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City lights quiz: can you identify these world cities from space?

City lights quiz: can you identify these world cities from space? | Independent Reading | Scoop.it
Astronauts on the International Space Station took these images of cities at night. Note that up doesn’t necessarily mean north. All images: ESA/NASA

Via Seth Dixon
Alexander peters's insight:
The article was about identifying city lights from the sky. I think that it was fun to do and guess them.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2017 3:25 PM

I'm a sucker for online quizzes like this.  Here is another quiz that shows only the grid outlines of particular cities.  This isn't just about knowing a city, but also identifying regional and urban patterns.  What are some other fun trivia quizzes?  GeoGuessr is one of the more addictive quizzes  where 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" are shown and you have to guess where.  Smarty Pins is a fun game on Google Maps that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few (this is one way to make the urban model more relevant).  If you want quizzes with more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         

 

Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 28, 2017 8:44 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends
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Rescooped by Alexander peters from Geography Education
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City lights quiz: can you identify these world cities from space?

City lights quiz: can you identify these world cities from space? | Independent Reading | Scoop.it
Astronauts on the International Space Station took these images of cities at night. Note that up doesn’t necessarily mean north. All images: ESA/NASA

Via Seth Dixon
Alexander peters's insight:
The article was about identifying city lights from the sky. I think that it was fun to do and guess them.
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2017 3:25 PM

I'm a sucker for online quizzes like this.  Here is another quiz that shows only the grid outlines of particular cities.  This isn't just about knowing a city, but also identifying regional and urban patterns.  What are some other fun trivia quizzes?  GeoGuessr is one of the more addictive quizzes  where 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" are shown and you have to guess where.  Smarty Pins is a fun game on Google Maps that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few (this is one way to make the urban model more relevant).  If you want quizzes with more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         

 

Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 28, 2017 8:44 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends
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How the U.S. Air Force Mapped the World at the Dawn of the Cold War

How the U.S. Air Force Mapped the World at the Dawn of the Cold War | Independent Reading | Scoop.it
One specialized unit gathered data that could guide a missile to a target thousands of miles away.

 

The work of the 1370th bridged a crucial gap in the history of military technology. By the late 1950s, both the United States and the Soviet Union had developed intercontinental ballistic missiles, but satellite navigation systems like GPS weren’t yet up and running. That left military planners with a huge challenge: how to program a missile to hit a target on the other side of the world. Even a tiny mistake could be disastrous.

 

Tags: mapping, cartography, technology, historical.


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Alexander peters's insight:
my opinion on this article it that it really cool and boring but mostly cool i thought that it would be better than that and it wasn't. It sucked.

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The Dank Memes That Are “Disrupting” Politics - The New Yorker

The Dank Memes That Are “Disrupting” Politics - The New Yorker | Independent Reading | Scoop.it
Hua Hsu on humor in the Presidential election, including Jill Stein Internet memes and Alec Baldwin’s Donald Trump impersonation on “Saturday Night Live.”

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Alexander peters's insight:
October 31 2016
This article was about dank memes and how they affect the political system and who created them and if they needed to be stopped. My connection with dank memes are that I create some of them.
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The Whale's Tail

The Whale's Tail | Independent Reading | Scoop.it

"The Ballena Marine National Park is located in Puntarenas, at the South Pacific coast of Costa Rica." 


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Alexander peters's insight:
This article was about the whale and how they were repopulating and how the whale hunting was banned in the 70s. I think this article was really good because use it talked about whales.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 6, 2016 3:33 PM

This National Park in Costa Rica is a delightful example of many things geographic.  Not only is the local biogeography make this a place famous for whales (ballena in Spanish), but the physical geography also resembles a whale's tail.  This feature is called a tombolo, where a spit connects an island or rock cluster to the mainland. Additionally, there is also a great community of citizen cartographers mapping out this park and the surrounding communities. 

 

Tagsbiogeography, environment, geomorphology, physicalwater, landforms.

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►New WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY Inventions and GADGETS◄

As we become more advanced so does our technology. Fashion may change on a whim but with our ever growing devotion to technology, it seems logical tha
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Why are the Baltic states so rattled?

This week, soldiers from Germany and Belgium are settling into a new posting in Lithuania as part of the latest NATO troop deployment. Will their hosts—and the region—feel more secure as a result of their presence?

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Alexander peters's insight:
My opinion is that vlad is a bad guy
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James Piccolino's curator insight, March 24, 2018 9:07 AM
This is one of the many cases where it may be easy to understand each side but harder to understand a solution. Imagine being in the position the Baltic states are currently in? Russia will always put the pressure on them, or at least it seems Putin will.
brielle blais's curator insight, April 1, 2018 1:02 PM
This post showcases how geopolitical relationships can really cause tension, fear, or even bring positivity between many countries. Russia has been on the offense, testing NATO and the Baltic states. The states feel the need to prepare for anything that could happen, one even calling in more troops and for conscription to bring back the feeling of safety in their country. However, this post also showcases how geopolitical relationships can be positive, as President Trump showed his admiration for Russia. This new bond one may call it, scares the Baltic states even more.
tyrone perry's curator insight, April 9, 2018 4:48 PM
The Baltic states seem to be rattled because Putin has been flexing his muscle lately.  Because Trump has vocally been threatening to leave NATO it seems as if Putin is trying to take advantage of a weak support of NATO.  Considering the Baltic states were at one point part of the USSR before they broke away it seems that now would be the right time to for a take over. 
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'Crimetown' podcasts on Providence No. 1 on iTunes charts

'Crimetown' podcasts on Providence No. 1 on iTunes charts | Independent Reading | Scoop.it

"Providence, once the heart of the New England mafia, was chosen for the first season. The approximately 17 to 20 episodes will follow the patterns of corruption in Rhode Island up through the banking crisis of RISDIC, the impeachment of a Supreme Court justice, and City Hall corruption in Operation Plunder Dome."


Via Seth Dixon
Alexander peters's insight:
This was about the tv show that is about the new england mafia. I have watched the show
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 27, 2016 9:31 PM

This is not just a fascinating local story of my new hometown; this is a riveting portrayal of the urban social geographies of organized crime, corruption, and the cosa nostra.  With only three episode to date, they with entertain and inform listeners with delving into the inner working of the mob (and just a heads up--the language will be crass and actual crimes will be discussed--don't say I didn't warn you).  To be honest, of course season one of Crimetown dad to been about Providence, and it is all the more compelling knowing the neighborhoods that are being shaped in this historical portrayal of Rhode Island.    

 

Tagsurban, crime, Rhode Island, neighborhood, socioeconomic, poverty, podcast.

 

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The Dank Memes That Are “Disrupting” Politics - The New Yorker

The Dank Memes That Are “Disrupting” Politics - The New Yorker | Independent Reading | Scoop.it
Hua Hsu on humor in the Presidential election, including Jill Stein Internet memes and Alec Baldwin’s Donald Trump impersonation on “Saturday Night Live.”

Via RefflenSoleyee
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Alexander peters's curator insight, October 31, 2016 12:31 PM
October 31 2016
This article was about dank memes and how they affect the political system and who created them and if they needed to be stopped. My connection with dank memes are that I create some of them.
Rescooped by Alexander peters from Geography Education
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‘The Wall Is a Fantasy’

‘The Wall Is a Fantasy’ | Independent Reading | Scoop.it
A week in the borderlands with migrants and guards.

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Alexander peters's insight:
The Wall Is a Fantasy
By DECLAN WALSH OCT. 14, 2016
This article talks about an american high jumper that want a wall torn down so he goes to Donald j .Trump and he said no. I liked this article because it talks about the political side of things.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 14, 2016 4:40 PM

This is not a political statement but a reiteration of the geographic realities of borders; they are inherently permeable and unite people just as much as they divide. 

 

Tags: Mexico, borders, political.   

tyrone perry's curator insight, February 9, 2018 7:31 PM
According to the people in the article, Mexicans as well as the drug lords will always find ways to get into the US regardless if a way goes up.  Many of them have tried several times to come in and have been caught, detained, brought back to Mexico and then tried again.  I have assisted the border agents in 2007 for five months on active duty orders.  Watching many of them trying to come here to better their lives and the struggles they have to endure is both impressive and sad.  It is the smugglers that are more of the problem and the will stop at nothing to get their product here.  Also according to some ranchers thou they want a closed border and land security they feel as if the wall is a waste because of the resiliency of the Mexicans.