Inquiry Learning
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OPEDUCA Inquiry Based Learning

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The OPEDUCA Project is a brilliant product created with the vision that Anytime, Anyplace, with Anybody and through Any device learning can take place. It is a local to global co-operative effort to support a global movement to student-centred learning where students can explore the world, its cultures and histories to become empowered. The value in this website was found in Chris Lehmann and Tracy Sali's perspectives on why inquiry based learning is worth the trouble and why educators are fearful of implementing it. This directly linked to my research as I explored teacher efficacy when implementing inquiry learning. However, it was reading the phrase “To me it comes down to process,” Lehmann said. “Inquiry means living in the soup. Inquiry means living in that uncomfortable space where we don’t know the answer" that highlighted the importance of working with discomfort to reach new achievements and develop a community of development rather than simple achievement. 

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Insight on Inquiry: Starting the Year in Kindergarten

Kindergarten teacher Carol Stephenson brings us inside her classroom to share how she fosters inquiry-based learning at the very beginning of the schoo
Amelia Bassett's insight:

One of my own personal challenges when employing inquiry learning is to try to conceptualise my students' understanding. Where are they going to start? Is this going to be too difficult? As this continues, I find myself flitting between deciding to try an aspect of inquiry and then the reasons why not to try. Time and time again I've stated that if students are not given the opportunity to demonstrate their ability or to learn a skill, they never will. I especially believe this in terms of vocabulary. If they do not learn the word, how will they learn to use it? What I hadn't realised, however, was that my own discomforts around inquiry learning and providing a valuable inquiry learning experience were just robbing my students of what I was trying to implement. As I watched this clip of the fabulous Carol Stephenson, ideas immediately sprang to mind. Then I faced the question of, "Okay, but how does this align to the curriculum?" 

This is the crucial part, you see. So, as I listened to Carol, I started considering possibilities. Carol mentioned one word concepts, she spoke of "mini beasts," trees, animals and space. Immediately I aligned these inquiry topics to the science units from earlier this year. If I created an integrated unit, I could use thematic aspects to support my brilliant learners to have an even broader understanding and enriched learning experience. That's the magic of Carol Stephenson and why this video is worth a Scoop. 

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Theoretical Foundations of Learning Environments

Theoretical Foundations of Learning Environments | Inquiry Learning | Scoop.it
Theoretical Foundations of Learning Environments provides students, faculty, and instructional designers with a clear, concise introduction to the major pedagogical and psychological theories and their implications for the design of new learning environments for schools, universities, or corporations. Leading experts describe the most important contemporary theories that form the foundation of the conception and design of student-centered learning environments and new applications of educational technologies. This book is well suited as a textbook for courses in instructional design, educational psychology, learning theory, curriculum theory and design, and related areas. The rise of constructivism and its associated theories represented a paradigm shift for educators and instructional designers to a view of learning as necessarily more social, conversational, and constructive than traditional transmissive views of learning. This bestselling book was the first to provide a manageable overview of the altered field, and the second edition has been fully updated to include expert introductions to Metacognition, Argumentation, and other key contemporary theories.
Amelia Bassett's insight:

I have chosen to include this source as it references a characteristic which is indicative of effective inquiry instruction: self-regulatory skills and metacognition. One of the many questions I had regarding inquiry learning included the interactions I should have with students. How should I support them? What would support them best in an environment where they are self-regulating to manage their learning? This text referenced key words which resonated within me and then prompted further thought. These were planning, reflection and learning goals. Within an early phase classroom, I frequently incorporate opportunities for students to develop their planning, reflection skills and create learning goals. By combining this understanding with Bloom's Taxonomy, I am better able to support my students develop their metacognition in a student-centred inquiry learning environment. 

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Preservice and practicing teachers’ self-efficacy for inquiry-based instruction

Preservice and practicing teachers’ self-efficacy for inquiry-based instruction | Inquiry Learning | Scoop.it
(2016). Preservice and practicing teachers’ self-efficacy for inquiry-based instruction. Cogent Education: Vol. 3, No. 1, 1236872.
Amelia Bassett's insight:

This brilliant resource highlights to the reader the research that supports inquiry learning and how knowledge and understanding creates a community of teachers more willing to employ inquiry learning within their classrooms. This specifically relates to my first "mystery" which centered on teacher efficacy when employing inquiry learning. The reason I've "scooped" this source is due to my own experiences seeing the discomfort of professionals when asked to adopt a particular concept that is unfamiliar. As seen in the abstract of this source, teacher disposition was not affected by years in the profession, maximum degree or prior education or work experiences, but rather knowledge and experience within inquiry learning. Interestingly, the author also references teacher interpretation of challenges. Which when conflated with Bandura's theory of self-efficacy, goes to show the need for confidence within one's ability to effectively implement a new or unfamiliar concept or strategy. 

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OPEDUCA Inquiry Based Learning

Amelia Bassett's insight:

The OPEDUCA Project is a brilliant product created with the vision that Anytime, Anyplace, with Anybody and through Any device learning can take place. It is a local to global co-operative effort to support a global movement to student-centred learning where students can explore the world, its cultures and histories to become empowered. The value in this website was found in Chris Lehmann and Tracy Sali's perspectives on why inquiry based learning is worth the trouble and why educators are fearful of implementing it. This directly linked to my research as I explored teacher efficacy when implementing inquiry learning. However, it was reading the phrase “To me it comes down to process,” Lehmann said. “Inquiry means living in the soup. Inquiry means living in that uncomfortable space where we don’t know the answer" that highlighted the importance of working with discomfort to reach new achievements and develop a community of development rather than simple achievement. 

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Visible learning

Visible learning | Inquiry Learning | Scoop.it
The Continuum of Self-Efficacy is about building self-esteem, becoming self-confident and persevering to achieve any goal set.
Amelia Bassett's insight:

Following professional development opportunity "Mindset: Unlocking Student Potential" I suddenly became of the opportunities I was providing my students to experience and navigate the curriculum while encountering difficult situations that are necessary for new neurological pathways to be formed as they problem-solve and seek new ways of working and thinking. This particular resource was found when searching for self-efficacy and inquiry learning on Pinterest. In particular, I see the characteristics of learners and connection to teacher-centred, learner-centred and learner-driven to provide a simple guide of behaviours that may be evident in the classroom. In order for a heightened sense of self-efficacy Bandura references mastery. I believe that by recognising needs of students and catering for these needs to support students to become better at self-regulatory skills, teachers in turn will feel successful and be more willing to employ inquiry learning. 

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First-year Teachers' Uphill Struggle to Implement Inquiry Instruction: Exploring the Interplay Among Self-Efficacy, Conceptualizations, and Classroom Observations of Inquiry Enactment.

Amelia Bassett's insight:

As a second year teacher, I find myself frequently searching for research to support my continued development which also lends itself to supporting teachers in the beginning stage of their career. I was searching for a particular perspective where an article would state circumstance that was relevant to where I am in my career. I found this particular article met these needs and referenced where beginning teachers fall short. These included, unmet ideals, perceptions of constraints, and functioning as a teacher in survival mode. What I found most fascinating and what I was looking for was proof of my theory linking self-efficacy, perceptions and inadequate performance. This article links few teachers routine use of inquiry learning due to perceptions of curriculum and time demands, insufficient knowledge and understanding of either the curriculum or inquiry based instruction and poor confidence. For this reason, I stand firm on my statement that teachers require professional development opportunities to improve their knowledge, understanding and self-efficacy to better employ inquiry learning. 

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QCAA - Inquiry Learning: Information for Teachers

Inquiry Learning: Information for teachers

Amelia Bassett's insight:

The Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority has produced an information fact sheet for teachers as a support resource for when implementing inquiry learning. I believe this to be a brilliant tool to have in the classroom to provide insight to teachers regarding the efficacy of inquiry learning and how teachers can broaden and enhance their understanding of inquiry learning to provide a more authentic and comprehensive experience for students. This particular source provides overarching ideals and characteristics of inquiry learning, examples of what inquiry learning could include and what qualities of age-appropriate pedagogies should be evident within inquiry learning. This in itself supports teacher efficacy due to the simplistic nature of evidence regarding implementation of inquiry learning. This is a tool that I would confidently share with colleagues. Also having been authored by the Queensland Government, it makes for a trustworthy source. 

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Back to the Garten: Inquiry-Based Learning in an Outdoor Kindergarten Classroom

Back to the Garten: Inquiry-Based Learning in an Outdoor Kindergarten Classroom | Inquiry Learning | Scoop.it
Amelia Bassett's insight:

This paper has been created through the phenomenographic methodology to provide a comprehensive study of inquiry-based learning within the Kindergarten setting. Notably, for this assignment, I refer to Michalopoulou's (2014) assessment of the efficacy of inquiry based learning for young learners. He refers to the exploration of shapes, colours, natural phenomena. I propose that by using this paper and the Education Queensland Age Appropriate Pedagogical Conceptual Framework, I can further delve into creating and sustaining an environment where students use their senses and view themselves as learners in an environment which is language-rich, dialogic and responsive to their world and their complex needs. This particularly relates to my second questions which was, "how can inquiry learning cater for students of cater for students of varied ability?" 

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