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Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences
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Magnetic Particles for the Purification of DNA Scaffolds for Biomanufacturing DNA-Origami Nanostructures

Magnetic Particles for the Purification of DNA Scaffolds for Biomanufacturing DNA-Origami Nanostructures | iBB | Scoop.it

Asymmetric PCR (aPCR) is often used to generate single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) scaffolds, which can then be assembled into nanoobjects by the DNA-origami technique. The scaffolds are usually purified by agarose gel extraction, a laborious, time consuming, limited, and non-scalable technique that presents low recovery yields, delivers low-quality products. To overcome such pitfalls, Ana Silva-Santos, Rui Silva, Sara Rosa and Miguel Prazeres from BERG-iBB, in collaboration with Pedro Paulo from CQE developed a simple, fast, and potentially scalable affinity-based method comprising magnetic particles. Specifically, scaffolds were synthesized by aPCR and purifed using magnetic particles functionalized with a 20 nt oligonucleotide complementary to the 3′ end of the target. The purified scaffolds were used to assemble 31 and 63 bp edge length tetrahedra with short oligonucleotides and thermal annealing, demonstrating the potential of affinity-based magnetic beads in the production of DNA-origami nanostructures. The work was published in ACS Applied Nanomaterials.

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mRNA Vaccine Manufacturing: Challenges and Bottlenecks

mRNA Vaccine Manufacturing: Challenges and Bottlenecks | iBB | Scoop.it

Vaccines are one of the most important tools in public health and play an important role in infectious diseases control. mRNA vaccines are reaching the stoplight as a new alternative to conventional vaccines due to their precision, safe profile and flexible manufacturing. In fact, the first Covid-19 vaccines to receive regulatory approval are based on mRNA technology. In a joint review just published in Vaccine, Sara Sousa Rosa, Miguel Prazeres, Ana Azevedo from BERG-iBB, together with Marco Marques from University College London, describe the current state-of-art of mRNA vaccines, focusing on the challenges and bottlenecks of manufacturing that need to be addressed to turn this new vaccination technology into an effective, fast and cost-effective response to emerging health crises.

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