and the planet. These leaders are courageous, contemplative, collaborative and care about the world they will leave behind.

Over the last year, I have had the honor of covering the relatively new discipline of compassionate leadership and the process has given me the opportunity to meet inspiring people and learn from their experiences.
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Urgent HPC Can Burst Affordably To The Cloud

Urgent HPC Can Burst Affordably To The Cloud | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
One of the benefits of the public cloud is that it allows HPC centers to experiment and push the limits of scalability in a way they could never do if they had to requisition, budget, and install machinery on premises. For a fairly modest sum – at least compared to acquiring a large cluster – they can do their experiments and perhaps help us all make better economic decisions about when, where, and how we run HPC workloads.

The Clemson University School of Computing recently set a new record for HPC in the cloud by running a data intensive application on 2.14 million virtual CPUs. This breaks Clemson’s previous record of 1.1 million vCPUs, which was also set by Clemson in 2017. HPC in the cloud at scale is now a reality as the Clemson team clearly showed that any organization with approximately $50,000 in budget can build, provision, and run a cloud-based, leadership-class supercomputer for precisely as long as it takes to do a particular simulation.

The Clemson team used 2.14 million vCPUs to visually count all the cars in 2 million hours of video, which is the amount of data captured every ten days from on the interstate highway network in the southeast United States, including South Carolina where Clemson is located. The application demonstrates how decision makers can use HPC to access precise, concrete real-world data when managing events like a hurricane evacuation. More specifically, the Clemson team used 210 TB of video data to simulate the size and number of video clips created by 8,500 camera feeds over a ten day period that would be collected during an assumed region-wide disaster event. (The Omnibond TrafficVision application counted cars, but also identified accidents, stopped vehicles, and other anomalies during the experiment.)
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Landmark College expands online courses for students with learning disabilities

Landmark College expands online courses for students with learning disabilities | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Landmark College, the first institution for students with learning disabilities, is growing online courses. Here's how they're different.
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How Colleges Can Help Reverse Regional Inequality

How Colleges Can Help Reverse Regional Inequality | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Most of us know by now that the richest Americans are getting even richer. What’s less well known is that America’s richest places are getting richer too.

From 2005 to 2017, just five metro area—Boston, San Francisco, San Jose, Seattle, and San Diego—accounted for more than 90 percent of the nation’s growth in the high-tech industries driving our economy, according to a new report by the Brookings Institution and the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF). These superstar tech and innovation hubs now hold more than one in five of the country’s innovation jobs, in well-paid sectors such as tech and telecom, pharmaceutical research and advanced manufacturing. Meanwhile, much of the rest of the nation has lost its share of the economy’s best jobs.

The Brookings/ITIF findings are the latest in a spate of recent research highlighting what’s now clearly the nation’s most urgent long-term economic challenge: extreme and growing inequality between rural and urban areas. Recent research by the Economic Innovation Group (EIG) also finds increasing divergence between upwardly mobile cities and increasingly distressed rural parts of the country. This growing gulf between the geographical haves and have nots, as I’ve noted before, coincides all too well with the rise of populist discontent and increasing political polarization.
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MetaMorphle: Nine Principles For Good Design Of Organizational Change

MetaMorphle: Nine Principles For Good Design Of Organizational Change | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
In this column, I have argued that the conventional practice and theory of change management could itself benefit from some overhaul.

In the first six posts, I set out to envision organizational change in new ways. In an exercise of creative recombination, each of these posts picks a groundbreaking concept or theory from diverse scientific disciplines and professional fields and discusses its contribution to the topic of organizational change. Concepts and theories explored thus far include human agency, design thinking, motivational theory, co-creation, behavioral nudging, shared leadership theory and social network theory.
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ERP Implementations: Resolving Obstacles through Thoughtful Leadership | EDUCAUSE

ERP Implementations: Resolving Obstacles through Thoughtful Leadership | EDUCAUSE | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
It's a known fact: ERP (enterprise resource planning) implementations are very difficult, but they can be highly beneficial. When the business case development is complete, the contracts are awarded, and the fundamentals of project management are in place, the leadership team needs to prepare the project team for the rigors ahead. Resources need to be allocated and monitored. Communication and collaboration are likely to become strained. Engagement will ensure that the planning is effective, the changes are managed, and the work is interconnected. Introducing a new product requires a balance between continuing with existing operational norms and adopting new best practices. Being sure that everyone in the institution is ready and aware of the project requires effective change management and training strategy. Invariably, problems arise and require mitigating actions.

With numerous technical obstacles and sometimes intractable personnel challenges to be overcome, success is best measured a year or two after go-live. The most promising aspect about an implementation is that it fundamentally re-creates how an organization conducts its business. Ongoing excavations of old processes often reveal long-accepted deficiencies. The potential to fix these gaps is tantalizing, but this opportunity gradually collides with a practical realization that not all problems can be solved as new ones emerge. Guiding an organization through this process while managing the impact of change requires thoughtful leadership that effectively resolves obstacles
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Why Aren't More Women at the Top?

Why Aren't More Women at the Top? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Twenty-one percent. According to McKinsey, executive teams that are gender diverse are 21 percent more likely to outperform their peers. That’s a significant figure. If we needed another reason to advance women’s leadership in the C-suite, this is it.


Still, for the latest cover story of Healthcare Executive magazine, I found myself in a familiar situation of being asked by a reporter, Susan Birk, about whether women have made enough progress towards greater representation in leadership. I paused, giving it thought. Yes, women in healthcare and other industries have made strides. We know that more women are ascending to the CEO role. And for the first time all S&P 500 companies have at least one woman board member.

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Spark Team Creativity by Embracing Uncertainty

Spark Team Creativity by Embracing Uncertainty | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
As an artist who also works for a business school, I often talk with managers about how to inspire more creativity from their teams. It’s not that these managers don’t appreciate their left-brained, analytically oriented employees. On the contrary: They value their logic and practicality. Still, they lament, something is missing. Managers today seek inspired ideas, inventive solutions, ingenuity, originality, and new pathways to innovation. But their teams are not delivering.

The problem is not that professionals lack creative impulses but that they are too focused on getting the creative process right. For example, in supporting organizations that are implementing agile methodologies, I work with many teams so consumed by getting their chapters aligned or doing their sprints correctly that they miss the opportunities that spark imagination. They avoid the unknown — the uncertainty that breeds creativity.

 

So how can you help your team develop the skills to embrace uncertainty and unlock creativity? Start by setting conditions that foster a creative culture

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How Can You Be Sure Someone Has True Leadership Skills? Look for Any of These 20 Examples

How Can You Be Sure Someone Has True Leadership Skills? Look for Any of These 20 Examples | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Everything in leadership tends to be big: the vision, the strategy, and all the responsibilities. It makes the idea of improving your leadership one step at a time seem daunting. 

But progressive leaders are discovering the power of little things. Progressive leaders are finding that breaking up positive leadership actions into bite-sized daily activities can lead to better results and make all the difference.

That's what I learned from Adam Fridman, founder of ProHabits, who notes that big goals are best achieved with "micro-actions." 

These brief micro-actions that usually take no more than two minutes help you make incremental steps towards personal growth. And they're quickly changing the game of leadership development. 

According to Jenn Bleil, Vice President of Human Resources at MediRevv,  "Frequent actions to connect, coach and lead on a daily or weekly basis build credibility and show that you genuinely care. This regular connection builds trust, strengthens your relationship and establishes behaviors that can be maintained more easily than large gestures that feel forced and ingenuine."

So, if you're a leader focused on growth, committing to daily micro-actions offers an actionable growth strategy for 2020. Here are 20 micro-actions for leaders focused on growth to practice in 2020.
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Not Sure If They're Invading My Privacy or Just Really Interested in Me | EDUCAUSE

Not Sure If They're Invading My Privacy or Just Really Interested in Me | EDUCAUSE | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
An analysis of 2019 ECAR student and faculty data reveals that neither faculty nor students have a strong understanding of how their institution uses their personal data; faculty have less confidence in their institutions' abilities to safeguard private data than students do.
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Preparing the Enterprise of Kubernetes —

Preparing the Enterprise of Kubernetes — | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
I know, I know. I hate Kubernetes. Why am I talking about it so much? Because it’s a great technology to expose the challenges that most organizations face. Kubernetes was designed to host stateless processes. If Netflix needs a surge in video encoders or streamers, Kubernetes orchestrates the provisioning of thousands of container instances almost instantly. When demand has subsided, those instances disappear.

Traditional enterprise applications aren’t designed to operate in that fashion. For example, application servers in legacy design keep some type of configuration state in the application server. If you’ve ever had to load balance across a set of application servers that wanted to “own” the application session, you’ll understand why you can’t simply containerize application server of a 3-tier monolithic app.

So, what if you do have a bunch of stateless application components you’d like to containerize and adopt cloud-native operations to those systems? I sat down with Damani Corbin to talk about where I believe the gaps are in Kubernetes maturity and what Damani has seen in his travels as a Kubernetes expert helping companies deploy Kubernetes at scale.
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Why Are Some Leadership Development Programs Such Train Wrecks?

Why Are Some Leadership Development Programs Such Train Wrecks? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
While studies have shown that diverse leadership teams are correlated with better financial performance, many organizations have struggled with how to actually get the most out of those diverse teams in a way that drives better performance.  

And an ongoing problem in this quest was revealed last month when EY’s women’s development initiative received less-than-favorable coverage in the news. With advice about how to dress, discussions of pancake and waffle brains, and concerns that women talk too much, the training was anything but inclusive.

This was unfortunate for EY. And it was fortunate that other corporations’ programs weren’t subjected to the same scrutiny as they wouldn’t have fared so well either. As someone who has sat in on too many programs like this one, I recognized the material and the underlying problem with ease.

You see, these programs are designed with an eye towards diversity—incorporating more kinds of people to the company—but they are not designed towards inclusion—actually welcoming and incorporating and valuing different styles of work, management, and leadership in the pursuit of better performance.
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Being Genuine Is The Greatest Career Strategy Of All

Being Genuine Is The Greatest Career Strategy Of All | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
To be a leader who is true to his or her own self—and to encourage others to do the same—requires a commitment to be genuine that extends from social media to personal interactions to performance measurement and compensation and finally to corporate culture itself.

This implies that being genuine is more important than any specific set of desired behaviors. As Wharton researcher Julianna Pillemer writes, “There may be clear organizational expectations for desired behaviors, and there’s a potential downside to acting in a way that’s actually genuine.”

Pillemer cites a consultant friend who perfectly encapsulated this challenge by saying, “Now not only do I have to deliver a perfectly polished presentation, but then go out for drinks with the client, seem like a really fun, genuine person, and tell them all about my life.”

The way out of this perceived trap revolves around a single word: to be genuine rather than to seem genuine.
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Why build a community of practice?

Why build a community of practice? | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
In open organizations, fostering passionate communities can increase collaboration, accelerate problem solving, and lead to greater innovation.
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Your Unconscious Bias Trainings Keep Failing Because You’re Not Addressing Systemic Bias

Your Unconscious Bias Trainings Keep Failing Because You’re Not Addressing Systemic Bias | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
It seems like every other day the headlines are marred with stories of companies adopting unconscious bias trainings to overcome issues of racism, prejudice, bias and discrimination. Unconscious bias trainings have become the cure-all for every diversity-related ailment that organizations are facing but why after all the money expended, inequities continue to persist in today’s workplaces? The focus of unconscious bias training is typically on helping individuals understand and recognize their own unconscious and intrinsic biases and suggesting behaviors to mitigate the preconceptions we are prone to. What unconscious bias trainings don’t account for are the systemic and structural issues (SSI) that allow biases to be perpetuated in the workplace. These are the unfair policies, the differences in opportunities and inequitable treatment that allow bias to persist. While it is equally as important for individuals to be aware of their own blind spots and stereotypes and how these impact behaviors and decision-making, unconscious bias training and diversity and inclusion workshops should also address these SSIs that are insidious and allow bias to manifest at a greater level. What are some of these SSIs and how can organizations deconstruct these oppressive systems to make for a more inclusive and equitable workplace?
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What Instructors Can Learn From Improv

What Instructors Can Learn From Improv | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

Creative people bring fresh insights to difficult problems. They cope with uncertainty and change. They build new things. They are equipped to succeed at work and in their lives more broadly.

Here’s the good news for colleges: While creativity is often seen as an innate ability, experts say it’s a skill that can be taught. A growing number of colleges are making a point of developing students’ creativity, often in the form of a signature program in which they tackle an open-ended problem as an interdisciplinary team.

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The Way to Influence Executives –

The Way to Influence Executives – | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
In this conversation, Nancy and I discuss the realities of executive life, how executives are measured, and why you should expect to be grilled when briefing them. With intentional preparation, you’ll be prepared to more successfully influence executives both inside the organization — and with your customers.
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Moving a Taxonomy of Inclusive Design from Theory to Practice | EDUCAUSE

Moving a Taxonomy of Inclusive Design from Theory to Practice | EDUCAUSE | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
In our November 15 Transforming Higher Ed blog post, we consulted the collective intelligence of EDUCAUSE Review readers by asking you to share how you define inclusion.1 Your responses did not disappoint. We learned that in education, inclusion is both a set of practices and an intended outcome of course design, regardless of the structures used to deliver instruction.

Using this conceptual framework to inform our discussion around inclusive design, a logical next step is to consider how we might put disclosure, accessibility, and inclusion into practice. Fortunately, many conversations are happening in our community of practice around "good" teaching, particularly in an age of digitally enhanced and online/blended teaching and learning. These conversations include the following research-based and practitioner-endorsed practices (in addition to online/blended quality assurance efforts)
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Digital Agility: Embracing a Holistic Approach to Digital Literacy in the Liberal Arts | EDUCAUSE

Digital Agility: Embracing a Holistic Approach to Digital Literacy in the Liberal Arts | EDUCAUSE | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
A group of institutions is collaborating to identify what digital agility means in the liberal arts and to encourage the use of that definition to guide institutional initiatives that involve digital agility.
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There Are Many Wrong Ways To Set Stretch Goals: 3 Skills To Keep You On The Right Path

There Are Many Wrong Ways To Set Stretch Goals: 3 Skills To Keep You On The Right Path | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Many leaders, when faced with the objective of setting a stretch goal, simply multiply goals by two. Leaders need to understand that the skill of correctly setting stretch goals requires three critical skills: Push, Pull, and Problem Solve.
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3 Factors to Consider in Developing Your College Esports Program | EdTech Magazine

3 Factors to Consider in Developing Your College Esports Program | EdTech Magazine | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Seldom does a week go by without a new development in the world of collegiate esports. Most of these reports focus on the surge in popularity of this pastime on college campuses across the country. But as collegiate esports matures and novelty fades, those institutions that weren’t early to the party will face an important decision: To what extent should they invest in esports on campus? 

While the enthusiasm around esports is undeniably enticing, it’s important to look beyond the hype to address three less-discussed factors that institutions should consider when developing or growing esports programs. 
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How to be a better organization: Top 10 reads for leaders

How to be a better organization: Top 10 reads for leaders | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Modern organizations are adopting key elements from open source software. By leveraging the "open" in open source, leaders can help shape a more responsive and productive enterprise. Check out these top 10 articles from 2019 that can help you develop your own path in open leadership.
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Boss on the Hot Seat

Boss on the Hot Seat | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
Who’s the boss of the future? What must she be able to do? Should she expect more chaos, or is more stability possible? Should she invest in control and management, or should she rely on trust? Is there one answer? Do we even need one? Or do we perhaps today need more of everything in our parallel and simultaneous society?

Due to complexity and speed, more pressure lies on managers and organizations to make rapid and clear decisions. The boss can no longer do it alone because the complexity is simply too high. Today it is all about getting the work done together. But many managers stand in their own way. They lack self-awareness, trust and the ability to change their own perspective. Many are driven by reactions, and the frustration is often let out on employees. “The boss should be the one to judge, he bears the responsibility”—that is the perception, though the success-factors of business in the 21st century lies elsewhere. Managers must now become leaders or risk becoming obsolete. Artificial intelligence (AI) and “the project” are the new and true bosses. The task is to navigate through “wild knowledge”, the unknown unknown or the unknown knowns (what you didn’t know that you know). The role of “the boss” is now on the hot seat.
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ITSM Trends in 2020 – the Crowdsourced Perspective

ITSM Trends in 2020 – the Crowdsourced Perspective | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it
So, what should you be doing with your organization’s IT service management (ITSM) capability next year? Have you been looking for inspiration and advice elsewhere – maybe the raft of “ITSM in <>” articles that appear at this time of the year? However, not everyone has the time to write an “ITSM in 2020” post, so this article brings together the 2020 opinions of a variety of people from 18 ITSM tool vendors and two support-professional membership bodies. These are people who have, if you stop to think about it, their fingers on the pulse of what’s happening in the ITSM industry right now – taking onboard inputs from their customers, their own employees and partners, and analyst firms and other advisory services.
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Advocates for student learning assessment say it's time for a different approach

Advocates for student learning assessment say it's time for a different approach | IT and Leadership | Scoop.it

Ask the many assessment haters in higher education who is most to blame for what they perceive as the fixation on trying to measure student learning outcomes, and they are likely to put accreditors at the top of the list.

Which is why it was so unexpected last week to hear a group of experts on student learning tell attendees at a regional accreditor's conference here that most assessment activity to date has been a "hot mess" and that efforts to "measure" how much students learn should be used help individual students and improve the quality of instruction, not to judge the performance of colleges and universities.

The session took place at the Academic Resource Conference, the annual gathering of the WASC Senior College and University Commission, which accredits institutions in California, Hawaii and the Pacific Islands. The panel's title built off the conference's theme of "provocative questions and courageous answers," and asked, in regard to teaching, learning and assessment, "is higher education accomplishing what it said it would?"

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