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‘On-Ramps’ Can Connect Most Vulnerable Learners to Good Jobs | EdSurge News

‘On-Ramps’ Can Connect Most Vulnerable Learners to Good Jobs | EdSurge News | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Changes in the economy, technology and the future of work are already having broad implications—but the benefits are not distributed equally.

Put simply, education resources are scarce for the working class. Today, the federal government invests $139 billion in postsecondary education, of which the lion’s share is for financial aid for those who are enrolled in undergraduate degree programs. Out of the $170 billion that employers invest in formal training each year, the majority of that funding (58 percent) is channeled toward workers who have already earned bachelor’s degrees and work in higher-paying professional and managerial positions. In fact, we are already leaving behind a significant swath of our population, who are not prepared for a shifting job market and who are not well served by traditional colleges that expect learners to stop their lives and come to campus for long periods of time.
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iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education
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"Learning in the Making: How to Plan, Execute, and Assess Powerful Makerspace Lessons" Awessome New Book by Jackie Gerstein @JackieGerstein @makered

"Learning in the Making: How to Plan, Execute, and Assess Powerful Makerspace Lessons" Awessome New Book by Jackie Gerstein @JackieGerstein @makered | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it

"Making is a dynamic and hands-on learning experience that directly connects with long-established theories of how learning occurs. Although it hasn't been a focus of traditional education or had a prominent place in the classroom, teachers find it an accessible, exciting option for their students.

The maker movement brings together diverse communities dedicated to creating things through hands-on projects. Makers represent a growing community of builders and creators—engineers, scientists, artists, DIYers, and hobbyists of all ages, interests, and skill levels—who engage in experimentation and cooperation.


Transferring this innovative, collaborative, and creative mindset to the classroom is the goal of maker education. A makerspace isn't about the latest tools and equipment. Rather, it's about the learning experiences and opportunities provided to students. Maker education spaces can be as large as a school workshop with high-tech tools (e.g., 3D printers and laser cutters) or as small and low-tech as the corner of a classroom with bins of craft supplies. Ultimately, it's about the mindset—not the "stuff.

In Learning in the Making, Jackie Gerstein helps you plan, execute, facilitate, and reflect on maker experiences so both you and your students understand how the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of maker education transfer to real-world settings. She also shows how to seamlessly integrate these activities into your curriculum with intention and a clearly defined purpose."

John Evans's insight:

I have learned and shared so much from Jackie Gerstein in the past few years! You'll want to add this book to your school and personal library! JE

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Build skills for 2030 now with these ideas - Getting Smart

Build skills for 2030 now with these ideas - Getting Smart | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it

The start of a new school year is a great time to think about long-term plans for the upcoming year, but also the plans we need to make for our students for years to come. Each day there are news alerts on topics such as artificial intelligence and machine learning, augmented and virtual reality, digital citizenship and literacy and their relation to education. These are the trends and terms that are already a part of our world and will become an increasing part of our future.

Beyond these technology-themed trends, we’re learning more about social-emotional learning (SEL), mental health awareness, mindfulness and trauma-informed teaching. These are important issues and educators must stay informed on best practices and ways to make these ‘themes’ part of our daily practice.

As educators today, it’s no longer about simply planning instruction with our students in mind. We also have to consider how changing technology trends and important societal issues will impact our students both now and beyond high school. How can we best prepare them to not only find success for themselves but also make an impact on others? So the pressure is on, to really consider how we can best prepare students not just for this school year, not just for life after high school graduation, but well beyond. We need to prepare our students for the year 2030 and the future. But how?


Via Edumorfosis
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What a 9 Year Old Taught Me About #STEM Education – Erick Hanson @erickhanson via @heathermlister #makered

What a 9 Year Old Taught Me About #STEM Education – Erick Hanson @erickhanson via @heathermlister #makered | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
I can’t stop thinking about Caine’s Arcade.

If you haven’t seen it, you gotta check it out. It’s a bit dated – 2012 is ancient history in the EdTech world – but to date, this YouTube video has over 8 million views. Caine’s Arcade is still inspiring people everywhere.

If you still haven’t seen it, then let me break it down for you. Caine, a nine-year-old boy hanging out at his dad’s auto parts store in a rough East LA neighborhood, had an idea to use the stuff lying around – mostly used cardboard – to create his own arcade. One particularly inspired customer stumbled upon it and…well, just go watch the video. Trust me, it’s worth your time.


I love this story because it reminds me about the power of STEM and how easy it can be to implement if you’re keeping your eye on the goal. When we educators aim to inspire and empower our students to do something great, we’ll find that often, we can deliver some life-changing learning experiences without breaking the bank on sophisticated robots and bleeding-edge technology.
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Micro:bit Wireless Trivia Buzzer System | TeachOntario

Micro:bit Wireless Trivia Buzzer System | TeachOntario | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it

"Students often enjoy playing trivia style games for consolidating and solidifying understanding of course content. The micro:bit, which is prevalent in the global education community and is now available in many schools, can add a physical dimension to trivia games, and can provide students with an opportunity to program digital learning tools that they can use within their classrooms.

Christian Landy, a newly qualified teacher and recently hired Occasional Teacher in the Thames Valley District School Board (TVDSB), has shared his trivia game idea, as well as the code for students and their teacher to upload onto micro:bits. The code, which Christian has created using the block editor in MakeCode.com, programs micro:bits to become a buzzer system for a trivia game, complete with a game master and contestants."

 

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10 Important Books to Help Kids Learn Coding

10 Important Books to Help Kids Learn Coding | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education...

Via Karen Bonanno
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, September 10, 2:34 AM

Check this out! Thanks to Yashy Tohsaku. 

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#Fake #news game confers psychological resistance against #online #misinformation - Nature

#Fake #news game confers psychological resistance against #online #misinformation - Nature | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
The spread of online misinformation poses serious challenges to societies worldwide. In a novel attempt to address this issue, we designed a psychological intervention in the form of an online browser game. In the game, players take on the role of a fake news producer and learn to master six documented techniques commonly used in the production of misinformation: polarisation, invoking emotions, spreading conspiracy theories, trolling people online, deflecting blame, and impersonating fake accounts. The game draws on an inoculation metaphor, where preemptively exposing, warning, and familiarising people with the strategies used in the production of fake news helps confer cognitive immunity when exposed to real misinformation. We conducted a large-scale evaluation of the game with N = 15,000 participants in a pre-post gameplay design. We provide initial evidence that people’s ability to spot and resist misinformation improves after gameplay, irrespective of education, age, political ideology, and cognitive style.

 

Game Site: https://getbadnews.com/#intro

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To All the Teachers I've Ever Had, I Can't Thank You Enough | Community via @andrewmead73

To All the Teachers I've Ever Had, I Can't Thank You Enough | Community via @andrewmead73 | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Teaching is hard. Anyone who believes otherwise has either never met a teacher, or clearly wasn't paying attention during their 13+ years inside of a classroom.
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10 Reasons Why Primary Teachers Are Rockstars - Education to the Core

10 Reasons Why Primary Teachers Are Rockstars - Education to the Core | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Primary teachers are some of the most amazing people to walk this planet.  In fact, I consider primary teachers to have rockstar status.  Don’t get me wrong, I am not forgetting the fabulous middle and secondary teachers. I could seriously write a whole new post about how great ya’ll are!   But today, I am focusing on primary teachers because that’s where my experience lies.  So, for your entertainment, humor, and reading pleasure, I present to you: 10 Reasons Why Primary Teachers Are Rockstars.
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Best Reading Websites and Apps for Early Readers

Best Reading Websites and Apps for Early Readers | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
We know that exposure to letters, words, sentences, and books (both read alouds and independent reading) significantly impacts a student’s future successes in school and life.

We also know that students learn better when they are engaged, which is why teachers (and parents) are continually seeking to find tools and teaching methods that will draw students in and sustain their interest over time, and there is no doubt that technology has proven itself as an engaging tool for learners. While I am not one to advocate for screens in place of books, I can see the benefits of using quality, educational screen-based sources as one tool to improving a young learner’s development – whether this be in the form of websites, apps or television viewing. Quality most definitely matters.
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Erica Casas Esquivel's curator insight, September 9, 10:13 PM
It has become more challenging to engage early readers and teach them the reading skills they need. They have become accustomed to a life with technology at their fingertips. Sometimes it is necessary to supplement our lessons with educational apps. These are some great apps for teaching reading skills to early readers that have been approved by teachers. I already tried out Teach My Monster to Read. It was very fun and entertaining. 
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What Is a Laser Cutter? – Simply Explained - All3DP

What Is a Laser Cutter? – Simply Explained - All3DP | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it

"As their name suggests, laser cutters create patterns and designs by cutting into materials. A powerful laser beam is the source that melts, burns, or vaporizes the material.

Essentially, laser cutting is a fabrication process that uses a thin, focused, laser beam to cut and etch materials into custom designs, patterns, and shapes as specified by a designer. This non-contact, thermal-based fabrication process is ideal for several materials, including wood, glass, paper, metal, plastic, gemstone, and is capable of producing intricate parts without needing a custom-designed tool."

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Makerspaces A to Z: Impactful - Worlds of Learning @LFlemingEDU 

Makerspaces A to Z: Impactful - Worlds of Learning @LFlemingEDU  | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Makerspaces that are impactful are not a new idea, in fact, I have written before about this Maker Care program, created by Islip, NY Library Media Specialist, Gina Seymour.  Over the past year, I also have discovered the work of Steve Sostak and Aaron Moniz, of Inspire Citizens who through their Empathy to Impact approach, help infuse the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, global competence frameworks, and media literacy into project-based inquiry, design thinking, curricular standards, language objectives, and 21st-century learning. With their work in mind, I launched a makerspace initiative in Nigeria, Making the SDGs, in partnership with my friend and colleague, Jacob Sule, which aims to empower and support students/youths in rural Nigeria to help to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, through a network of makerspaces.
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The Scientific Debate Over Teens, Screens And Mental Health | MindShift | KQED News

The Scientific Debate Over Teens, Screens And Mental Health | MindShift | KQED News | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
More teens and young adults — particularly girls and young women — are reporting being depressed and anxious, compared with comparable numbers from the mid-2000s. Suicides are up too in that time period, most noticeably among girls ages 10 to 14.

These trends are the basis of a scientific controversy.

One hypothesis that has gotten a lot of traction is that with nearly every teen using a smartphone these days, digital media must take some of the blame for worsening mental health.

But some researchers argue that this theory isn't well supported by existing evidence and that it repeats a "moral panic" argument made many times in the past about video games, rap lyrics, television and even radio, back in its early days.

To understand both sides of the debate, I talked in detail to three researchers: one who argues that teens' use of tech is a big problem, one who thinks the danger is exaggerated and an expert in research methodology who suggests the connection may not be so simple.
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Free Technology for Teachers: Bad News - Interactive Simulation Shows Students How Misinformation is Spread

Free Technology for Teachers: Bad News - Interactive Simulation Shows Students How Misinformation is Spread | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it

"Bad News is a website that offers simulations that show visitors how misinformation is spread through social media. Bad News is available in two versions. The regular version is intended for those who are high school age or older. Bad News Junior is appropriate for middle school and older elementary school students. The difference between the two versions is found in the news topics that are used in the simulations."

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Janet Vasil's curator insight, August 31, 10:29 AM
Digital Media Literacy is a vital 21st Century skill and one of my passions.  We must be skeptical and vigilant about what information, images, video, etc., we trust and accept as accurate online. Just because something is trending or popular on social media or spreading around the internet does not make it true or factual.
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Mission Daily: Identifying Fake News with Molly McKew, Information Warfare Expert

Mission Daily: Identifying Fake News with Molly McKew, Information Warfare Expert | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
"In the U.S, we're a very optimistic, open-minded population, and that's great, but it also makes us susceptible to false campaigns. We need to step it up in terms of helping our nation be more aware of this." — Molly McKew

The term “fake news” gets thrown around a lot in today’s media. Using social media as its main conveyor, misinformation spreads like wildfire to reach the most receptive audiences. Why do people fall prey to fake news stories, and how can we identify them? 

To answer these questions, we are joined by Molly McKew, CEO of Fianna Strategies, a consulting firm that advises governments, political parties, and NGOs on foreign policy and strategic communication. Molly has acted as a foreign policy and strategy consultant, as well as a Russia expert for governments in Central Europe and advisor to political parties in Georgia and Moldova.

Stephanie and Molly dig deep into finding the truth behind different types of fake news campaigns. Ultimately, it’s not always about the information spread; it’s about the why behind it’s spread.

"I think the key thing to figure out is the origin point. It's not really about what is true or not; it's what is the purpose of that information at that exact time." 

On this episode of Mission Daily, Molly, an information warfare expert, joins Stephanie to discuss disinformation campaigns. She also talks about the power of social media in the spreading of fake news, how to identify fake campaigns, and much more.
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Knowing how fake news preys on your emotions can help you spot it | CBC News

Knowing how fake news preys on your emotions can help you spot it | CBC News | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
A federal election is coming and Canadians should be wary of being exposed to fake and misleading news, particularly on social media.

What you need to look out for most during this election cycle is your own emotional bias. This is what leads us to share fake news without checking the facts first. 

We have been researching the psychology of fake news for almost three years now, with the goal of finding out why people believe fake news and what each of us do to avoid falling for it ourselves. We have uncovered a few answers; one of the most important of which was recently detailed in a paper titled Reliance on Emotion Promotes Belief in Fake News.